Welcome to the American Go Association

Go Spotting: New York

Friday July 3, 2015

1455892_10205587223336295_1169984074605248569_n“I went to New York for a vacation, and when I went to the American Museum of Natural History, at the Japanese Hall, I saw a board of go and stones. I was surprised of the size, because I had never seen a Goban for real,” writes Mateo Nava, of Mexico City.

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The Janice Kim Files – What Go Means to Me

Thursday July 2, 2015

A special E-J Column by Janice Kim 3P

2012.02.21-janiceKimWhen I was young I liked to read, and to watch TV, and didn’t go out much, except alone to explore arroyos, watch movies, or go jogging very early in the morning, when the light was still gray.

Going out jogging, it’s right on the surface of my memory how the air tasted, like an apple, and the way the sidewalk curbs looked in that light, gray on gray, appearing out of the mist like phantom tracks. If it had been raining, there’d be sounds, the splish-gerr-splish of some unseen tires driving through a puddle. Back at home we still have an old pinon tree that you could climb up, and then on to the roof.

On weekend afternoons my activity was to ride my bike to the store, and rent a movie to watch at home. My favorites were “Journey to the Center of the Earth” with James Mason, and “The Golden Voyage of Sinbad” with the old Ray Harryhausen monsters. Later the grocery store put a Ms. Pac-Man arcade game in the back storeroom. The nearby 7-Eleven had Tempest (awesome) and Centipede (slightly less awesome), thus in the shopping district of my own small town forming the classic arcade triumvirate that makes me feel truly special because, I was there. I had a long blister on the side of my hand from using it like a blade with the dial controller, gaining precision and more speed than possible just by turning it with my fingers.

Later someone figured out how to pry open the front panel near the Insert Coin slots, so you could click a small red button inside to increase number of games left on the digital counter. Once you could insert your quarter without that delicious frisson of fear — will it be worth it? Will I ride out this quarter, or will it be wasted on some stupid slip on the first alien attack wave? — the fun was spoiled, and once the summer moment was gone and you could play endlessly for free, it was impossible to recall why it was ever fun in the first place.

I loved board games, but had trouble getting anyone to play. My personality seemed dull to myself, and to lack sparkling qualities. I framed my analysis of the structure and meaning of a game in terms of how to win, and didn’t understand the point of playing otherwise. Sometimes I would say something, or examine flowers or things people left in the street, and people would snort or snicker, or look worried or irritated. My sister was popular and had close friends, but I was too much of an accountant, with friendship owed and due, to be very much fun for anyone. Or maybe it was because I was really different than everyone I knew, invisibly at first, then for certain when I lived in as the only girl insei in Korea, without the ability to speak Korean. Even though the purpose of being there was to play a board game, I still couldn’t get anyone to play very often, because I was one of the least skilled there.

But there were moments. Like when I couldn’t go to the summer camp at the Buddhist temple because they didn’t have girls’ accommodations, and when they came back, Yu Chang-hyuk walked into the research room before everyone else and saw me sitting alone and came over and gave me a hug. Later I beat him for the first and only time in my life, and he sat there muttering to himself, “I don’t know how it is that I won every battle, but lost the war.” That’s how a decade later in another moment, I gave a computer program a 25 stone handicap and defeated it at the AAAI conference. I watched Yu Chang-hyuk play a game online sometime after that, and some kibitzers were saying his moves didn’t make sense, and I wrote that he was the very best player in the world. Someone asked “Why do you say that?” and someone else answered, “Because she LOVES him, ha ha.”

We really can do almost anything. I can see how and why, but also where it is all going. We will all lose in the end, and go to the great review in the sky. The other day my son said that they’ve made big steps in plastification and we may be able to live forever, and I’m thinking about that digital counter in the arcade and the air that tastes like apples and the pinon tree and I find myself hoping we both die too soon to be made into plastic. I’m just looking for another summer moment. Seems like go is our best chance.

 

 

Lin Wins Happy Cup

Monday June 29, 2015

IMG_2917Fifth-grader Ethan Lin took first place  in the 8th annual Happy Cup Tournament, winning all four of his games, on June 7. “The tournament was hosted by the Santa Clara Youth Go Club at Sunflower Chinese School, where thirty-seven young players competed for trophies and cool prizes,” reports organizer Wenguang Wang, “the players and their parents also got to enjoy an ice cream party after the tournament. I decided to organize this tournament so that more and more children could play go, I wanted to make the tournament as fun as possible so the players would enjoy playing go more.” -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Xiao Xie: First place winner Ethan Lin is at far right in the blue shirt.

 

Upcoming Go Events: Seattle, San Diego, Cambridge

Monday June 29, 2015

July 5: Seattle, WA
Monthly Ratings Tournament
Brian Allen manager@seattlego.org 206-632-1122 or 206-545-1424

July 11: San Diego, CA
San Diego Go Club 2015 Summer Soiree
Ted Terpstra ted.terpstra@gmail.com 619-384-3454 or 619-881-6386

July 12: Cambridge, MA
Massachusetts Go Association SummerTournament
Eva Casey eva@theworld.com 617-666-8934
James Peters jamesp30@gmail.com 617-372-6839

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: Calendar,Main Page
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US Go Congress Updates: Last week to save on registration; latest list of pros, Girl’s Tourney & Tennis court report

Saturday June 27, 2015

This is the last week to save on US Go Congress registration; the Congress price goes up July 1. 2015.06.25_hoshikawa-koyo

The latest list of professional go players attending this year’s US Go Congress includes Myungwan Kim, Yilun Yang, Hajin Lee, Feng Yun, Jennie Shen, Wang Qun, Cao Youyin, Ryo Maeda, Koyo Hoshikawa (right), Xuefen (Shirley) Lin and Mingjiu Jiang. Inseong Hwang 8d, a longtime go teacher in Europe, has also just confirmed he’ll be attending this year’s US Go Congress.

The top four AGA-rated under-16 girls (as of August 1, 2015) who enter at the Congress will compete in the first-ever Girl’s Tournament.

Tennis-playing go players can bring their racquets; the Congress site has courts and EJ Managing Editor Chris Garlock will take on all comers.

 

Problem of the Week

Submarine Attack

Black to play