American Go E-Journal » Go News

Kansai to Host First Japan Go Congress

Monday January 18, 2016

The first Japan Go Congress will be held July 15 through 18 in Takarazuka, Japan, and organised by the Kansai Ki-in. In addition to a main2016.01.17_Japan Go Congress tournament, the Congress — at which 200-300 participants are expected — will offer a variety of side events such as lectures, teaching games with professionals, and other traditional Japanese games. Famous for its Grand Theater, Takarazuka is also known as the “city of opera.” Situated northwest of Osaka, it is outside of typical urban tension, but still easily accessible. Available accommodations include Daikin Dormitory, the Takarazuka Inn Hotel and the Takarazuka Hotel; click here for details. “The Kansai Ki-in warmly welcomes players from abroad,” reports their Go Congress Team.

Just before the Japan Go Congress, the 4th Osaka Go Camp — also organized by the Kansai Ki-in — will be held from June 26 to July 14. Last year there were more than 70 participants at the camp, where “You can train with professionals in a cozy environment and do sight-seeing,” report organizers.

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Categories: Japan
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Your Move/Readers Write: Weiqi Teacher Needed in Maryland; Go Photo; Turing, Mrs Morcom and Go; Taranu’s Timing; Wrong Rank; Go in WSJ

Monday January 18, 2016

Weiqi Teacher Needed in Maryland: The Hope Chinese School  is looking for a go teacher for a Saturday afternoon class, reports Edward Zhang. “It’s a great school with several hundred students registered.” The class is at Winston Churchill High School, 11300 Gainsborough Road, Potomac, MD 20854. Hourly rate is at least $23; contact Ms. He 703-585-7164.

Go Photo: “Young Buddhas playing the game we love,” writes Richard Simon. Snapped January 08 on Roosevelt Ave. near Main St., 2016.01.17_simon-go-figuresFlushing, NY in a store window by Felice Simon.

Turing, Mrs Morcom and Go: “Not sure if anyone has submitted this one,” writes John Hager, “but in the book ‘Alan Turing: The Enigma‘ (chapter 3) it mentions that Turing taught his friend’s mother, Mrs. Morcom, to play go. “Also mentioned (is that) not much go (was) played at Princeton when Alan Turing was in residence.”
Speaking of Princeton, we have it on good authority that this year’s New Jersey Open — the 57th — will be held March 19-20; details should be posted on our calendar soon.

Taranu’s Timing: “Aren’t you forgetting Romania’s Catalin Taranu?” writes Michael Alford. (Our “Finland’s Tormanen becomes pro shodan, 12/30 Power Report” said that Tormanen “is the first Westerner to become a professional at the Nihon Ki-in since the late Hans Pietsch 6P in 1997.”) “I think Catalin became Nihon Kiin pro in 1998. Catalin is 5p.”
The Igo Nenkan (the Yearbook put out by the Ki-in) just gives 1997 as the year both Pietsch and Taranu became pros. Go World 79 (page 9) has more details. Catalin Taranu won the qualifying tournament at the Nagoya branch of the Nihon Ki-in and became pro 1-dan in April (probably as of April 1, as that is the usual practice, but this is not specified). Go World says: “Catalin was followed by Hans Pietsch at the Tokyo branch of the Nihon Ki-in. . . . Hans was given special permission to become professional shodan and he made his debut in late April.” So Hans is the most recent before Antti, though just by a matter of weeks. Btw, Catalin, like Michael Redmond, became pro the legitimate way, strictly through competition. (They are the only two. None of the Western pros at the Korean Ki-in made it through competition.) Hans Pietsch, Manfred Wimmer, and James Kerwin were all given special permission to become pro. However, the probationary status is regularized when you gain promotion, as Wimmer and Hans did. Hans earned promotion to 4-dan on merit.
– John Power

Wrong Rank: “…this is mostly tongue in cheek,” writes Keith Arnold. “In your nice thank you article (AGA Pro Tourney: Final Results and Team Credits) you got one of the ranks wrong. You list ‘Eric Lui 7d’…missed your first chance to say ’1p’ Had to do it.”

Go in WSJ: “Here’s a nice article freshly enpixellated in the Wall Street Journal on go and computers,” writes Matt Bengtson.

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Categories: U.S./North America
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Strong North American Go Team Headed for Huai’an for Inaugural IMSA Games

Wednesday January 13, 2016

2015.01.09_Ryan-Li-DSC_0101In February, a strong North American Go team will head to Huai-An in Eastern China’s Jiangsu Province, for the first ever International Mind Sports Association Elite Mind Games. Mingjiu Jiang 7p and Eric Lui 1p of the US, along with Ryan Li 1p and Sarah Yu 6d of Canada will play from Feb. 24 to March 4 in the city of five million. The three men will play in a men’s team competition against teams from Europe, China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, while Yu, who just competed in Los Angeles as the first woman candidate for AGA pro, will play in a 12-player woman’s individual tournament. Yu and a male player will also take part in a three-round pair go knockout. The IMSA Elite Mind Games are similar in format to the SportAccord World Mind Games, which took place each December from 2011 to 2014 but not in 2015.

