American Go E-Journal » Europe

UK Go Updates: Youth Team’s Narrow Loss to Czechia

Friday February 6, 2015

 European Youth Go Team Championship: In round four of the European Youth Go Team Championship, the UK’s youth team narrowly lost to Czechia 2-3. They currently rank 11th out of 13 teams.
- edited by Amy Su from reports on the BGA website.

Categories: Europe
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An Interview with Top European Players Studying in China

Thursday February 5, 2015

Six top European players are currently studying in Beijing, China under a program sponsored by CEGO China. The Chinese Go magazine Qi-Shi recently published an interview with five of the players: Pavol Lisy (Slovakia),  Ali Jabarin (Israel), Lukas Podpera (Czech Republic), Jan Simara (Czech Republic), Dusan Mitic (Serbia). Andrii Kravets of the Ukraine was not available. Lisy and Jabarin are two new European pros. The report was translated by Jennie Shen and Kevin Huang and edited by Chris Garlock.

Qi-Shi: What’s the status of go in your countries?2015.02.04_beijing-go school

Podpera: There are about 250 active go players in Czechia, and their level is getting stronger and stronger. Last year, for example, the Czech team won the European team championship. There are four European 6ds in Czechia; we (Lucas and Jan) are two of them.

Lisy: I’m from Slovakia. There are about 50 active players there, including eight dan players.

Jabarin: Israel has about 50 players. I feel like the talent level is pretty high, because even though some countries have more players, we can beat them. We have some promising young players.

Qi-Shi: How long have you been playing go? What’s your background?

Podpera:  I started to play go at the age of 7. My father introduced me to the game because he used to play the game in the university.

Simara:  I started [to play go] because I played chess, then I met go. When I was about fifteen, I switched from chess to go.

2015.02.04_pro review-1Qi-Shi: Why is go more interesting to you?

Simara: Go has much more possibilities.

Mitic: It’s the same as with Lukas — I learned go from my father.

Lisy: I started to play go at the age of five. My father taught me.

Ali: I got introduced to the game by a friend. I just started to play when I was twelve, started going to the tournaments, then kept playing since then.

Qi-Shi: You came to Bejing to study at the Ge’s Academy. What did you learn here? Do you have a goal?

Podpera: The European pro qualification which I would like to try to pass. Otherwise I don’t have any real future planning; let’s see how it will go.

Simara: I think I’m improving in all areas.

Lisy:  I feel like I’m improving in the school because I spend lots of time on go.  I improved mostly at the endgame I think.

Qi-Shi: Do you have a plan for your future? Do you want to be a pro or want to do things related to go?

Podpera: Of course I would like to be a pro.2015.02.04_pro review-2

Simara: About the future, not exactly sure…come back and see, play some games..

Mitic: I have no plans for the future,  except I’ll try to become pro.

Lisy: My plan for the future: to get good results at the international tournaments, win some games against Asian pros, but that’s just a dream.

Jabarin: I was in university and I stopped before I came here, and I told myself I that for at least two or three years, let’s see what I can do with go. The dream is to be able to play competitively in Asia. It’s not a plan; I would say it’s a dream, but that’s the end goal. I hope I can improve as well, I know it’s not very easy.

Qi-Shi: What do you think is the most interesting thing about go?

Podpera: The endless numbers of variations.

Qi-Shi: Which part of go is the most difficult to improve?

Podpera: For me the most difficult thing to improve is the endgame. It’s very hard to count the points exactly, most of the games are decided by the endgame. But here they found how to improve in those go schools with practice.

Simara: The most difficult part to improve I think is reading.

Mitic:  I agree with most of the things Jan said, I think the most difficult part of go is reading.

Lisy: The most difficult part of go, maybe the judgement, I don’t know.

