American Go E-Journal » Go News

AlphaGo Edges Lee Sedol in Game 5 to Win Google DeepMind Challenge 4-1

Tuesday March 15, 2016

After a loss in Game 4 of the Google DeepMind Challenge, and a move early on that looked like a mistake, but could have been a creative and effective new move, AlphaGo on Tuesday won Game 5 against the legendary Lee Sedol 9P. This final game of the match was close until the very end, with commentators going back and forth about who was leading. But after 280 moves,2016.03.15_hassabis-cap down a couple points, Lee resigned, giving the Google AI program a 4-1 match record and achieving a major milestone for artificial intelligence a decade earlier than many predicted.

“It was difficult to say at what point AlphaGo was ahead or behind,” said English commentator Michael Redmond 9P. “AlphaGo made 2016.03.15_alphago-teamwhat looked like a mistake with move 48, similar to the mistake in Game Four in the middle of the board. After that AlphaGo played very well in the middle of the board, and the game developed into a long, very difficult end game…AlphaGo has the potential to be a huge study tool for us professionals, when it’s available for us to play at home.” Korean commentator Kim Seongryong 9P added that “Just like the scientists, go players are always trying to find new methods and approaches. And we are so happy when we find them. This Challenge Match has brought us go players to new areas we’ve never explored. We are now seeing a lot more interest in playing go. And even in one week, I feel like my go playing has improved.”

2016.03.15_deepmind“I just want to say thanks to the entire DeepMind AlphaGo team,” said Chris Garlock, Managing Editor of the American Go E-Journal, and the other half of the English commentary team. “This match… the drama, the historic aspect, the quality of the games, the brilliance of AlphaGo, the brilliance of Lee Sedol, and then the amount of media coverage. This is a gift to go. This is going to do a lot to bring go to new audiences. We could not have dreamed this up any better, and the match delivered beautiful games. This match has done what go always does: brings people together in friendship and cooperation, and that, like the game itself, is beautiful.”

With AlphaGo’s victory, Google DeepMind will donate the $1 million in prize money to UNICEF, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) charities, and go organizations.

Click here for complete game commentaries, as well as brief game highlights for each round.
photos: (top right) Google DeepMind CEO Demis Hassabis with Michael Redmond (l) and Chris Garlock (r); (middle left) AlphaGo team takes a bow.

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School Teams Tourney Deadline March 23

Monday March 14, 2016

SchoolTeamTournamentThe registration deadline for the School Team Tournament (STT) is right around the corner. “The STT is one of the most interactive and competitive tournaments for students in high school or below,” says American Go Honor Society President Yunxuan Li. “It draws many schools every year and has always been enjoyed by young players. All you need to do is gather 3 players from your school and sign up to compete!” To register, click here.

Registration will end March 23, and the tournament will take place on KGS on April 2 & 3. The 1st round starts at 9am PST, and the 2nd  at 1pm. Rounds 3 and 4 follow the same schedule the next day. Time settings are 45 minutes main time and 30 seconds of byo-yomi 5 times. Please remember to indicate your accurate AGA rank or your KGS rank. If you register with your KGS rank, please make sure you have at least 10 games on your account before the tournament. “Which team will be the next to win top honor for their school this year? We will find out soon,” adds Li.

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Michael Redmond on AlphaGo, Lee Sedol and Honinbo Shuwa

Monday March 14, 2016

by Chris Garlock2016.03.14_redmond-deepmind-team

During a long walk around Seoul on Monday — the day off before the Google DeepMind Challenge final game Tuesday
between Lee Sedol 9P and AlphaGo — Michael Redmond 9P was still thinking about the game from the previous day, in which Lee had finally snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. In reviewing the game carefully, he was convinced that Lee’s “brilliant” move 78 — which had won the game — didn’t actually work. Somehow, though, it had prompted a fatal mistake by AlphaGo, which top members of the DeepMind team were still trying to understand, and had reviewed key points with Redmond after the match and then again at breakfast Monday morning. While Redmond was fascinated with the move’s many complicated variations and trying to understand what had happened to AlphaGo, he was also thinking about Honinbo Shuwa, the 19th century Japanese professional go player admired by modern professionals for his light, flexible play, and mastery of “amashi,” taking territory early and then invading or reducing the opponent’s resulting area of influence. Which is exactly the strategy employed by Lee Sedol against AlphaGo in the fourth game on Sunday. “Shuwa would just jump into huge moyos and lay waste to them,” Redmond said as we walked past the Changgyeonggung Palace. “He’d just be kind of floating around there and still taking territory while being attacked. It was just sort of impossible to kill Shuwa’s stones.” Lee Sedol was doing things a little differently, Redmond noted. “He was taking profit and taking profit and then invading at the last minute. He’s been trying this strategy since Game 2 and it hasn’t been working but it finally did in Game 4.” In the final game, in which Lee will take black, “I think that Lee has the idea that he can use the amashi style, which is usually used when playing white, to take territory, allow AlphaGo to build a big moyo and then jump in.”
Garlock is the Managing Editor of the American Go E-Journal. photo: Redmond (left) with DeepMind team members David Silver (next to Redmond), Chris Maddison (second from right) and Thore Graepel (far right), reviewing Game 4 Sunday night.
Click here for Redmond’s Match 3 Game Highlights and here for the Match 4 Livestream commentary by Michael Redmond 9P with Chris Garlock. Click here for complete commentaries on games 1-4, as well as brief game highlights for each round.
The fifth and final game in the 5-game Lee Sedol-AlphaGo match will be Tuesday, March 15, 1P KST (Monday night 9p PST, midnight EST). The match will be livestreamed on DeepMind’s YouTube channel with commentary by Redmond and Garlock. And catch Myungwan Kim 9P’s commentary with Andrew Jackson starting at 10P PST on the AGA’s YouTube Channel. 

