American Go E-Journal » Go Spotting

GO SPOTTING: Gaming Doctor ‘Caused Baby Death’; Bill Gates On His Failure At Go

Monday November 16, 2009

A five-month-old Chinese baby died in a hospital because his doctor was busy playing go online while his condition worsened, reports say. Officials from the Jiangsu provincial health department said that Dr Mao Xiaojun — admitted he was playing an online game of go — would be sacked from Nanjing Children’s Hospital, according to a November 13 report by the BBC. Parents have been angered by a series of major health blunders in China; more than 10,000 lawsuits relating to medical disputes have been filed in Chinese courts every year since 2002, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Gates On His Failure At Go: Billionaire Bill Gates (right) cites go as one of his personal failures. “When I was young . . . I wanted to be the world’s best chess player and, of course, I didn’t succeed. I wanted to be the world’s best Go player, too…so I’ve had plenty of disappointments,” Gates said in his 1997 book, Bill Gates Speaks: Insight from the World’s Greatest Entrepreneur. Click here to view the book online; the quote appears on page 227.
- Roy Laird & David Drexler

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

GO SPOTTING/GO PHOTO: Go During U.S. Internships in ‘42

Monday November 2, 2009

GO SPOTTING/GO PHOTO: A 1942 Life Magazine photo of Japanese American men playing go at the Heart Mountain Relocation Camp in Wyoming is among the Life go photos* found online by EJ reader Troy Anderson. Another one shows “Japanese go game being played at alien relocation camp,” while a third shows Japanese prisoners of war Kiichiro Hiranuma and Toshio Shiratori playing go and a fourth depicts prisoner of war Akira Muto playing go with rough pebbles on a paper board. Click here for background on the relocation and internment of approximately 110,000 Japanese nationals and Japanese Americans during World War 2. In 1988, Congress passed and President Ronald Reagan signed legislation apologizing for the internment on behalf of the U.S. government.
* the site where these photos were originally posted no longer exists; we’ve included new links for three of the four shots; if you locate the one of Akira Muto, please email us at journal@usgo.org

Categories: Go Photos,Go Spotting
Share

Go Spotting: Go Wargames

Monday December 22, 2008

In the 2008 film Wargames 2: The Dead Code, — the sequel to the 1983 science fiction film WarGames — “when Joshua is playing games with Ripley, and the games are rapidly flashing on the screen, games of go can be seen,” reports Doug Buchanan. Spotted go somewhere interesting? Email us at journal@usgo.org!

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

Go Spotting: Go Wargames

Monday December 22, 2008

In the 2008 film Wargames 2: The Dead Code, — the sequel to the 1983 science fiction film WarGames — “when Joshua is playing games with Ripley, and the games are rapidly flashing on the screen, games of go can be seen,” reports Doug Buchanan. Spotted go somewhere interesting? Email us at journal@usgo.org!

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

Go In The News: Go Makes Linux Mag

Monday December 15, 2008

“There is a picture taken by BGA member David Cantrell of a go game on the Swiss-Australian border in the December 2008 Linux Pro Magazine on page 92,” reports Bob Bacon. “The scene is described as an international go tournament that was part of the Linux Bier Wanderung. Looks like a great place to play go…. more than a mile higher than Black Mountain!” Click here for the article

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

Go In The News

Monday December 8, 2008

Mazda’s Fall ’08 Zoom Zoom magazine features go in an article entitled “Play Time” on page 10, reports Robert Cordingley of the Houston Go Club. “Play this,” the article says; “Legend has it that the board game of Go was born around 2300 BC. Today it is hugely popular in China and Japan.” The article is illustrated with “a modern version packaged in a rugged go-anywhere case” from Yellow Mountain Imports.

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

Strange Things Happen at the One-Two Point

Monday December 1, 2008

The Terminator played go on network television, this past Monday night. Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles featured “good” Terminatrix Summer Glau opening up a go board and playing out a position after telling Sarah Connor — and the show’s nationwide audience — that go is a “five thousand year old game, invented by the Chinese.” Earlier episodes of the series have focused on repeated attempts to stop various artificial intelligence programs from turning into Skynet, the military defense system that unleashes nuclear holocaust on humans in the Terminator movies. A previous program that played chess quite well was an initial target, but the Connors were able to stop it in time. A new program reared it’s head in the latest episode, but it doesn’t play chess, it plays go. Glau lays out a position on the board while telling Connor that “Strange things happen at the one two point. It’s a go proverb; it means the usual rules don’t apply.” The scene appears about 14 minutes into the episode, and can be watched on Fox’s website or on HulaTV.
-Paul Barchilon

Categories: Go Spotting
Share

GO SPOTTING: Mathematician Paul Erdos

Monday November 17, 2008

“Between long walks, loafing in the common room, and endless games of Go, it was hard to imagine when work got done,” wrote Bruce Schechter in “My Brain is Open: The Mathematical Journeys Of Paul Erdos” (Touchstone, 1998) The famed Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdos (right) (pronounced Air-dish) became a go player when he moved to the United States in the 1930′s; this passage describes Erdos’s arrival at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1938. “That Erdos and other mathematicians became addicted to Go at the Institute is easy to understand,” Schecter continues. “The ancient Asian game is deceptively simple, played by alternately placing black and white stones (at the Institute they used thumb tacks) at the intersections of a 19×19 rectangular grid. A game of Go, viewed from the right perspective, is really nothing more than a problem in graph theory. If, as G. H. Hardy wrote, ‘chess problems are the hymn-tunes of mathematics,’ a game of Go is a cantata.” Thanks to H. Vernon Leighton for passing this along. If you’ve seen an interesting reference to go, send it to us at journal@usgo.org

Categories: Go Spotting
Share