American Go E-Journal » Master/AlphaGo Commentaries

Self-taught AlphaGo Zero bests all previous versions in record time

Wednesday October 18, 2017

AlphaGo Zero, the latest version of the go-playing AlphaGo AI, defeated all previous versions of AlphaGo in just forty days. More importantly, AlphaGo Zero was taught go’s rules, but given no additional instructions, instead learning the best moves by playing 2017.10.18_alphago-zero-saran-poroongmillions of games against itself. Details of the new program were published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

“AlphaGo Zero independently found, used and occasionally transcended many established sequences of moves used by human players,” write the AGA’s Andy Okun and Andrew Jackson in an accompanying article. “In particular, the AI’s opening choices and end-game methods have converged on ours — seeing it arrive at our sequences from first principles suggests that we haven’t been on entirely the wrong track. On the other hand, some of its middle-game judgements are truly mysterious and give observing human players the feeling that they are seeing a strong human play, rather than watching a computer calculate.”

The ability to self-train without human input is a crucial step towards the dream of creating a general AI that can tackle any task, reports Nature. In the nearer-term, though, it could enable programs to take on scientific challenges such as protein folding or materials research, said DeepMind chief executive Demis Hassabis at a press briefing. “We’re quite excited because we think this is now good enough to make some real progress on some real problems.”

Prof Satinder Singh, a computer scientist at Michigan University, who reviewed the findings for the journal said: “The AI massively outperforms the already superhuman AlphaGo and, in my view, is one of the biggest advances, in terms of applications, for the field of reinforcement learning so far.”
- Chris Garlock; Image credit: Saran_Poroong Getty Images

Read more…
DeepMind’s Go-playing AI doesn’t need human help to beat us anymore
AlphaGo Zero: Google DeepMind supercomputer learns 3,000 years of human knowledge in 40 days
DeepMind has a bigger plan for its newest Go-playing AI
AI versus AI: Self-Taught AlphaGo Zero Vanquishes Its Predecessor
AlphaGo Zero Goes From Rank Beginner to Grandmaster in Three Days—Without Any Help
‘It’s able to create knowledge itself’: Google unveils AI that learns on its own
DeepMind AlphaGo Zero learns on its own without meatbag intervention
This more powerful version of AlphaGo learns on its own

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 11: A calmer game, with hidden reading

Friday October 13, 2017

“This game is a lot calmer than Game 10,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 11. “There’s a lot of 2017.10.13_ag-ag-thumb-11fighting that doesn’t actually come into the game, but I’ll be showing a lot of variations about things that could have happened, so there’s a lot of, you might say, hidden reading. And then there’s a ko at the end, for the life of a group. ”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The Game 11 video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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Redmond AlphaGo Q&A released

Wednesday October 11, 2017

Michael Redmond’s series of commentaries on the fascinating AlphaGo-AlphaGo games has proven extremely popular, with nearly 90,0002017.10.11_ag-ag-thumb-qa views so far, and lots of comments from viewers. Today Redmond, along with host Chris Garlock, releases his first Q&A video, responding to some of those questions. “It’s been a wonderful challenge, not only trying to understand these complex, historic games, but figuring out how to explain them,” says Redmond, “so the response to the videos has been quite gratifying and we’re pleased to acknowledge and respond in this new series of Q&A videos.”

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 10 (Part 2): An unexpected trade and a 10-group battle

Saturday October 7, 2017

Part 2 of the Game 10 commentary begins at move 113. “At this point, the game looked ready for a peaceful endgame, with White in the lead.”2017.10.07_AlphaGo vs. Alphago Game 10-part2 2017.10.07_ag-ag-thumb-10bsays Michael Redmond 9p in his commentary. “By move 121, however, White has given away about 20 points, an unexpected trade that transforms the game radically. Back in a wildly dangerous middle game, complications that arise from a fight in the center will put ten groups in danger.”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock. (For Part 1, click here for the video commentary and here for the sgf file).

“Looking forward to these every week,” Leo Dorst commented on Part 1, echoing the sentiments of many viewers. “Such a great way to start the weekend after a late Friday night at the Amsterdam Go Club. Rereading my old Go World magazines I see Michael moving to Japan. If he had not done so and trained there, we might not now have these wonderful commentaries. Sometimes the world just makes sense…” Watch for a Q&A video here next week with Redmond in which he responds to selected comments.

The Game 10 videos are produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf files were created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 10 (Part 1): An unusual pincer and a new move

Friday October 6, 2017

“This game is like two games in one, and it starts with an unusual pincer by black and then a new move by white,” says Michael Redmond 9p in 2017.10.06_ag-ag-thumb-10ahis game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 10. “Then there’s a series of fights that goes in a circle around the board, each one contained but each quite exciting.”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The game is so complex that the commentary is being released in two parts; Part 1 goes through move 112 and Part 2, which will be released Saturday, October 7 at 6p EDT, contains the remainder of the commentary. Enjoy!

The Game 10 videos are produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf files were created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 9: A trade and the ko that didn’t happen

Friday September 29, 2017

“In this game there’s a big fight on the left side involving a ko and a trade,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 9. “Then there’s another ko that doesn’t happen.”   2017.09.29_ag-ag-thumb-9

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

Stay tuned for a special video coming soon in which Redmond responds to viewer questions on the AlphaGo-AlphaGo games so far. And Redmond’s Game 10 commentary is coming too, “an outstanding game, a very complicated game that was keeping me up at night trying to understand it. If you’re a serious go player, this game is going to have an impact.”

The Game 9 video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

 

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 8: Two 3-3 invasions and some spectacular fighting

Friday September 22, 2017

“In this game we’re going to see two 3-3 invasions; when AlphaGo jumps in to the 3-3, the other AlphaGo does as well,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 8. “This is something that happens a lot, and I have my own theories about why that might be. We’re also going to see the follow-up moves in both of those corners, so we’ll see some options about possible follow-ups. And then there’s going to be some spectacular fighting inside of Black’s moyo. “2017.09.22_ag-ag-thumb-8

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 7: Go Seigen-like attachments, a 3-3 variation and a running fight

Friday September 15, 2017

“In this game we will see some Go Seigen-like attachments that White plays against a Black shimari,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game 2017.09.15_ag-ag-thumb-7commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 7. There’s also “an AlphaGo variation for the early 3-3 invasion, and after White makes a moyo there will be a running fight in the center.”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, just posted on the AGA’s YouTube channel and hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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Your Move/Readers Write: AlphaGo is unbeatable; get over it

Sunday September 10, 2017

“Apparently, some people believe that someday a human will be able to defeat AlphaGo,” writes Joel Sanet. “It’s not gonna happen. The reason is biological, not technological. No human being is capable of thinking about the game the way AlphaGo does. AlphaGo’s way of thinking is better than the human way; ergo it is no longer possible for a human to beat AlphaGo. We human beings are not capable of considering a choice of moves by determining a concrete number for each called “the probability of winning” then choosing the one with the highest value, but this is what AlphaGo does.

“Thinking that it is possible for a human to win now is due to anthropomorphization, the application of human attributes to something that is not human, a process rampant in the go community. I have heard people say, ‘AlphaGo likes the early 3-3 invasion’ or ‘He (or she) likes thickness.’ AlphaGo can’t ‘like’ anything because it has no emotions. It plays the early 3-3 invasion because it maximizes its probability of winning in certain openings. Also, as far as I know, AlphaGo has no concept of thickness. It has nothing to do with how AlphaGo derives its moves. Furthermore, AlphaGo is not a ‘he’ or a ‘she’. AlphaGo is an ‘it’.

To attribute thinking to AlphaGo is also a mistake. I wrote that it chooses the option with the highest probability of winning. It doesn’t “choose” anything because it isn’t self-aware. AlphaGo receives input, does what it is programmed to do, and produces output. To me this is more akin to a human knee jerk than to true thought. A doctor’s percussion hammer causes sensory neurons to fire off a signal to the spinal cord where it is processed and returned to the knee via motor neurons without intercession of the brain. This is analogous to AlphaGo’s input-programming-output. AlphaGo’s programming is immutable. The day AlphaGo changes its own programming is the day I’ll say it thinks.

Nevertheless, humans can learn from AlphaGo. We have learned that the shoulder hit is a lot more useful than anyone thought. AlphaGo’s new 3-3 invasion joseki makes sense so we can benefit from that, but I advise you not to do the early invasions until you are able to read the rest of the game to the end.

Alphago’s supremacy over humans is no reason to feel that studying go is a dead end. Your study is de facto open-ended because you will never reach the end of it. People study go to improve, not to become the strongest player on the planet.”

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AlphaGo vs AlphaGo Game 6: Flexibility and a bias for complications

Sunday September 10, 2017

“In this game AlphaGo shows its flexibility when Black abandons a running fight and tries to control the open lower side of the board instead,”2017-09-10-alphago-game-5-video says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 6. “In the second fight of the game, White deals with two weak groups masterfully. Finally, Alphago shows its bias for complications when White allows a dangerous ko in the corner.”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock. As usual, the commentary in the sgf file here includes variations not covered in the video commentary, and the sgf commentary includes additional comments transcribed from the video.

The video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

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