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AlphaGo-Lee Sedol Match: Game 4 News Coverage

Sunday March 13, 2016

Lee Sedol defeats AlphaGo in masterful comeback – Game 42016.03.14_AlphaGo-Lee-Sedol-game-4-6-300x453
Go Game Guru

South Korean Gets ‘Priceless’ Victory Over Computer in Go Match
New York Times

 

After Three Losses, Master Go Player Scores A Win Against Computer
NPR

Go Grandmaster Lee Sedol Grabs Consolation Win Against Google’s AI
Wired

Go champion Lee Se-dol strikes back to beat Google’s DeepMind AI for first time
The Verge

Go Champion Beats AlphaGo Software on Fourth Try
Wall Street Journal

Go champion notches first victory against Google computer
Financial Times

In the Age of Google DeepMind, Do the Young Go Prodigies of Asia Have a Future?
The New Yorker

Is Artificial Intelligence Being Oversold?
Scientific American

 

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Lee Sedol Notches Win Against AlphaGo in DeepMind Challenge Game 4

Sunday March 13, 2016

Lee Sedol 9P made a comeback Sunday after three consecutive losses, to beat AlphaGo in the fourth game of the Google 2016.03.13-lee-sedol-round4DeepMind Challenge. Playing as white, Lee won by resignation after 180 moves. AlphaGo held a strong position for the first half of the game, but commentators noted that Lee Sedol played a brilliant move 78, followed by a mistake by AlphaGo at move 79. “Today’s game was another example of AlphaGo playing a very interesting, good game,” said English commentator Michael Redmond 9P. “However, move 78 by Lee Sedol was really brilliant — and enabled him to win.“ Song Taegon 9P, the Korean commentator, said that “It seems Lee Sedol can now read AlphaGo better and has a better understanding of how AlphaGo moves. For the 5th match, it will be a far closer battle than before since we know each better. 2016.03.12_demis-reviewsProfessional go players said that they became more interested in playing go after witnessing AlphaGo’s innovative moves. People started to rethink about moves that were previously regarded as undesirable or bad moves. AlphaGo can help us think outside of the box.“ As in the previous games in this match, Lee used up all of his time and two periods of byō-yomi overtime, playing nearly two hours on his last period. With the match score 3-1, AlphaGo has already secured victory in the Google DeepMind Challenge Match, but Sunday’s loss heightens the drama going into the final game, Game Five, which will be played on Tuesday, March 15 at 1pm KST.
photo (left): AlphaGo’s Demis Hassabis and David Silver review Game 4 with Michael Redmond 9P; photo by Chris Garlock. photo (right): Lee Sedol, courtesy Geordie Wood for Wired.
Click here for Michael Redmond’s Match 3 Game Highlights and here for the Match 4 Livestream commentary by Michel Redmond 9P with Chris Garlock. Click here for complete commentaries on games 1-4, as well as brief game highlights for each round.
The fifth and final game in the 5-game Lee Sedol-AlphaGo match will be Tuesday, March 15, 1P KST (Monday night 9p PST, midnight EST). The match will be livestreamed on DeepMind’s YouTube channel with commentary by Redmond and Garlock. And catch Myungwan Kim 9P’s commentary with Andrew Jackson starting at 10P PST on the AGA’s YouTube Channel. 