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Second Australian Go Congress Starts Friday

Wednesday January 13, 2016

The second Australian Go Congress kicks off this Friday, January 15 and runs through the 19th at the Sydney Parramatta Novotel in Parramatta,2016.01.13_australian-congress NSW, Australia. The main tournament will be played over five days; in addition there will be other competitions, lessons and opportunities to play simultaneous games against some of the world’s top professional players. There is a substantial prize and gift pool across different divisions.

The Congress will be held in the heart of Parramatta, close to the central business district, restaurants and cafés. It is also close to Parramatta’s shopping centre and public transport. It takes just 30 minutes by train to reach Sydney’s Harbour Bridge, Opera House, harbour, casino and more.

To assist people on their first visit to Sydney, Congress organizers will also provide a free city tour. Click here for Congress details.

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Categories: Australia
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Mark Lee wins Jin Chen Memorial Tournament in Seattle

Tuesday January 12, 2016

Jin Chen with Mark LeeMark Lee won the sixth annual Jin Chen Memorial Tournament, held at the Seattle Go Center on January 3.  Lee (in yellow shirt) was visiting from California; readers may remember that he was undefeated in the U.S. Open in 2014.  Dong (David) Ma placed 2nd in the Open Section of the Jin Chen, which had eight players.  The Handicapped Sections had 20 players.   The Dan Handicapped Section was won by Zhihong Yao, with Dengda (Dan) Tang placing 2nd.  The SDK section was won by John Johnson, with Eric Backus placing 2nd.  The DDK  section was won by Elan Ma, with Michael Hixenbaugh placing second.  Elan Ma, who was undefeated in her games, also won the Youth Prize.  
- photo/report by Brian Allen

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Categories: U.S./North America
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AGA Pro Tourney: Final Results and Team Credits

Saturday January 9, 2016

In the final set of games in the AGA Professional Qualification Tournament on Saturday morning, Andrew Lu defeated Daniel Gourdeau and 2016.01.06_player-group-shotJeremy Chiu beat Sarah Yu. Lu took third place and a seeded place in the next pro tournament, Gourdeau was fourth, Chiu is fifth and Yu sixth.

Thanks to the entire E-Journal team for bringing this week-long event to the world. Dennis Wheeler not only did his usual stellar job recording games, cleaning up game records and helping manage the team, but took on new responsibilities for producing our series of game highlight videos, which I think you’ll agree are an excellent addition to our coverage. The game recording team included regular LA volunteers Richard Dolen and Joe Cepiel, with the welcome addition of Greg Kulevich and Esther Jun, who both did a terrific job. The commentary team included Myungwan Kim 9P, Tyler Oyakawa 6d, Norman Tsai 7d and I-han Lui 7d, who all did excellent work drawing out key lessons for our series of brief videos. Andrew Jackson provided tech support for the videos and Steve Colburn kept the tournament page and crosstab updated. Thanks to Akane Negishi and her team of admins at KGS for their support, as always.

Many thanks as well to the staff of the Hotel Normandie, its architect and go enthusiast Jingbo Lou and the folks at Cassell’s who generously provided not only a calm and elegant venue but all the help we needed and water and coffee when we were thirsty.

2016.01.09_ej-teamSpecial thanks to Tournament Director Jeff Shaevel for ensuring the event’s smooth operation throughout the week — as he has each year — and a very special thanks to AGA president Andy Okun, who not only coordinated the entire event with Myungwan Kim 9P, but was always there taking care of the myriad details, both tiny and big, to make the event a success, including assuming game recording duties when needed.

Of course, the biggest thanks goes to the eight players who gave it their all this week — Eric Lui 7d, Ben Lockhart 7d (who also participated in a video commentary), Aaron Ye 7d, Andrew Lu 7d, Daniel Gourdeau 6d, Jeremy Chiu 6d, Sarah Yu 6d, and Manuel Velasco 5d — they are all a credit to the game and an inspiration to go players of all levels.

Finally, if you’re interested in being on the E-Journal team at future events — it’s a lot of fun and a great way to improve your game — send us an email at journal@usgo.org.
- Chris Garlock, Managing Editor, American Go E-Journal; photo by Garlock

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Eric Lui Wins AGA Pro Tourney to Become Latest US Professional

Friday January 8, 2016

For Eric Lui, the fourth time was the charm. Lui (left) has played in all four AGA Professional Qualification Tournaments, losing to Ryan Li in last year’s final, but on Friday 2016.01.08_lui-ye-finalafternoon he became the American Go Association’s fifth professional, defeating Aaron Ye by resignation to close out a near-flawless performance this week with a 9-1 score, his only loss a half-pointer in the first round. “It’s been a long week,” Lui told the E-Journal immediately after clinching his win, “but it feels really good. The field was stronger this year.” Lui said that he fully intends to pursue a career as a professional. “Now I have some decisions to make,” he said, smiling tiredly. “Not right away, but soon.” For amateur players who want to get stronger, the new professional’s advice was to “Play a lot of games. Preferably in person, and fast games.”

