American Go E-Journal » U.S. Go Congress

U.S. Go Congress Coming to the Big Apple

Friday February 28, 2014

“The U.S. Go Congress has never before been in a place so close to so much!” says Congress organizer Matthew Hershberger. As previously reported (’14 US Go Congress To Be Held In Midtown Manhattan, Sources Say 12/4/2013 EJ), the Congress will be held August 9-17 in midtown Manhattan, “just a stone’s throw from landmarks like the Empire State Building and Madison Square Garden,” Hershberger tells the E-Journal. “You will be playing on the 18th floor of the world famous Hotel Pennsylvania just across the street from Penn Station. Times Square, Bryant Park, Grand Central Station, and Korea Town are all just minutes away on foot, and the subways will easily get you anywhere in the city.” The hotel, which has been hosting visitors since 1919 boasts that “more guests have stayed with us than in any other hotel in the world.”

The Congress website is now live and though registration is not yet open, “you can check out the prices and start planning your trip now.”

The largest go activity in the United States, the annual U.S. Go Congress features 8 days of go, including tournaments, professional lectures and game analysis, continuous self paired games, and all kinds of go-related activities from morning to midnight.

And while New York is an expensive city, “we’ve worked hard to keep the Congress affordable,” says Hershberger. That means there are a few differences from previous years. This year there is no meal plan provided; instead, players will be free to explore the many local restaurants of all kinds and at all prices. Locals say you can eat reasonably easily for less than $30/day, or, if you’re so inclined, splurge at some of the best restaurants in the world.

Since the Congress is in a hotel this year, there are no dorm rooms available. “We’ve negotiated extra low prices for guests staying in the hotel,” says Hershberger. A typical room with two beds will run around $1,100 per person (including Congress registration), and there are lower-cost options for the more budget-conscious. You are allowed to have extra people in a room, so groups who are willing to share a room with more people than beds can cut costs significantly.

“Come for the go, come for the camaraderie of old friends, come for thrill of the big city!” urges Hershberger. “Whatever your reasons, we are looking forward to seeing you in New York this August!”

 

 

Share

Cuban Delegation Invited to US Go Congress

Monday January 20, 2014

A delegation of Cuban go players has been invited to attend this year’s U.S. Go Congress for the first time and AGA board member Robert Gilman is coordinating fundraising efforts to support the visit. “The Cubans have greeted our invitation with ‘immense joy’,” Gilman — who organized the 2013 visit by US players to Cuba (Traveling Board: U.S.-Cuba Friendship Match “A Rare Opportunity”) — reports, “but the key question is money. Cuba is a poor country, the Cuban internal currency is worthless in the U.S. and the AGA does not have the budget to sponsor the delegation, so we’re asking the go community to step up. Cubans have made strong efforts to develop go there, but isolation from the international go community and limited internet have handicapped them. This visit will help them develop and extend bonds with our neighbors to the South.” The invitees are  Cuba’s top two players and the president of the Academia Cubana de Go. The video here describes this effort.

Contributions can be made through either the AGA or the American Go Foundation (AGF); contributions to the AGF are tax deductible. In either case, put “CC2014” in the memo field, and mail the check to Gilman at  P.O. Box 40020 in Albuquerque, NM 87196-0020. Checks will be acknowledged as they are received but not cashed until its clear the project is a go. If you are contributing, please complete the form here.

’14 US Go Congress To Be Held In Midtown Manhattan, Sources Say

Wednesday December 4, 2013

According to informed sources, plans are under way to hold the 2014 U.S. Go Congress at the Hotel Pennsylvania in midtown Manhattan from August 9-16. “It’s a terrific location with easy access all that New York City has to offer,” the highly-placed source said. The Pennsylvania has previously hosted the East Coast Oza qualifiers. More details on the 2014 US Go Congress are expected to be announced soon.

Popular Teacher’s Workshop to Return at 2014 Go Congress

Tuesday August 27, 2013

The Teacher’s Workshop will be offered again at the 2014 Go Congress, according to AGA VP Chris Kirschner.  “The howling success of the 2013 Workshop indicates that this will become a regular Go Congress event,” he told the E-Journal.  The Workshop had 21 hours of programming, with some of the sessions repeated.   Certificates for 8 hours of participation were earned by 40 teachers who ranged from 15 kyu to 5 dan.  Go teachers who did not attend the workshop are welcome to join the announcement/discussion list for the Workshop, which is being moderated by Bill Camp.  To join the list, just email BillPhotos: top right: Go Phrase Guessing Game devised by Korean Pro Dahee Lee (at back); bottom left: Chris Kirschner; bottom right: Bill Camp.  Photos/report by Brian Allen

U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Thursday (8/7), Friday (8/8) & Saturday (8/9)

Sunday August 25, 2013

The previously-published Congress Photo Scrapbooks (below) have now been updated with full-size slideshows of EJ photographer Phil Straus’ albums for each day. We’ve also published three all-new albums of Straus’ photos. Enjoy!
- The Editors


U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Saturday, August 3  
Click here to see the new daily slideshow.
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Sunday, August 4 
Click here to see the new daily slideshow.
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Monday, August 5 
Click here to see the new daily slideshow. 
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Tuesday, August 6 
Click here to see the new daily slideshow.
NEW! Thursday, August 7:
Click here for Phil Straus’ complete album of the day.
NEW! Friday, August 8: Click here for Phil Straus’ complete album of the day.
NEW! Saturday, August 9: Click here for Phil Straus’ complete album of the day.

 

Categories: U.S. Go Congress
Share

2013 U.S. Go Congress at a Glance: Report/Game Index

Saturday August 24, 2013

From before the Opening Ceremonies to the closing Awards Banquet, the American Go E-Journal once again provided comprehensive coverage of the annual U.S. Go Congress, this year held August 3-11 in Tacoma, WA. In addition to broadcasting and posting dozens of top games, many with commentary by professional go players, the EJ published daily tournament recaps and previews (a new feature this year), interviews, features and scrapbooks of photos from the biggest event on the US go calendar. Here’s a selection of our coverage, organized into a handy overview. All the coverage is available online: click on U.S. Go Congress under Categories or search for specific keywords. Game records are posted on the US Open, NAMT  and Strong Players Open; also see below for clickable links to the professional game commentaries. 

Tournament Reports
U.S. Go Congress Recap: Yuhan Zhang Wins U.S. Open
2013 North American Masters Tournament: Final Results (includes player photos)
2013 Strong Players Open: Final Results (includes player photos)
Los Angeles Tops Inaugural Pandanet-AGA City League
Amy Wang and Justin Ching Win Pair Go Tourney
Andrew Lu Repeats As Die Hard Winner

Daily Recaps/Previews

U.S. Go Congress Preview: Sunday, August 4
U.S. Go Congress Recap/Preview: Monday, August 5
U.S. Go Congress Recap/Preview: Tuesday, August 6
U.S. Go Congress Recap/Preview: Wednesday, August 7
U.S. Go Congress Recap/Preview: Friday, August 9
U.S. Go Congress Recap/Preview: Matthew Hu Repeats as NAMT Champ; Cong Li Wins SPO

Congress Photo Scrapbooks
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Saturday, August 3 
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Sunday, August 4 
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Monday, August 5 
U.S. Go Congress Scrapbook: Tuesday, August 6

Other Reports
Everyone’s A Winner at NAMT Board Auction
Dolen & Fukuda Receive Lasker Awards
Go History Lessons on Display at Congress
Takemiya on Teaching
Korean Leaders visit Seattle Go Center
Auto Exec Turns His Sights on Popularizing Go
Go Quiz: Something In Common

Youth Reports
Defending Champs Hold Onto Redmond Cup Titles
Ching, Huang, and Xu Top Youth Team Tourney
Kurebayashi’s Top Youth-Adult Pair Go
Frisbee Go – Youth Room Style
Gan and Ye Score in Redmond Cup; Lightning Tourney in Youth Room

Game Commentaries: The E-Journal team broadcast 15 professional commentaries during the 2013 U.S. Go Congress. In addition to the U.S. Open, the North American Masters and the Strong Players Open, we also covered the Pandanet-AGA City League A-League final as well as the Samsung Qualifier taking place in Korea.

