American Go E-Journal » Game Commentaries

Mini vs. Micro Chinese Opening

Friday August 15, 2014

[link]

Published in the August 15, 2014 edition of the American Go E-Journal

Shawn Ray, a 4 dan AGA member, asked his teacher — Kim SeungJun 9P from Korea — about the difference between the Mini and Micro Chinese Openings, which have become very popular recently. Even if you’re not familiar with either variation, you’ll find his explanation interesting. Each week full AGA members get useful information like this in full game commentaries. To sign up for the Members Edition, register with the AGA here.

Categories: Game Commentaries
Share

Redmond on Suzuki-Redmond — Free Game Review

Tuesday August 5, 2014

[link]

As a special free bonus for all E-Journal readers, Michael Redmond’s recent Meijin Tournament game commentary appears here.  Full AGA members get exciting commentaries like this every week.  The game commentaries alone are worth the price of AGA membership.  For youth memberships the deal is even better, just $10 a year!  To sign up for the members edition, register with the AGA here.

Meijin Tournament, A Section
White:  Suzuki Yoshimichi 7P
Black:  Michael Redmond 9P
Commentary:  Michael Redmond 9P
Published in the August 5, 2014 edition of the American Go E-Journal

Suzuki Yoshimichi is a fighting player who likes to attack or to build thickness.  In this game he started with star points and high kakaris.  This game was played on July 3rd, and was the first round of the Meijin tournament, section A.  In the 2nd round I will play the winner of Cho Chikun vs. O Meien.

Categories: Game Commentaries
Share

Problem Of The Week: Flexible Pro Thinking

Tuesday June 3, 2014

This position comes from Go World #15 in a game between Kato Masao 9P and Rin Kaiho 9P.
Black’s play in this position is just one example of how pros think strategically, while most amateurs think locally.
Click here to see the solution.
A new problem appears every Monday morning. And for archived problems click here.
- Myron Souris, POTW Editor

Game 5 Will Break Tie in Mlily Gu-Lee Jubango This Weekend

Friday May 23, 2014

One thing’s for sure about this weekend’s Gu-Lee game: one of them will take the lead in their historic 10-game jubango. With the score tied at 2-2 and their upcoming break in July, whoever wins this game will take the lead for at least two months until they play again. Lee won the first two games but Gu Li has been making a mighty comeback inside and outside the jubango arena. Including matches from other tournaments, Gu currently has a four-game winning streak against Lee, which according to Go Game Guru is “something that’s never happened before between these two players.” Baduk TV will provide live coverage and commentary and Go Game Guru’s An Younggil 8p will translate and discuss the game with Baduk TV Live viewers via chat. For more information including past games and when game five will be available in your time zone, please visit Go Game Guru.
— Annalia Linnan, based on a longer article by Go Game Guru; photo courtesy of Go Game Guru

Problem Of The Week: Classic for a Reason

Tuesday May 13, 2014

This study comes from Xuan Xuan QiJing, a 14th century work, which may be the most copied problem set in go.  Black plays.  The odd nature of the correct move sequence may throw off some stronger players, so that weaker players may actually find the solution faster! Click here to see the solution.
A new problem appears every Monday morning. And for archived problems click here.
- Myron Souris, POTW Editor

Kyu Review of Lee-Gu Jubango Game 3 Posted

Monday April 14, 2014

Benjamin Hong has just published a review of the Lee-Gu Jubango Game 3 on his BenGoZen blog. for the Game 3 of Lee Sedol 9p and Gu Li 9p’s jubango was released yesterday. Hong is a single-digit kyu player and says that “As with the pre­vi­ous reviews of Games 1 and 2, this review con­tin­ues to be geared towards kyu play­ers who strug­gle with the advanced analy­sis and dis­cus­sion that nor­mally occurs between dan and pro­fes­sional level play­ers.” He adds that “There is com­men­tary for every move so that hope­fully you won’t ever feel lost. In addi­tion, I am happy to announce that frozen­soul (5d) has joined forces with me again for this game review. Many thanks goes out to him for pro­vid­ing a num­ber of the insights you’ll see through­out the review.” photo courtesy GoGameGuru

Categories: Game Commentaries
Share

Lee Sedol Off and Running as MLily Jubango Begins with Gu Li

Sunday January 26, 2014

Gu Li 9p & Lee Sedol 9pThough both players shocked fans and each other with many unexpected moves, Lee Sedol 9p defeated rival Gu Li 9p in the first game of their jubango, or ten-game series, on January 26 in Beijing. Cheering on Lee were his wife and daughter while Gu was backed by his former teacher, legendary instructor Nie Weiping 9p. Younggil and others provided live commentary during the game but Younggil is also working on written commentary for those who may have missed it. For more information on the MLily Gu vs Lee jubango including photos, analysis, and continuous updates, please visit Go Game Guru.
– Annalia Linnan, based on a longer article by Go Game Guru; photo and game record courtesy of Go Game Guru

 

[link]

Game Commentary: Redmond on the Samsung Final

Thursday December 12, 2013

After a very calm start for both players, Lee Sedol 9P starts to attack in the middle game of the Samsung Game 2 final (Korean Fans Shocked By Loss in Samsung Cup Final As Tang Weixing 3P Sweeps Lee Sedol 9Pon

[link]

December 11, sparking a very exciting fight, where I’ve concentrated most of my comments. Tang Weixing 3P ably parries Lee’s attack and after the dust settles it’s a very close game.

- Michael Redmond 9P 

 

Categories: Game Commentaries,World
Share

Li Three-Peats in Young Lions

Wednesday November 27, 2013

Yunxuan Li 6d has won the American Go Honor Society’s (AGHS) Young Lion’s tournament, for the third year in a row. “The tournament was very competitive,” writes organizer Calvin Sun, “with many new faces appearing this year. The first board topped the Active Games list, attracting almost 100 observers on KGS.” Competing on Nov. 16th and 17th, Li topped a field of 34 players with a 4-0 record. “The tournament was really great” Li told the E-Journal, “it is amazing to see new players each year. I want to thank the AGHS for giving this opportunity to North American youth, to compete and communicate with each other. All the games I played were so difficult. This was probably the most competitive year for the Young Lion’s yet.” Li graciously agreed to provide commentary on his crucial 2nd round match with Jimmy Yang 5d, and the attached game record is a freebie for all E-J readers.  “I think it is very beneficial for young people to play go, it helps enlarge our imagination, and develops a sense of logic,” says Li. “It is very cool to have go as a friend when you are young, because it really helps you mature a lot.” 11 players 3 dan and up competed in the Open Section, which Li won. In Division 1, from 2d to 3k, Jeremiah Donley 1k took top honors; Division 2, from 5k to 9k was won by Frederick Bao 5k; Matthew Qiu 16k took the prize in Division 3, from 10k to 21k. Stay tuned for AGHS’ next big tournament, the School Team Tournament, which will be held in March. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Wenguang Wu: Li, at left, plays with Fang Tian Feng 8P. The kid with the yellow shirt, who is watching the game is Ding Hao 6d, an insei from Beijing Ge Yu Hong Dojo.

[link]

Iyama Retains Honinbo Title With 4.5-Point Win in Game 7

Saturday July 20, 2013

In the end, Iyama Yuta 9P’s hold on the Honinbo title came down to 4.5 points. That was Iyama’s margin of victory over Takao Shinji 9P in the final game of the 68th Honinbo title, which concluded on July 18 at 7:42p after 262 moves in Hadano, Kanagawa prefecture, Japan. This is the third time in three years that the Honinbo has gone the full 7-game distance, including last year when Iyama took the title from Yamashita Keigo 9P. Iyama and Takao began their grueling duel in mid-May with Iyama winning the first game. Takao quickly made up the loss by controlling the next two games. However, Iyama (right) was not intimidated and fought back in games four and five, giving himself a chance to capture the match in game six, but Takao quickly extinguished those hopes in just 194 moves to set up yet another dramatic final game for the match. In the decisive seventh game (left), Iyama, taking black, used almost half of his eight-hour time allowance during the first day alone. When Takao sealed the move (W74) at 5:07p on July 17, he had four hours and forty-eight minutes remaining while his opponent only had four hours and five minutes. At 9a the next morning, the tricky sealed move was revealed and

[link]

“[changed] the flow of the game,” according to live game commentator Rin Kanketsu 7P. Yet up until move 70, either player could have taken the title. It was white’s tenuki at move 82 that was the crucial misstep that allowed black to secure thickness and give Iyama the advantage. White attempted to complicate the game at move 92 but Iyama stayed unfazed through the endgame and claimed victory with only two minutes left on his clock. In a post-game interview, Iyama said he felt fortunate to have held on to the title after such a challenging series. Takao felt lucky he made it to the end but was disappointed in his own performance. Since his most recent Honinbo title in 2007, Takao has tried to “reclaim the crown” three times to no avail. Iyama, on the other hand, holds five of the seven major Japanese titles (Kisei, Honinbo, Tengen, Oza, and Gosei) and also won the 25th Asian TV Cup at the end of June, proving his international prowess.
- Annalia Linnan, based on a more detailed report — including more photos and game records — on Go Game Guru; photos courtesy Go Game Guru