American Go E-Journal » Go News

Korean Pro Visits Mexico

Monday October 17, 2011

The Hankuk Kiwon (Korean Go Association) sent Chun Poong Jho 9P to Mexico this month, in honor of the XIII Iberoamerican Go Tournament. Chun has promoted go internationally for decades, and speaks several languages. Local organizer Siddhartha Avila reports: “Mr. Chun visited the Pipiolo Art School and was received by teachers, parents and students. During the day the kids presented a Mexican song performance, and we had a visit from the Public Education Zone Supervisor as well, who learned about the great benefits of teaching go in kindergarden and elementary schools.  We reported on our participation  in the AGHS School Team Tournament,  and we had the National Youth Go Tournament award ceremony, as well as a conference, lectures, and simultaneous games given by Mr. Chun to the children from first grade to sixth grade.  Mr. Chun  emphasized studying harder and said we should continue working to improve the playing level of Mexican youth, so that our top players can be invited to play at international youth tournaments. There was a rich cultural experience through a session of questions and answers about Korean and Mexican culture and of course about Baduk culture. Finally we wrapped up the event with a dinner at a typical Mexican restaurant with teachers, friends and family.” More pictures from the event are here. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo:  Chun Phoong Jho 9P inspiring youngsters in Mexico City.  Photo by Siddhartha Avila.
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Young Lions Roar in November

Monday October 17, 2011

Do you have what it takes to be the leader of the pride?  Registration is now open for the Young Lions Tournament, run by the American Go Honor Society (AGHS).  Last year’s winner in the dan division, Vincent Zhuang 6d, went on to represent the US at the World Youth Go Championships.  Will this year’s tourney predict our next US Champions as well?  The tourney is scheduled for November 12-13.  Participants must be 18 or younger and have solid, KGS or AGA ranks. All matches will be played on KGS in the AGHS Tournament room (Room List –> Tournaments). Prizes will be awarded to the top three in each division. Spectators are welcome, and the E-J will highlight some of the more interesting match ups.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

2nd Bingsheng Cup Results: Park Jieun Wins

Saturday October 15, 2011

The 2nd Bingsheng Cup came and went this week and Park Jieun 9P chalked up another international win. The Bingsheng Cup is a competition for the strongest female go players worldwide. First held last year, the tournament takes place at Qionglong Mountain, Suzhou, China and is also called the Qionglong Cup by some people. China, Japan and Korea, of course, fielded strong teams. However, being a truly international competition, competitors from other regions were also able to qualify. North America was represented by the USA’s Feng Yun 9P, who runs the Feng Yun Go School in New Jersey (she won the North American qualifier tournament for the Bingshen by defeating Yinli Wang 6D; Cathy Li 1P lost to Feng Yun by forfeit in the final on September 28. ). Joanne Missingham 5P once again played for Oceania and Natalaia Kovaleva 5D for Europe. Unfortunately all three of these players were knocked out in the first round and Missingham wasn’t able to repeat her impressive feat from the 1st Bingsheng Cup. In last year’s tournament Missingham fought all the way to the final, only losing to Korea’s Park Jieun 9P. This year, Park eventually faced China’s Tang Yi 2P in the final on October 13, 2011, but once again Park was too strong.

Feng Yun 9P’s game is below. More games and photos are available in Go Game Guru’s 2nd Bingsheng Cup report.

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- Jingning; based on her original article at Go Game Guru. Photos: Left; Yu Zhiying 2P (left) plays Feng Yun 9P. Right; Park Jieun 9P in the final.

Moore and Yan Win AGF College Scholarships

Monday October 10, 2011

D’mitri Moore, of Detroit, MI, and Jasmine Yan, of  Edison, NJ, have each won $1,000 towards their college expenses, from the American Go Foundation.  The scholarship recognizes high school students who have served as important youth organizers and promoters for the go community, and is awarded annually.  Applications for next year’s scholarship are due by Nov. 20, more information can be found on the AGF website.  Moore launched a go club at his high school in inner city Detroit, and stuck with it through thick and thin over the next four years.  Moore’s essay for the scholarship speaks to his passion:“I believe that most inner-city children statistically fail to achieve, not because of their inability to comprehend, or actually do the school work, but because they are bored, because they are not being challenged on a level which forces them to think in a different manner in order to solve problems. The first person I introduced go to was one of these types.  Everyday, when we would have nothing to do, I would teach the rules of go to this student and everyday he would steadily improve bit by bit. His intrigue of the game spread like a wildfire and his drive to one-day defeat me spurred him to want to play and study more. A connection had been made and every good go player knows that once you have a strong, connected group of stones, you have to make extensions from it in order to amass more territory. When I told him that I wanted to start a club at Renaissance High in order to get more people (specifically youth) in the city of Detroit to play, he was very determined to help look for a sponsor while I filled out the paperwork. Within our first 3 months, our group size tripled and all of the kids who may have never ever noticed each other walking down the hallway were connecting and bonding like they had been friends for years.”  Moore entered his school in the AGHS School Teams Tourney, and was able to place fourth in the Jr. Varsity Division at their first tournament.