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AlphaGo-Lee Sedol Match: Game 3 News Coverage

Saturday March 12, 2016

Google’s AI Takes Historic Match Against Go Champ With Third Straight Win2016.03.13_AlphaGo-Lee-Sedol-game-3-game-over-550x310
Wired

AlphaGo beats Lee Sedol in third consecutive Go game
The Guardian

Artificial intelligence: Google’s AlphaGo beats Go master Lee Se-dol
BBC

AlphaGo shows its true strength in 3rd victory against Lee Sedol
Go Game Guru

Google’s Go Computer Beats Top-Ranked Human
Fortune

Google’s A.I. Beats Human Champ at Go for Third Straight Time2016.03.12_AlphaGo-Lee-Sedol-game-3-Chris-Garlock-Michael-Redmond-550x367
Slate

AlphaGo is the official winner in landmark man vs machine Go match
ZDNet

AlphaGo beats Lee Se-dol again to take Google DeepMind Challenge series
The Verge

Match 3 Livestream – Google DeepMind Challenge Match: Lee Sedol vs AlphaGo
Commentary by Michael Redmond 9P with Chris Garlock

Alpha no Go – After the Match (manga)
imgur

The Sadness and Beauty of Watching Google’s AI Play Go (Game 2)
Wired

 

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San Diego & SDGC Join Forces to Watch Lee Sedol – AlphaGo Game 3

Saturday March 12, 2016

Seventeen people attended a go house-party on Friday evening to watch the third game in the Lee Sedol – AlphaGo match.2016.03.12_San-Diego-party Members of the San Diego Go Club and the UCSD Go club gathered at the SDGC president’s home to try to root the human on to victory. “It was almost like a go sports bar,” reports  San Diego Go Club President Ted Terpstra, “with two big-screen TVs, a couple of Macs, iPads and a bevy of cell phones all tuned to the action. The upstairs’ TV was turned on to the DeepMind YouTube analysis by Chris Garlock and Michael Redmond 9P while downstairs some were watching the AGA YouTube channel featuring Andrew Jackson and Cho Hyeyeon 9P. Gobans were scattered around flat surfaces so that the spectators could look at variations during the match. Pizza and pop supplied by the American Go Association added to the party atmosphere. Play was well past the four-hour mark when Lee Sedol resigned and lost the  game and the match. The last of the disappointed and weary group ambled out at 12:30 a.m. PST.”
photo by Ted Terpstra

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AlphaGo beats Lee Sedol again to take Google DeepMind Challenge series

Saturday March 12, 2016

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The Power Report: Iyama’s new record for prize money & other go stats

Friday March 11, 2016

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Iyama’s new record for prize money: Iyama Yuta has set a new record for most prize money won, which is not surprising, considering he won six of the top seven titles last year, as well as the Agon Kiriyama Cup. This is the fifth year in a row he has topped the list and the fourth year in a row his total was over 100 million yen. The top ten at the Nihon Ki-in are given below.
1. Iyama Yuta: 172,124,104 yen (about $1,565,000)
2. Yamashita Keigo 9P: 42,127,900
3. Takao Shinji 9P: 31,807,992
4. Ida Atsushi Judan: 22,491,700
5. Xie Yimin, Women’s Honinbo: 21,098,245
6. Kono Rin 9P: 16,998,300
7. Kyo Kagen 3P: 15,647,697
8. Cho U 9P: 15,596,200
9. Ichiriki Ryo 7P: 15,117,497
10. Hane Naoki 9P: 13,398,000

Most wins (Nihon Ki-in)
1. Iyama Yuta, Kyo Kagen: 41-10
3. Shibano Toramaru 2P: 39-9; Ichiriki Ryo 7P: 39-19
5. Yamashita Keigo 9P: 38-22
6. Motoki Katsuya 7P: 34-12
7. Ogata Masaki 9P: 33-13; Kono Rin 9P: 33-15-1 no result; Son Makoto 4P: 33-16
10. Mutsuura Yuta 2P: 32-13; Ida Atsushi Judan: 32-22

Top woman players were:
14. Fujisawa Rina 3P: 28-23
20. Suzuki Ayumi 6P: 26-22
24. O Keii, Aizu Cup-holder: 24-14

Best winning percentage
1. Shibano Toramaru 2P: 81.25% (39-9)
2. Iyama Yuta, Kyo Kagen: 80.39%
4. Motoki Katsuya: 73.91%
5. Ogata Masaki 9P: 71.74% (33-13)
6. Cho Riyu 9P (30-12), Uchida Shuhei 7P (25-10): 71.43%
8. Mutsuura Yuta 2P: 71.11% (32-13)
9. Akiyama Jiro 9P, Terayama Rei 4P: 71.05% (27-11)

Most successive wins
1. Iyama Yuta: 24
2. Shibano Toramaru: 16
3. Ida Atsushi: 13
4. Uchida Shuhei 7P: 12
5. Shida Tatsuya 7P: 11
6. Awaji Shuzo 9P, Shida Tatsuya, Hirata Tomoya 7P: 10

Kansai Ki-in
Most wins
1. Yo Seiki 7P: 47
2. Yuki Satoshi 9P: 40

Best winning percentage
1. Furuya Yutaka 8P: 80%
2. Imamura Toshiya 9P: 78.95%
3. Hon Seisen 2P: 77.78%
4. U Bai 1P: 76.67%%

Most successive wins
1. Yun Chun-ho 3P: 16
2. Sakai Hideyuki 8P, U Bai 1P: 12
4. Yo Seiki: 11

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Michael Redmond on AlphaGo-Lee Sedol Games 1 & 2 (plus his advice for Game 3)

Friday March 11, 2016

Michael Redmond 9P has been providing the English game commentary for the Lee Sedol-AlphaGo match, with American Go E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock. On Friday, the break day before the match resumes on Saturday with Game 3, Redmond sat down with Garlock to recap the first two games and look ahead to the critical third game on Saturday. 