“Eric’s determination and steadiness are a real inspiration,” said AGA President Andy Okun, who was on hand all week at the Los Angeles tournament.  “It heartens me to see his efforts rewarded.”

Ye, in his first pro qualifier, turned in a strong performance with an 8-4 record, taking second place and earning a slot as a seed in the next qualification tournament. In the lower bracket, Ben Lockhart clinched 7th place by beating Manuel Velasco, who finished in 8th place. Andrew Lu defeated Daniel Gourdeau on Friday afternoon, so they’ll play a third-game decider on Saturday morning, as will Sarah Yu and Jeremy Chiu. Lu and Gourdeau will battle for third place, while Yu and Chiu will compete for fifth;  the games start at 9:30a Pacific Time on KGS. Full tournament details here; click here for video game highlights.
- report/photo by Chris Garlock

 

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Antti Törmänen to play Hajin Lee in online exhibition match

Friday January 8, 2016

Newly-minted professional Antti Törmänen 1P will play an exhibition match against Hajin Lee 3P on OGS this Saturday, January 9, at 11p EST2016.01.08_ogs-anti-haylee(4a UTC). Lee, a Korean 3P and secretary of the International Go Federation, is well known to western go players for her entertaining and instructional YouTube channel, where she’s known as “Haylee.” Antti Törmänen is the first Western player to be granted professional status by the Nihon Ki-in since Hans Pietsch in 1997. He offers paid lessons on OGS and publishes a blog chronicling his go career. Calvin Sun, North American 1P and Stephen Hu, AGA 5 dan (right) will provide live commentary on the game. Click here to see a promotional video for the match on YouTube. To watch the game and commentary, log into OGS and click on the banner links posted at the top right of the page.

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Categories: Europe
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AGA Pro Tourney report: Eric Lui into finals, awaits opponent

Thursday January 7, 2016

Thursday morning’s session at the AGA Professional Qualification Tournament  featured just two games, Ben Lockhart vs Aaron Ye and Sarah2016.01.07_Yu-Velasco-analysis Yu vs Andrew Lu, in a battle to move onto the semi-finals. Lockhart had an early lead but then played a couple of slow moves and Ye was able to pull ahead; a huge semeai then developed and Lockhart missed the critical move to win the capturing race (click here to see Myungwan Kim’s brief video commentary). Sarah Yu, who had played tengen in her Wednesday night match against Lu, played a similar center move Thursday, explaining afterwards that she felt the 7.5 komi was heavy and this would lead to more favorable josekis. However, she failed to make effective use of her unusual move and Lu gained the advantage. This game also developed into a crowd-pleasing semeai (click here for Myungwan Kim’s video commentary).

In the afternoon matchups, Eric Lui defeated Andrew Lu by resignation, advancing to the semi-finals. Daniel Gourdeau won against Aaron Ye; he lost against Ye in the round-robin, so they’ll play again on Friday morning to determine who advances to the final with Lui. Ben Lockhart beat Jeremy Chiu, tying their match at 1-1; they’ll play on Friday morning. Sarah Yu beat Manuel Velasco, knocking him into the bottom bracket; she’ll await the winner in the Lockhart-Chiu game. The live KGS broadcast will start at 9:30a PST.
- report/photo by Chris Garlock, with technical support from Dennis Wheeler. photo (l-r): Sarah Yu, Danny Ko, Manuel Velasco, Daniel Gourdeau, Andrew Lu and Ben Lockhart.
CORRECTION (1/8): Our original report did not indicate that Eric Lui is in the finals and that the winner of the Gourdeau-Ye game will advance to the finals. 

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AGA Pro Tourney Moves into Knock-out Section

Wednesday January 6, 2016

The round-robin section of the AGA Professional Qualification Tournament wrapped up Wednesday morning with few surprises except for 2016.01.07_knock-out-startssecond-seeded Ben Lockhart’s 7th-place finish. Eric Lui was first, Aaron Ye second, Daniel Gourdeau third, then Andrew Lu in fourth, Sarah Yu was fifth, Jeremy Chiu sixth, and Manuel Velasco eighth.

The knockout section commenced on Wednesday afternoon as Los Angeles enjoyed a second straight day of rain, although of course the eight top-ranked North American go players at the Hotel Normandie were oblivious — or at least impervious –to the weather. The knockout section is a best-of-three, with the first game having already been played in the round-robin. Eric Lui had beaten Manuel Velasco in the round-robin and had no trouble with him on Wednesday afternoon, knocking Velasco down into the lower bracket. Daniel Gourdeau’s win against Jeremy Chiu secured his place in the upper bracket as well. Sarah Yu had lost to Andrew Lu in the round robin, but won on Wednesday; they’ll play to advance on Thursday morning. And Ben Lockhart, who had lost to Aaron Ye in the round-robin, beat him by a point and a half in the knockout, forcing a third game on Thursday morning. Both games will start at 9:30a PST on KGS.

A brief video of Myungwan Kim 9P’s commentary on the Ye-Lockhart game has been posted on the AGA’s YouTube channel.
- report/photo by Chris Garlock

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