Jabarin:  I think something which is very important is mentality. When you play and also when you study. Having the will to win, the will to try hard, so you’ll study a lot, staying calm while playing is very important, that’s one of the things that I’m trying to improve here. Other than that, I feel like I gained a little bit of knowledge also. I always learn new moves, not just josekis, but new techniques. Then something which I learned about the game, I can just say that to me go is very deep, just feels different from all the other games. It’s not just a game.

Qi-Shi: Who is your go idol?

Podpera and Simara: Iyama Yuta
Mitic: Ali
Pavol: Chen Yaoye
Ali: Tanxiao

2015.02.04_silk road tournamentThe six players played the Silk Road Amateur Tournament in Xian, China (left). Lisy won first place and Jabarin won second place.
Qi-Shi: How did you feel after you won the tournament?

Lisy: I was very happy. The tournament was very good. I enjoyed it, I think, For example the time setting helped me, because I’m used to playing fast games. It was not so difficult to overcome the pressure.

Jabarin: We (Pavol and Ali) just came back from Japan from a tournament, (where) we had decent results. For me, I was feeling a bit more confident. And I was quite proud of some of the games I played in the [Silk Road] tournament. I regret the game I lost to Pavol. The tournament was a lot of fun, so it was good, of course I was happy with the prize money.

Qi-Shi: People think westerners and Asians think differently. Do you think that western go players and Asian go players think differently?

Pavol: I don’t know how they think. I think there’s a difference that they care more about the beginning of the game, they know how to finish the game, that’s the difference.

Qi-Shi: Some Asian pros think the feeling/instinct is very important. Do you play more with your       feeling/instinct or reading and judgement?

Ali: Both. I think I understand what he means. The feeling is somehow much more important. Sometimes we play much less territorial, play more for a moyo,  maybe not myself, but I think many players in Europe, they play much more moyo style. Sometimes t’s just like ‚Oh wow, this move looks good, feels good,“ not saying it like it is much more precise.

Qi-Shi: What do you want to do for European Go?

Podpera: We can bring some knowledge from China to Europe, open go schools and teach.

Simara: We are all part of the [pro] system. So if some of us are successful, naturally this system is also successful, that’ll be good for everyone.

photos: top right: the Go school in Beijing; 2nd left/3rd right: pro lesson with WangYao 6P; bottom left: Silk Road (also called 1st Qinling Mountains Cup) amateur tournament awards,  Pavol won first place, the prize money was 60,000 RM, (US$10,000).
Click here for more info and photos.

Categories: Europe
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EuroGoTV Update: Ukraine, France, Turkey

Thursday February 5, 2015

Ertug Akkol 1d Ukraine: Svitlana Tarasenko 5k took the Open Championship of Rivine on January 31 while Yaroslav Malko 8k placed second; Andrii Pylypchuk 3k came in third. France: Manuel Frangi 1d bested Guillaume Attia 3d at the 19th Orsay tournament on January 25 while Mathieu Daguenet 3d placed third. Turkey: The 1st Istanbul City Handicap Go Championship Finals finished on January 31 with Ertug Akkol 1d (left) in first, Dogac Kose 1d in second, and Hande Olgar 14k in third.  
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from 
EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

UK Go Updates: Charles Hibbert Wins Maidenhead-Hitachi

Tuesday January 27, 2015

Maidenhead-Hitachi Tournament: On January 24th, Charles Hibbert 2 dan went on to win all three of his games, claiming the Maidenhead title. Coincidentally, it was also his first-ever tournament. Second and third place were claimed by Alistair Wall and Jitka Bartova. All players winning three or two games received a prize. 55 players took part in the event.
- edited by Amy Su from reports on the BGA website.