Game 1: Underestimating AlphaGo: Lee Sedol, taking black, played a really unusual opening in the first game. I2016.03.11_AlphaGo-Lee-Sedol-first-move-550x369 think he had a plan to try to throw the computer off course by playing an opening it didn’t have in its’ database. But I’ve been talking to the Deep Mind programmers and it’s not actually a database but machine learning that recognizes patterns, so AlphaGo doesn’t need to have an exact match and it doesn’t really matter if some of the moves are slightly different, so AlphaGo can judge the situation, which is quite different from the usual computer programs and closer to the human way of thinking. So Lee’s plan to play something that AlphaGo hadn’t seen before just didn’t work. And in fact, Black 27 was an overplay and Lee got in trouble himself and I think it’s because he was playing an opening that he really wasn’t familiar with and probably underestimating AlphaGo. Even though he mostly recovered from that mistake, White 102 clearly took Lee Sedol by surprise. It’s a move I was expecting, because White had to do something like that, although of course you need the reading to back it up. It’s a move Lee Sedol should have been looking at and I think maybe one of the reasons he might not have been looking at it is that maybe he underestimated AlphaGo and wasn’t treating it like a top human player. In this game, I didn’t find anything I would call original in AlphaGo’s play, it was just plainly strong. Click here for Redmond and Garlock’s Match 1 15 min Summary.
2016.03.11_AlphaGo-Lee-Sedol-game-2-t-300x300

Game 2: AlphaGo’s Exquisite Game: In the second game, AlphaGo had black, and I was looking to see how it would play. In the games with Fan Hui, I wasn’t impressed with AlphaGo’s opening; it was really too orthodox, and too simple for a game with black, because of the big komi. Black needs to play more aggressively or more of a speed-oriented game. So I was interested to see how AlphaGo had changed since last October. So it was rewarding to see that AlphaGo was playing moves that were not conventional and they were speed-oriented and putting pressure on Lee Sedol from the start of the game. And then there was the shoulder-hit at move 37, which was a move that really took me by surprise and I’m pretty sure it took Lee Sedol by surprise too. One of the programmers dug into the files and found that the possibility of playing that move was something like one in ten thousand so it was a really unlikely move but it happened to be on the edge of AlphaGo’s search and in the analysis of the possible variations, AlphaGo decided to knock it up to the move that it would choose. I still don’t really understand the mechanics of it but it’s really interesting. Not only does AlphaGo have good shape or pattern-matching, but it can also think itself out of that and find something completely different, even though it might not have had a good score in the pattern analysis. That game on the whole was an exquisite game by AlphaGo. I actually thought that Lee Sedol had a pretty good chance to win up until the middle game and the game was sort of in the balance for a while there, but then almost before you notice it, AlphaGo had very subtly built up an advantage after Lee Sedol played a few slack moves. In this game, Lee Sedol took territory in the beginning, allowing AlphaGo to sort of dance around the board and take the initiative, and that’s not really typical of Lee Sedol, so once again he wasn’t really playing his own style. Click here for Redmond and Garlock’s Match 2 90-second Summary.

Game 3: Play Your Own Game
If I were Lee Sedol I’d just play an opening I’m familiar with and I wouldn’t worry about whether AlphaGo knows the moves or not and then he should continue into the middle game along a familiar path in which case he’ll be more at home and less likely to make mistakes. When Lee Sedol plays well he’s brilliant, of course. If he plays his own game I think he’s more likely to get into the middle game with a favorable position, which is really necessary. He hasn’t done that in these first two games; he’s been going into the middle game in a fairly difficult position. If Lee Sedol has a favorable position in the middle game, that’ll be something new for AlphaGo, something we haven’t seen yet. Just as a test of the program itself, that’s something I really want to see how it handles that.

The third game in the 5-game Lee Sedol-AlphaGo match will be Saturday, March 12, (Friday night 8p PST, 11p EST). The match will be livestreamed on DeepMind’s YouTube channel with commentary by Redmond and Garlock. And catch Cho Hyeyeon 9P’s commentary with Andrew Jackson starting at 9P PST on the AGA’s YouTube Channel. 

photos: (top right) Lee Sedol plays the first move in the first game; (middle left) Lee at the press conference after the second game

 

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