Jasmine Yan began teaching go as early as fifth grade, and launched go clubs at  both her middle, and high schools.  She led both teams to compete in the School Teams Tourney, and also became active as a teacher.  When the opportunity to volunteer came, Yan immediately joined the AGHS, and eventually was elected President.  In addition to running and organizing national tournaments, she helped with promotional efforts, and continued to teach locally the whole time. She first discovered go as a child in China, and wrote in her essay: “A few weeks after we had come back from China, I saw an advertisement for Feng Yun Go School, and I begged my parents to sign me up. However, in the first session, I was terrified to discover that I was the only girl, as well as the weakest in the class; for several weeks, I lost every game I played. Yet, during those difficult times, something about the game of Go persuaded me to keep playing. Nine years later, I have improved from 30 kyu to my current rank of 4 dan.”  Not concerned solely with her own development, Yan also began teaching go at her Chinese school.  “For the next three years, I taught the go class in FCD, with about ten to fifteen kids in each class. The first year was somewhat of an experiment for me. I learned that all the kids had different comprehension levels; some would understand the concepts taught immediately, and others took longer. Eventually, the kids in my class had ranks ranging from 1 dan to 25 kyu.”  Yan also represented her country, as part of the US National Team in the first Mind Sports Games in Beijing, in 2008.   - EJ Youth Editor Paul Barchilon.  Photos: Top Left: D’mitri Moore; Top Right: Jasmine Yan.


Crystal Lake High Students Learn Go

Monday October 10, 2011

Crystal Lake South High School Chinese Club, in Illiinois,  launched its first event of the semester with  an introduction to go (weiqi) by Chicago teacher and weiqi enthusiast  Simon Xinming Guo, on Sept. 22nd.  Guo came at the invitation of Ms. Lin Hsieh, the Chinese language teacher at the school.  Ms. Hsieh hopes to use Weiqi to help her students to understand Chinese culture and  to learn  strategic thinking. Altogether, about 110 students from Crystal Lake South and Cary-Grove High school learned about weiqi in their Chinese language classes. Check out Guo’s page for the event for more info. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Xinming Guo.

Boz Slams Dr. K, Says China’s Policy “More Akin To Chess”

Monday October 10, 2011

by Roy Laird
Earlier this year, we covered the skeptical reaction to Henry Kissinger’s claim, in his new book On China, that principles of go — or weiqi, as it’s known in China –  influence Chinese military and political thinking. (Click here to view the article. ) The Economist, The Wall Street Journal and others found the comparison shallow and superfluous. Noted go author Peter Shotwell disputed the historical basis for Kissinger’s assumptions here. Now Richard Bozulich, the founder of Ishi Press and Kiseido and author or publisher of dozens of the finest go books in English, goes even farther, in an essay available for download exclusively on the AGA’s Bob High Memorial Library. In Richard Bozulich on Kissinger on China and Go, he presents a set of facts to support the view that in fact China pursues particularly unreasonable, unyielding policies, while the US and even chess-playing Russia sometimes apply “commonsense” principles that can also be found in go, but do not originate there. Whether or not one agrees, it’s a well-made case and a fascinating read. I especially enjoyed a section intended for non-players in which the “commonsense” aspects of strategic concepts like aji and yosu-miru seem to come clearly into focus, even for a non-player. We eagerly await Dr. Kissinger’s response . . .

Categories: U.S./North America
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In Memoriam: Rick Peterson, 1958-2011

Monday October 10, 2011

Virginia and Washington DC players mourn the passing of longtime player Rick Peterson, who passed away at his home earlier this year. Rick first learned go from his fraternity brothers as a student at Northwestern University. He played throughout his life and is remembered fondly by players who knew him in Milwaukee, San Francisco, Durham, Chapel Hill and finally in Lexington, VA. He was especially proud to teach go to his son Cobb in the last few years of his life while battling brain cancer; Cobb now plays regularly. One of his last projects was refinishing a gorgeous old goban he bought on eBay, to pass down to his son. From his obituary: “In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you hug the people you love and make a donation to your favorite charity.” Rick’s wife Mary sent a “Go Angel” donation of $1000 in his memory to The American Go Foundation. “We are honored to get Rick’s help; now we can spread his go legacy even further.” said AGF President Terry Benson.

Categories: U.S./North America
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Jung Hoon Lee 7d Wins Rocky Mountain Fall Go Tournament

Monday October 3, 2011

Jung Hoon Lee 7d won the Rocky Mountain Fall Go Tournament on Saturday, October 1, which was held at the Highlands Ranch Public Library in Colorado. The 41 players ranged from 25 kyu to 7 dan.In the top section, Jerry Mao 7d took 2nd place. In the dan/single-digit-kyu group, Michael Wanek 3d took 1st place, George Angelos 8k was 2nd, and and Larry LeJeune 3k was 3rd. In the double-digit-kyu section, Hannah Jung 17k was 1st, Abby Cupec 25k was 2nd, and Alan Newman 25k was 3rd.  Both Cupec and Newman were playing in their first tournaments. “The Springs Go Club donated money for the tournament prizes in memory of  their long time member Leonard Kane who passed away last week,” reports organizer David Weiss.
photo: dan section, by Larry LeJeune

Categories: U.S./North America
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Osman Tops Small But Spirited Field in VT

Monday October 3, 2011

A small — 8 players – field nonetheless enjoyed “a fun and spirited go tournament” in Middlebury, VT on October 2. The eight players represented Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, reports TD Pete Schumer. Three players finished with 3-1 records.  Based on SOS tie breaking, 1st place went to Eric Osman 2d, second place to Josh Ackerman 1k, and third to David Felcan 1d. Lunch and snacks were provided as well as trophies and prizes for all participants.

Categories: U.S./North America
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Ing’s Youth Cup October 23rd

Monday October 3, 2011

The 14th annual Ing’s Youth Cup Goe tournament will be held October  23rd, at the Chinese Cultural Center, in Sunnyvale California.  The popular tourney is organized by Mingjiu Jiang 7p, and sponsored by the Ing Foundation.  Last year’s event drew over 100 youth, who enjoyed prizes and trophies in ten different bands, sorted by rank.  There is also a 13×13 tournament for newer players.  Registration is $35, including lunch, but goes up by $10 if you register after October 10th.  For more information, and to register, go to Gomasters.com.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo:  Last year’s tourney, from the Go Masters site.