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This Week’s Go Calendar: Arlington and Raleigh

Monday September 15, 2014

September 20: Arlington, VA
NOVA Back to School Special
Gary Smith gary@novagoclub.org 703-254-6429

September 20: Raleigh, NC
Triangle Memorial Tournament
Bob Bacon bobbacon@earthlink.net 919-732-5184
Paul Celmer pcelmer@earthlink.net

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Updates: Turn-Based INGO Server Growing; Vancouver Go Group Meets Saturdays

Monday September 15, 2014

Turn-Based INGO Server Growing: The International Network Go Organization (INGO) now has about 606 registered members from 24 regions playing nearly 2,000 games. The turn-based server was established in May 2011 and expanded to the US in 2012 (New Turn-Based Go Server Comes to U.S. 9/17/2012 EJ). Links to INGO and other TBG servers – as well as real-time servers – can be found on the AGA’s Internet Go page.

Vancouver Go Group Meets Saturdays: Austin Freeman has started up a small go group in Vancouver, Washington to teach people interested in learning go. The group meets Saturdays at the Cascade Park Library (next to Firstenburg Center) on Mill Plain and 136th/137th in Vancouver from 4-6pm (though Freeman’s often there as early as 1 or 2p). Reach Freeman at austinjfreeman@live.com.

Phil Straus Wins OGS SDK Tourney

Sunday September 14, 2014

Phil Straus won the Online-Go.com SDK Round Robin tournament that ran February 3 through September 1. Straus, 3k on OGS, swept the 8-2014.09.14_ogslogo-lightplayer field with seven wins and 21 points. Mpopovic 12k was second with 5 wins and 14 points. OGS allows both turn-based and real time play; this was a turn-based tournament. In turn-based play, players make a move, opponents are notified via email and have a set time in which they must respond. This tournament had time limits of about  one day per move. Click here for info on other OGS tournaments.

“Invincible” Re-Issued & Cool Go Stamps

Sunday September 14, 2014

In cooperation with Kiseido, GoShopkeima.com has just issued the fourth printing of John Power’s classic “Invincible: The Games of Shusaku.”2014.09.13_netherland-go-stamps “We still believe that all serious go players eventually want to have this book as a real book,” says GoShopkeima.com’s Peter Zandveld. There’s lots more cool go stuff at the site, including go stamps he designed. Though they can only be used for mail sent within The Netherlands, we’re pretty sure go players can come with other creative uses for them. Zandfeld developed the site with Marianne Diederen and Kim Ouweleen. 

 

Your Move/Readers Write: High/Low Brow Matrix Offensive

Sunday September 14, 2014

“I am probably in a very small minority on this topic, but I found the ‘High Brow – Low Brow’ matrix (Go Spotting: A “Highbrow” Game in 2014.09.14_NYT-highbrow-cropped1949  9/6/2014 EJ) extremely offensive,” writes Gordon Castanza. “As with almost all pseudo sociology that passes as junk science, this crap is another example. Go, if anything is classless, colorblind, and non-age-specific. Besides, the entire matrix applies to any number of people at any given time. Glenmorangie Taghta can be enjoyed by anyone (of legal drinking age); it also knows no class, income level, working condition, color of one’s skin, or country of origin. I know you’re trying to show go in the most positive light possible, and I’ve enjoyed the ‘Go Spotting’ feature in the past. However, to have some C-grade sociologist put go, or any other human endeavor, into a hierarchical range is just plain stupid and intellectually dishonest.”

Your Move/Readers Write: Where to Play Go in Japan

Saturday September 13, 2014

A number of readers responded to Ben Bernstein’s request for information on where to play go in Japan (Looking for Japan Go Tips 9/4 EJ). Be sure to check ahead whenever possible, as clubs often move or close (email journal@usgo.org with updated info). Here’s a run-down:

Click here for Sensei’s Library’s listings of “Places to visit when in Japan, related to Go. Shopping, bookstores, clubs, restaurants, historical 2014.09.13_nihonkiin2places, events, cemeteries, shrines, transport etc. Thanks to Bob McGuigan for the tip.

Nihon Ki-in; email for a tour. “Also ask about the English go class they have,” suggests Devin Flake. “I was able to meet professional players and have them review my games, all so they could practice their English!” photo: the Nihon Ki-in’s top playing room 

7-2 Gobancho Chiyoda-Ku Tokyo Japan – at Ichigaya station — 1st Go Salon inside of Nihon Ki-in

1-7-20 -9F, Yaesu Chuo-Ku Tokyo Japan – at Tokyo station — 2nd Go Salon of Nihon Ki-in

Sunshine City Go Salon 8th or 9th floor

Ueno Go Center; literally a stone’s throw from Ueno Station; the address is Tokyo-to, Taito-ku, Ueno Koen 1-54; phone 03-3831-3137. Look for the big Shouchiku Department Store sign; you’ll be able to see go players in the third-floor windows of the club.

Diamond Go Salon; “This one was a little expensive and its mainly for women but it was still fun to try out!” says Devin Flake.
4 floor building Kojimachi Scripture 3-4-7, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 〒 03-3263-0620 TEL/Fax directly. Exit 3 “Kojimachi station” ○ 2014.09.13_kaz-roger-sunshineTokyo Metro Yurakucho Line, Hanzomon “○ Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line “5-minute walk from the train station 7 minutes walk from the “Yotsuya Station ○ JR, Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line, Nanboku”

Email E-Journal contributor Kazunari Furuyama cickazu@gmail.com “He was very good to me and introduced me to the Sunshine City Go Salon,” says Flake. “He even reviewed my games and took me out for lunch and dinner – great guy!” photo: Kaz (left) with the Bay Area Go Players Association’s Roger Schrag at the Sunshine Club; photo by Lisa Schrag

“Many train stations have go clubs nearby,” says Lee Freedman. “Look for the kanji for IGo.” He adds that “Westerners frequent a go club near the Takadananobaba train station in Tokyo.” He also reports that “There is a go club in Shinjuku open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.” That’s confirmed by Bob Barber, who just returned from Tokyo. “It’s across the street from the Shinjuku Prince Hotel (in Shinjuku, of course). On the 4th (or 6th) floor. In any case, you can see the kanji for Go from street level. The Japanese have a word for it: shibui. Well-worn tables, perhaps a dozen. Probably not smoke free.”

Freedman says that senior centers often have go clubs. “Expect to pay a fee at clubs, to be asked your playing rank, and to be flooded with requests for games, especially if your rating is shodan or higher. If you want to be fair, inflate your US rating one stone.”