American Go E-Journal

Cotsen pre-registration deadline Tuesday at midnight PDT

Tuesday October 17, 2017

The deadline for the discounted registration for this weekend’s Cotsen Open is midnight PDT Tuesday night; click here now to register.  After that, registration is $25 in cash at the door. Cotsen organizers have just added pro simuls with 2017.10.17_myungwan kimMyungwan Kim 9P and Ahn Dalhoun 9P on Sunday, plus of course the food truck lunch both days (free for pre-registered folks only).  Complete details here. Walk-ins on Saturday will be accepted, but all players who want to play in the first round must be on line to sign in or register by 9:15a on Saturday. Any questions, email  cotsenopen@gmail.com
p
hoto: Myungwan Kim 9p at the 2016 Cotsen; photo by Phil Straus

 

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The Power Report (Part 2 of 3): Motoki does well in Kisei knock-out; Chinese pair wins world championship; New Honinbo league starts

Tuesday October 17, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal

Motoki does well in Kisei knock-out: The first game in the irregular knock-out among the various league winners in the 42nd Kisei tournament was played on October 2. Motoki Katsuya 8P, winner of the C League, beat Yo Seiki (Yu Chengqi) 7P, winner of the play-off between the winners of the two B Leagues. Motoki followed up this success by beating the winner of the A League, Takao Shinji Meijin, on October 12. Taking black, Motoki won by resignation. Next, he will meet the second-place-getter in the S League, Yamashita Keigo.

Chinese pair wins world championship: The second part of the Pair Go World Championship 2017 was held at the Cerulean Tower Tokyu Hotel in Shibuya, Tokyo, on October 5. The winning pair in the Stars Tournament, held at the same venue on August 12 and 13, that is, Xie Yimin 6P and Iyama Yuta 9P, representing Japan, met the reigning Pair Go world champions, Yu Zhiying 5P and Ke Jie 9P of China, in the Masters Match. The Chinese pair earned their title in the Pair Go World Cup 2016 Tokyo. Playing white, Yu and Ke defended their title, forcing Xie and Iyama to resign after 198 moves. Like the final in the August event, the game was played in the Noh Theater in the basement of the hotel.
A unique event, the Go AI Research and Goodwill Game by the Pair Go Format, was held on the previous day. Xie, Iyama and the program DeepZenGo were matched against Yu, Ke and DeepZenGo. To fit the Pair Go format, the human players on each team played as one member of the pair with the AI program; they were free to consult each other and together played every second move for their side. This was a lighthearted event, with the players occasionally bursting into laughter. Xie, of course, could also follow what the Chinese players were saying, which she said made the game even more fun. Just for the record, this game was also won by the Chinese pair.

New Honinbo league starts: The first two games in the 73rd Honinbo League were played on October 5. Yamashita Keigo 9P (B) beat Kobayashi Satoru 9P by resig. and Motoki Katsuya 8P (W) beat Shibano Toramaru 7P, also by resig. So far, October has been a good month for Motoki, the previous Honinbo challenger.

Tomorrow: Record age gap in women’s game; Mutsuura wins Agon Kiriyama Cup; Tengen title match starts

Upcoming Go Events: Los Angeles and Washington, DC

Monday October 16, 2017

October 21-22: Los Angeles, CA
2017 Cotsen Open with 6th AGA Pro Prelim
Christopher Saenz cotsenopen@gmail.com

October 28: Washington, DC
National Go Center – Pumpkin Classic Tournament
Gary Smith garrett.smith@nationalgocenter.org 703-254-6429

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: Calendar,Main Page
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The Power Report (Part 1 of 3): Korea stars in Nongshim Cup; 22nd Samsung Cup; Meijin Four: Iyama’s brilliancy

Monday October 16, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal2017.10.16_Nongshim Shin wins 4th game

Korea stars in Nongshim Cup: The opening round of the 19th Nong Shim Spicy Noodles Cup was held in Shenyang City in Liaoning Province in China from September 19 to 22. It was a triumph for Shin Minjun 6P (right) of Korea, who won all four games in this round. He showed that there’s more than one strong player named Shin in Korea. He was born on Jan. 11, 1999 in Busan, became a professional in 2012 and reached 4-dan in 2016. In the same year, he won the 4th King of the New Stars title, which earned him promotion to 5-dan. He was promoted to 6-dan earlier this year. In the Korean qualifying tournament to choose the team for this tournament, he defeated his teacher, Lee Sedol. In the first Nongshim game, he defeated the player, Fan Tingyu, who won seven games in a row in the previous Nongshim Cup.
Results:
Game One (Sept. 19). Shin (W) beat Fan Tingyu 9P (China) by 3.5 points.
Game Two (Sept. 20). Shin (B) beat Yo Seiki (Yu Chengqi) 7P (Japan) by resig.
Game Three (Sept. 21). Shin (B) beat Zhou Ruiyang 9P (China) by resig.
Game Four (Sept. 22). Shin (W) beat Kyo Kagen (Xu Jiayuan) 7P (Japan) by resig.
Time allowance is one hour per player followed by byo-yomi of one minute per move. The remaining members of the Japanese team are Iyama Yuta, Yamashita Keigo, and Ichiriki Ryo. Round Two will be played in Busan, Korea, in November, and Round Three in Shanghai in February.

22nd Samsung Cup: The second and third rounds of the 22nd Samsung Cup were held at the Samsung Confucian Castle Campus in Daejeon City in Korea on September 25 and 26. Two Japanese representatives, Iyama Yuta and 2017.10.16_Samsung Iyama eliminatedYamashita Keigo, had survived the large-scale opening round, but they were both eliminated in the second round. Iyama (B, at left) was matched against Shin Jinseo 8P of Korea. The game featured fierce fighting from early on. Iyama made an oversight and resigned after 118 moves. Yamashita (black) lost to Tong Mengcheng 6P of China; he resigned after 122 moves. Pairings in the semifinals are Dong vs. Gu Zihao (both of China) and Tang Weixing (China) vs. An Kukhyun (Korea)

Meijin Four: Iyama’s brilliancy
As promised, here is some more detail about the 4th game of the current Meijin title match, played on October 2 and 3. Takao Shinji, the challenger, had black. He slipped up in the opening, neglecting to defend a large group because he overlooked a sequence White had to put it into ko. In effect, he had to give White a free move elsewhere when he played an extra move to secure life. That left him a tempo behind in the game, but he played on tenaciously and succeeded in creating complications by leading the game into a large-scale fight. He then played a clever move with Black 101 that seemed to turn the tables in the fight; if White made the “usual” answer, Black had a clever tesuji with move 16 in an unplayed continuation. “Unplayed,” because Iyama came up with a brilliant counter-intuitive combination that enabled him to capture the key stones in the fight at the cost of a couple of sacrifice stones. That gave him the lead. Takao fought on for another 50 moves or so, but was unable to catch up. Iyama even rubbed salt in the wound by making use of the “sacrifice” stones in a later fight. Takao resigned after White 164. The fifth game is already being played on October 16 and 17. It is Takao’s first kadoban, so the second grand slam in Japanese go could be imminent.

Tomorrow: Motoki does well in Kisei knock-out; Chinese pair wins world championship; New Honinbo league starts

Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 11: A calmer game, with hidden reading

Friday October 13, 2017

“This game is a lot calmer than Game 10,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 11. “There’s a lot of 2017.10.13_ag-ag-thumb-11fighting that doesn’t actually come into the game, but I’ll be showing a lot of variations about things that could have happened, so there’s a lot of, you might say, hidden reading. And then there’s a ko at the end, for the life of a group. ”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The Game 11 video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

[link]

Cheng Tops Happy Cup

Friday October 13, 2017

Photo Oct 01, 1 42 35 PMMatthew Cheng 5d, age 10,  topped the Tenth Sunflower Happy Cup Youth Go Tournament on Oct. 1st in Cupertino, California. “Forty kids from 5 to 15 gathered together on a beautiful Sunday afternoon and played four rounds of 13×13 and 19×19 games,” reports Yanping Zhao, who co-organized the event with Wenguang Wang.  Players earned prize tickets after each round, and then exchanged them for various prizes. “It was our way to ensure a really fun experience for every kid,” reports Zhao.  Each participant was also rewarded with a trophy and at the event’s conclusion, all the kids and their parents enjoyed a refreshing ice cream party. -Report by Wenguang Wang; photo by Melody Chan: Matthew Cheng is in the blue T-shirt.

Go Spotting: Daniel Kahneman on go and AI

Friday October 13, 2017

Daniel Kahneman, author of the best-selling book “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” mentions go in a recent “On Being” interview. “On Being” is a2017.10.09_Daniel-Kahneman-bio Peabody Award-winning public radio show and podcast hosted by Krista Tippett. “At about 1:25:30, he is in the midst of talking about artificial intelligence when he mentions my favorite game — the ancient board game of go,” writes Howard Cornett in a blog post. “He talks about how he is fascinated by the fact that a computer program has finally beaten professional humans at a game that is based largely on System 1 thinking, or intuition.”

Categories: Go Spotting
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Tokugawa Memorial Go Congress set for February 2017

Thursday October 12, 2017

Taking in a view of Mount Fuji on your way to a go tournament might seem like a dream but for a week next February it’ll be reality at the2017.10.09_TOKUGAWA MEMORIAL GO GONGRESSTokugawa Memorial Go Congress in Shizuoka, Japan. The first-ever event will run from February 11-18, with just one game in the main tournament daily, the rest of the day occupied with other events including instruction and commentaries by professional go players, as well as a 13×13 tournament, go relay, and kids tournament. Tokugawa Ieyasu was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

Categories: Japan
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Kai Fugami wins 22nd Anniversary Tournament in Seattle

Wednesday October 11, 2017

Kai FugamiThe Seattle Go Center 22nd Anniversary Tournament attracted 40 players on Oct. 1.  They used newly refinished go boards, and enjoyed pizza provided by the AGA Rewards program. The tournament went smoothly, despite the good-sized crowd, and it has already been rated by the AGA.

The Open Section filled up with eight players. The winner was Kai Fugami, playing his first tournament at the Go Center. Kai grew up in Japan, and for a while he was an insei with the Kansai Ki-in. He is a 8-dan amateur in Japan. Kai’s dad grew up in Seattle, and Kai’s family has now moved to Bellingham.  Kai is in college now.

Second place in the Open Section went to Alex (Xinlei) Liu. He is currently an AGA 7 dan. Alex won the Go Center Spring Tournament this year, and placed second to Yue Zhang last year in the Anniversary Tournament. Third place went to Yichen Li, who currently has an AGA 6 dan rating.

The Children’s Prize went to Austen Li, who won all his games in the Handicapped Section. He also placed first in the Double Digit Kyu Player Group. Young Amy Ling placed second in this group.

Go Center Instructor Larry Eclipse won the Middle Group of the Handicapped Section, with volunteer Christian De Oro taking second, and Thursday afternoon manager Nathan Saritzky taking third.

The Upper Group of the Handicapped Section extended up to 2 dan. It was won by Brendan Roof, who selected both volumes of Cho Chikun’s “All About Life and Death” for his prize.  The books were donated to the Go Center. Former Board member Dan (Denga) Tang placed second.

Friends of the Seattle Go Center should note that the Anniversary Party will held on Sunday, October 15, starting at 4 p.m.
photo: Kai Fugami during one of his games.  Photo/Report by Brian Allen

Categories: U.S./North America
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Yinli Wang wins Bingsheng Cup Qualifier

Wednesday October 11, 2017

Yinli (Audrey) Wang has triumphed after a round-robin and elimination qualifier to become the North American representative to the 8th Suzhou Qionglong Mountain Bingsheng Cup World Women Weiqi Tournament. Sixteen women from around the world will be competing at scenic Qionglong Mountain (famous for being the location where Sun Tsu wrote “The Art of War”), from November 6-10 with a top prize of 300,000 RMB (approximately $45,500 US).
- Jeff Shaevel, AGA National Tournament Coordinator