U.S. Open Round 1, Board 1: Jennie Shen 2P on Zi Yang (Matthew) Hu vs. Tianyu (Bill) Lin
U.S. Open Round 2, Board 1: Cathy Li 1P on Zi Yang Hu vs. Jianing Gan
U.S. Open Round 3, Board 1: Shirley Lin 1P on Zi Yang Hu vs. Yuhan Zhang 7d
U.S. Open Round 3, Board 1: Chujo Chihiro 3P on Zi Yang Hu 1p vs. Yuhan Zhang 7d
U.S. Open Round 3, Board 2: Myungwan Kim 9P on Calvin Sun 7d vs. Peilun Li 7d
U.S. Open Round 4 Board 1: Wei Chen 3P on Yuhan Zhang 7d vs. Calvin Sun 7d
U.S. Open Round 5 Board 1: Mingjiu Jiang 9P on Yuhan Zhang 7d vs. Peilun Li 7d
NAMT Round 1 Board 1: Yang Yi 6P on Matthew Hu 1p vs Jianing Gan 7d
NAMT Round 2, Board 1:  Yilun Yang 7P on Calvin Sun 7d vs. Zi Yang Hu 1P
NAMT Round 4 Board 1: Takemiya Masaki on Stephanie Yin 1p vs. Zi Yang Hu 1P
NAMT Round 4 Board 2: Mingming Yin 1p on Hugh Zhang 7d vs Andy Liu 1P
SPO Round 2 Board 2: BeomGeun (Evan) Cho 7d vs Yuhan Zhang 7d (player commentary)
SPO Round 4 Board 1:  Myungwan Kim on Cong Li 3P vs Yuhan Zhang 7D
SPO Round 4 Board 2:  Huiren Yang 1p on Peilun Li 7d vs Evan Cho 7d
Pandanet-AGA City League A-League final: Myungwan Kim 9P on Beumgeon (Evan) Cho and Jie Li
Samsung Qualifier: Mingjiu Jiang 7P on Eric Lui 7d vs Ben Lockhart

2013 US GO CONGRESS EJ TEAM
Managing Editor: Chris Garlock; Assistant Manager: Todd Heidenreich; Broadcast coordinator: Steve Colburn and Dennis Wheeler; Photography: Phil Straus; KGS admin: Akane Negishi, with Sadaharu Wakisaka; Youth Editor: Paul Barchilon; Myron Souris (off-site support). Simulcast Manager: Solomon Smilack; US Open Game Recorders: Dennis Wheeler, Richard Dolen, Mike Lepore, Frank Lam. NAMT Game Recorders: Dennis Wheeler, Richard Dolen, Andrew Jackson, Solomon Smilack, David Weimer, Logan Lancaster, Brian Leahy, Ethan Frank, Matt Payton, Alex Salazar, Mike Lepore. Professionals: Cathy Li, Myunyan Kim, Yilun Yang, Shirley Lin, Huiren Yang, Mingjiu Jiang, Takemiya Masaki & Pro Coordinator I-Han Lui. photo by Phil Straus