Categories: Europe
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EuroGoTV Update: Ukraine, United Kingdom, Russia

Tuesday January 27, 2015

Jitka Bartova 1dUkraine: Oleksandr Hiliazov 1d bested Anton Boreiko 4k at the Kharkiv Championship on January 25 while Leonid Shumakov 5k placed third. United Kingdom: The Maidenhead finished on January 24 with Charles Hibbert 2d in first, Alistair Wall 1d in second, and Jitka Bartova 1d (left) in third. Russia: Mikhail Dobricyn 3k took the Russian Championship Under 12 in Cheljabinsk on January 18. Behind him were Egor Arsentjev 2k in second and Savva Mezin 6k in third. 
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from 
EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

UK Go Updates: South Africa Makes Go Moku for the UK

Tuesday January 20, 2015

Pandanet Go European Team Championship: On January 13th, the UK secured a win against the South African team with a score of 3 wins to 1 loss, making it their fifth win in the league. A commentary by Andrew Simons of his own game against Victor Chow 7d can be found in the news article on the BGA website. The UK team currently ranks second to Bulgaria in their league. The two teams will play on February 24th.
- edited by Amy Su from reports on the BGA website.

Categories: Europe
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EuroGoTV Update: Sweden, Czech Republic, Turkey

Monday January 19, 2015

Yaqi Fu 6dSweden: The Jusandan 2015 finished on January 18 in Stockholm with Yaqi Fu 6d (left) in first, Charlie Aakerblom 4d in second, and Fredrik Blowback 6d in third. Czech Republic: Also on January 18, Martin Jurek 5d took the 5th Decin Open Tournament. Behind him were Ondrej Kachyna 2d in second and Tadeas Berkman 1k in third. Turkey: Ertug Akkol 1d bested Mustafa Morca 2k at the 2nd Istanbul City Championship Finals on January 17 while Barkin Celebican 2k placed third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

European Go Federation News: Online EGF Academy to Launch in March; EGF Seeks Young Players for Beijing Go Academy

Monday January 19, 2015

Online EGF Academy to Launch in March: Inanother very important milestone for European go,” European Go Federation (EGF) President Martin Stiassny reports that the new online EGF Academy will launch March 23. “The EGF Academy will offer online-playing, analyzing and teaching in different groups for more than 30 players,” says Stiassny. The Academy is a result of an agreement Ge Yuhong, owner of the go school in Beijing where EGF students are now studying, and Luo Gang, chief manager of CEGO. The General Manager for the project will be Viktor Lin, the vice-president of the Austrian Go Association.

EGF Seeks Young Players for Beijing Go Academy: The EGF is looking for young European go players interested in studying in Beijing under theEGF-CEGO cooperation agreement ((European Go Federation Inks Deal With Chinese to Promote Go in Europe 7/5/2013 EJ). “Our goal is to find players in Europe younger than 18, maybe 16 years old, best case 14 years old,” says Stiassny. “If you have a candidate, Chinese pro Zhao Baolong is coming back to Europe in March, to test these promising boys and girls.”  Contact Stiassny at martin.go.europe@gmail.com for details and to nominate students.

Categories: Europe,Youth
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UK Go Updates: CLGC A Team winners of Online League Season 6

Tuesday January 13, 2015

The Central London Go Club A team — Franciso Divers, Michael Webster and Chuck Fisher — won the 2014 season of the online league and reclaimed the GoGoD shield from Edinburgh. The second division was won by the Cornish Rogues, who will be moving up to the first division next year. The next season of the online league is scheduled to start promptly in April.
- edited by Amy Su from a report on the BGA website.

 

Categories: Europe
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EuroGoTV Update: Germany, Poland, Netherlands

Sunday January 11, 2015

Matthias Terwey 4dGermany: Matthias Terwey 4d (left) took the Essen 2015 on January 11. Behind him were Barbara Knauf 3d and Bernd Radmacher 4d. Poland: Also on January 11, the Polish Youth Championship – U16 playoff finished in Ozarow Mazowiecki with Stanislaw Frejlak 4d in first, Maksym Walaszewski 1k in second, and Julia Bednarska 18k in third. Netherlands: Frank Janssen 6d bested Rene Aaij 4d at the wintergo_2014 in Overasselt while Dick Riedeman 3d came third. 
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from 
EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV