American Go E-Journal » China

Myungwan Kim to Broadcast on Ing Pro Finals

Tuesday August 9, 2016

Tonight (Aug. 9) and Thursday (Aug. 11), Myungwan Kim 9p will provide live commentary on the finals of the 8th Ing Pro Cup between Park Junghwan 9p and Tang Weixing 9p. The broadcasts will start each evening at 11 p.m. on the East Coast, 8 p.m. Pacific, on the AGA’s YouTube channel. Broadcasting with Myungwan will be our newest host, badatbaduk, a Twitch broadcaster and AGA 4d. Please tune in!

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Deadline, Schedule Extended for Chinese Tournament with Tygem Prelim

Friday July 29, 2016

big_GThe playing dates and deadline for sign ups to China Qiyuan’s new 2016 Gold Cup World Amateur Go Tournament, with online preliminaries for players outside of the major go countries to be held on Tygem, have been pushed back.  The prelims will now take place starting August 8, with sign-ups allowed until August 2. “The prizes and playing opportunities for the players who make it past the prelims make it well worth trying,” said AGA President Andy Okun, who noted that the new playing dates no longer overlap with the European and US go congresses. The deadline for registration is August 2, 12 p.m. Beijing time; details and the registration form can be found here.   The preliminaries will select 10 Chinese players, six Korean players and four from the rest of the world.  Although competition can be expected to be rough, players down to 18 kyu are welcome to register.  Winners of the online prelim will play face to face at the Xiamen Aqua Resort Hotel in Fujian from Sept. 14-19.

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Categories: China,Go News
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Last Minute Chance to Sign Up for Major China Amateur Tournament

Tuesday July 19, 2016

China Qiyuan has announced the 2016 Gold Cup World Amateur Go Tournament, with online preliminaries for players outside of the major go countries to be held on Tygem. “It is a last minute invitation, but the prizes and playing opportunities for the players who make it past the prelims make it worth a shot,” said AGA President Andy Okun. The deadline for registration is July 21; details and the registration form can be found here.   The preliminaries will be held from July 27 to Aug. 10, selecting 10 Chinese players, six Korean players and four from the rest of the world.  Although competition can be expected to be rough, players down to 18 kyu are welcome to register.  Winners of the online prelim will play face to face at the Xiamen Aqua Resort Hotel in Fujian from Sept. 13-18.

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Categories: China,Go News
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Playing Go in Hong Kong

Sunday July 3, 2016

-by Dave Weimer

13254283_10153430156721793_2158670935980139262_nTwenty years ago I lived around the corner from the Hong Kong Go Association in the Wan Chi District of Hong Kong. Returning to Hong Kong last fall, I discovered that the HKGA had moved. After some investigation, I was able to find the new location in the Kowloon District. During my first visit I was amazed that a search of a card file revealed my membership at the old location!

Some things were the same: I was the only non-Hong Kong native who regularly played; players were friendly and welcoming, often despite the absence of a common language; and counting was usually by the Chinese method. The major difference was that Friday evenings, rather than Saturdays and Sundays, were the best times to find a lot of players and games against opponents of various strengths. My nemesis, a 13 year old named Matthew, was a regular on Friday evenings and we had many enjoyable games. Unlike twenty years ago, when most games seemed to involve big dragons fighting to the death, games seem to show more style now and players usually spend time going over completed games to improve.

As finding the Association might be difficult for someone not familiar with Hong Kong, I offer the following information:

Hours: Tuesdays through Sundays, 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Fees for non-members: HK$20 (about US$2.50) on weekdays; HK$40 on weekends and public holidays.

Directions: Take the MTR to the Lai Chi Kok Station; take the B1 exit and go straight ahead a few steps to Tai Nan West Road; turn left onto Tai Nan West Road; go three short blocks to its end at King Lam Street (there is a Honda dealer on the corner); turn left onto Kim Lam Street for one block to Yee Kuk West Street; turn left and enter Number 82 on the left almost immediately; take the elevator to the third floor; play Go! (Based on experience, I highly recommend following these directions rather than relying on a map app.) -Photo courtesy of Hong Kong Go Association’s Facebook Page

 

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Categories: China,World
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Myungwan Kim 9p to comment the Bailing Cup, 6/29 and 7/1 at 8:30pm PDT (UTC-7)

Tuesday June 28, 2016

Myungwan Kim 9p will return to provide live commentary of the Bailing Cup round of 32, between Tang Weixing and Park Junghwan, starting at 8:30pm PDT on 6/29. He’ll also provide live commentary on the round of 16, on July 1, again starting at 8:30pm. The early rounds of the Bailing cup are being played in Beijing, and the players have 2hrs 45min, with five one-minute byo-yomi periods following. They’ll take a lunch break from 9:30pm to 10:30pm. Twitch broadcaster “badatbaduk”, himself an AGA 4d, will host the commentary. You can watch the event on the AGA YouTube Channel or the AGA Twitch stream.

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Players Sought Last Minute for ENN World Weiqi Open

Monday May 2, 2016

The AGA is seeking up to 12 US representatives for the first ENN Cup World Weiqi Open Tournament. The ENN Cup is a new world tournament and the preliminary selection will be held May 24-28 at the China Qiyuan office in Beijing, China. Winners in the preliminary section will go on to compete in the main competition. The tournament will be a knock-out style format. There will be 2,000RMB (about $300 USD) prize money for each game (pre-tax amount). Players must bear all costs themselves (air fare, lodging, food, etc.) Note: Competitions for the top 32, 16, 8 places will take place on November 6th, 8th, and 10th in China. Eligibility: North American citizen, AGA/CGA/Mexico Go Association member, as well as each country’s own eligibility requirements. Interested players should contact cherry.shen@usgo.org and president@usgo.org immediately.

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American pros Liu, Lui Fight Bravely in Ing Cup

Friday April 22, 2016

American professionals Andy Liu 1p and Eric Lui 1p fought bravely earlier this week in an unsuccessful attempt to make it through the first round of the 8th Ing Pro Cup in Shanghai. The two notched strong games but succumbed in the end to the legends they were paired against in the top drawer international tournament.  Both played well, according to Kim Myungwan 9p. Eric Lui built up a strong position but his opponent, Hane Naoki 9p, “was such an experienced player that he controlled the game, avoiding Eric’s provocation.”  Andy Liu, facing Lee Sedol 9p, actually started ahead.  “Andy was winning in the OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbeginning, up until around fifty moves,” Kim said.  “I think that Lee Sedol was a little bit nervous because Andy started well. It’s not so surprising because Andy has played very well recently at pro tournaments. Andy later pursued territory too much which eventually backfired.”  Hane Naoki fell in the second round, but Lee Sedol made it through and plays Kang Dongyoon on Sunday in the Ing’s third round.  Other third round match ups are Park Junghwan 9p v. Ke Jie 9p, Shi Yue 9p v. Chen Youye 9p, and Tang Weixing 9p v. Kim Jiseok 9p.  The winners will continue on to June finals in Tibet.  Meanwhile, over the weekend, Liu (left in photo at right) came to the end of his run in the Kansai Kiin’s Sankei Cup.  After four wins, perhaps the best pro tournament run a Western player has had in Asia, he came up short against Daisuke Murakawa 8p, a very strong opponent.  All three games available below.
- report by Andy Okun and Ted Terpstra
2016.04.21_eric lui v hane naoki
2016.04.21_Andy Liu v murakawa
2016.04.21_andy liu v lee sedol

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Myungwan Kim to broadcast Ing Cup Round 3 this Saturday

Thursday April 21, 2016

The AGA’s YouTube & Twitch channels will feature commentary from Myungwan Kim 9p on the games of the 8th Ing Cup this Saturday April 23rd, with commentary starting at 8pm Pacific time.

“If Round 2 goes as expected, we’ll cover Ke Jie vs Park Jungwhan, who are set to face each other if they both win on Thursday” says co-host Andrew Jackson.  “That’s the most likely game.  Otherwise, Myungwan will pick which game we cover.  Either way, coverage starts at 8pm!”
The Ing Cup, a quadrennial international tournament with one of the largest prizes ever, resumed play this past week, with US favorites Andy Liu 1p and Eric Lui 1p drawing hard matches in the early rounds against Lee Sedol 9p and Hane Naoki 9p respectively. Both Liu and Lui lost.
Tune in on the AGA’s Twitter or Facebook feeds to find out the final pairing and any other late breaking announcements!
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Categories: China
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The Traveling Board: Eric Lui on the 2016 IMSA

Wednesday April 6, 2016

By Eric Lui2016.04.06-eric-lui-1st_IEMG_-Feb-28-2016-11-36-AM

It’s unusually nice out today*. As I stroll down my neighborhood and head towards the park, the sun’s rays hit me square in the back, right between the shoulder blades. The tingling warmth spreads all the way down and brings feeling to my toes…

It’s midnight in Huai-An, China, the site of the inaugural IMSA Elite Mind Games 2016. After a thirty-hour ordeal that included a cab ride of record-breaking speed between Shanghai’s international and domestic airports followed by a half-day layover, I arrived at the New Century Grand Hotel, a majestic venue secluded from downtown and just about everything else.

I’m looking around for a familiar face. There are none, to my slight disappointment mixed with relief, since at this point I’m rather unsure in my ability to form a coherent thought, let alone communicate in words. I stumble inside the luxurious living quarters on the eighth floor (surely a sign of good things to come), dragging the trusty luggage that has been with me to the ends of the earth. I check my phone for messages, and there it is, in flawless pinyin, ‘ming tian jian’, meaning ‘see you tomorrow’. Just for a moment, the fatigue melts away and my mind is clear and sharp.

The next morning at the dining hall I’m greeted by Ryan Li and Sarah Yu, the Canadian half of our North American Go Dream Team led by Mingjiu Jiang on the first board and Andy Okun, AGA president extraordinaire, as team leader. With players from around the world representing the various disciplines (Go, Chess, Draughts, Bridge, and Xiangqi), it’s a truly international event, complete with a security checkpoint and metal detectors located at the entrances to each of the playing areas.

2016.04.06_Team_IMSA-cropped“If the situation is bad, keep your head up and wait for your opponent to make a mistake.” Mingjiu chuckled slightly, motioning with his fork towards the air. It was lunch the next day and he was giving us some last-minute advice before we were set to take on Korea in the Men’s Team competition. We nodded solemnly in unison, Ryan and me, carefully avoiding each other’s gaze to prevent the inevitable burst of laughter. Despite arriving after midnight and missing the opening ceremony, Mingjiu appeared in good spirits, greeting anyone he recognized with a hearty clap on the shoulder. With so many varied and delicious desserts up for grabs, it was all I could do to resist overindulging myself right before the game. I reluctantly bade farewell to the sublime chocolate cake, looking back one last time before taking the long walk to the battlefield with the others, each of us lost in our own thoughts.

Both Korea and China fielded teams of some of the world’s top players. While we were unable to take a game from either 2016.04.06_Ryan-Li-1st_IEMG_-Feb-27-2016-11-038country, we scored a win against Japan in a game where Ryan (right) fully showcased his fighting skills to defeat one of Japan’s up-and-coming young professionals. Against the Taiwanese team there were also good chances to win, although their superior experience prevailed in the end. After consecutive defeats, we managed to regain some pride with a victory over Europe. Overall, we were still somewhat disappointed, but there were moments during my own games when I felt that my opponents were not as strong as I imagined, and I was not as weak. With steady, determined effort, I wholeheartedly believe that in the foreseeable future the West will be competitive on the international stage.

After the conclusion of the Men’s Team and Women’s Individual events, the Pair Go knockout in which Ryan and Sarah participated took place. I wandered into the game review room during the final round, and, whilst standing around awkwardly, was invited by one of the top Taiwanese players, Chen Shiyuan 9p, to take a seat alongside him and Zhou Junxun 9p as they analyzed their compatriots’ game. Being able to ask them questions when I didn’t understand something was a real treat. Even after just a couple of hours, I felt like I had gotten stronger. These are the moments that every go player lives for.

I’m on the trail now, picking up speed as I navigate the winding path through the riverbend. When I reach the top of the hill, I’m breathing hard and my jet-lagged legs are starting to cry out in protest. In just a few days it’ll be roughly twenty degrees cooler again for a while before the warmth finally returns for good. But for now, on the cusp of spring, I’ll take one more lap around the baseball field, one more breath of the crisp air, enjoying the moment while it lasts, wishing for one more day in sunny Huai-An, and my very own copy of AlphaGo.

*The IMSA Elite Mind Games were held in early March and Eric sent in this report a few weeks ago; we apologize for the delay in publication. Click here for the E-Journal’s previous reports on the IMSA. Team photo (l-r): Mingjiu Jiang, Sarah Yu, Andy Okun, Eric Lui, Ryan Li

 

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Young Players Wanted for Li Min Cup First Session

Saturday April 2, 2016

Young North American players are being sought for the first session of the new Li Min Cup World Best Go Star Championship from April 25 to 30 in Hangzhou, China. Note that this a separate event from the Li Min Cup Finals, which we reported on earlier this week (AGA Seeks Young Player for Li Min Cup 3/27/2016)The events have different deadlines, structures, and compensations; most notably, players will cover all expenses to attend the first session, while organizers cover costs for the finals, so they are in fact quite different despite the title.

Eligibility: US/Canadian citizen born after Jan. 1, 1993 for amateur players and US/Canadian citizen born after Jan. 1, 1996 for professional players. Players must also meet AGA’s/CGA’s eligibility requirements too. Prizes (Pre-tax amounts): 1st round: 3,000 RMB (if you are top 32 player). 2nd round: 4,000 RMB (if you are top 16 players)

Interested players should respond before midnight April 7th. Please email cherry.shen@usgo.org

- Joel Sherman

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