Takemiya Masaki 9P & Chihiro Chujo 1P Teach at Seattle Go Center

Friday August 23, 2013

During the week following the U.S. Go Congress, Takemiya Masaki  9p from the Nihon Ki-in and Chihiro Chujo 1p from the Kansai Ki-in each taught three times at the Seattle Go Center.  Ms. Chujo was an enthusiastic go teacher, and an eager student of the English language.  Her English vocabulary increased notably during her week-long visit. In his first lecture, Takemiya gave commentary on two of his games; one from the beginning of his career in 1969 and one with his friend and competitor Cho Chikun from 1988.  Takemiya’s second lecture was for kyu players, and stressed that “those who play where they want lose more games but get stronger faster”.  He admitted that sometimes there is only one move on the board, and showed an example of this situation, but he reassured the audience of 22 players that usually there are options to try out.  Both Chujo and Takemiya played simultaneous games on Tuesday, Aug. 14,  the busiest day of the week at the Go Center.  Two of Takemiya’s games with strong players were recorded and broadcast on KGS, and then shown in the kitchen with a digital projector.  At one point there was a roar from the kitchen when the internet connection was temporarily lost, puzzling the players in the main room who did not know what had happened.  The games are posted in the news section of the Go Center website, along with the two games Mr. Takemiya presented in his lecture.

There was also time for sight-seeing, and for good seafood dinners.  Miss Chujo went for a canoe ride, while Mr. Takemiya had a fine round of golf, with three birdies, and also went tango dancing after one of his lectures.  Top photo: Takemiya Masaki; bottom: Chihiro Chujo. Report/photos by Brian Allen

Everyone’s A Winner at NAMT Board Auction

Thursday August 22, 2013

The Hu family won twice on the night of the North American Masters Tournament final when Alex Hu, father of 2013 NAMT winner Zi Yang (Matthew) Hu was the winning bidder at the NAMT board auction at the U.S. Go Congress awards banquet. The senior Hu had narrowly lost out last two years ago when  Rachel Small and Eileen Hlavka outbid him for the board on which Matthew Hu defeated Curtis Tang, and clearly came prepared this year, outlasting a hot bidding war for the 2-inch kaya board (confirmed by 2013 Lasker winner Richard Dolen’s nose) donated by Katherine and Sidney Yuan of Yutopian, with the proceeds going to the American Go Foundation. With American Go E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock serving as fast-talking auctioneer — ably assisted by AGF President Terry Benson and AGA President Andy Okun — more than half a dozen bidders vied for the board, which had been signed by both players – Matthew Hu and Mingming (Stephanie) Yin – as well as by professionals Takemiya Masaki 9P and Myung-wan Kim 9P, who had provided live commentary on the game for hundreds of U.S. Go Congress attendees, as well as hundreds more watching on KGS. A last-minute surge pushed the bidding over  $1,000 but in the end Alex Hu’s all-time record $1,300 winning bid guaranteed that he and his son would be taking the historic board home while supporting the American Go Foundation’s many projects to help youth go.”The AGF and the AGA have been very good for my son and I want to give something back,” said an elated Hu.
- photo (l-r): Garlock, Kim, Takemiya, Alex Hu, Okun, Yin, Benson and Zi Yang Hu; photo by Phil Straus

 

Categories: U.S. Go Congress
Share

Dolen & Fukuda Receive Lasker Awards

Saturday August 17, 2013

In a surprise announcement, not one but two Lasker Awards were made at this year’s U.S. Go Congress. The recipients were two longtime go organizers, Richard Dolen (middle in photo at right) and Frank Fukuda (right in photo below). As Dolen himself modestly noted, his greatest claim to fame in 60 years in the go community is having taken Michael Redmond to Japan as a young boy, where he was accepted as a pupil by Oeda Yusuke 8P and eventually became the first US-born 9-dan professional go player. Fukuda’s long go history in Seattle includes being part of the Last Exit Go Club’s team that organized the second U.S. Go Congress in Seattle in 1985. Dolen, whose go career has taken him around the world, has played a key role in the Los Angeles go scene for many years, and the Cotsen Open – one of the major events on the U.S. go calendar – is the result of Dolen introducing Eric Cotsen to Yilun Yang 7P. Fukuda was a key player in the creation of the Seattle Go Center, as well as helping ensure its survival and growth. Click here for Dolen’s “Snapshots from 60 Years of Go” and “Chris Kirscher on Frank Fukuda.” The Lasker Award is named after Edward Lasker, a founder of the American Go Association. photos: top right: Dolen (center) with AGA President Andy Okun (left) and E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock; bottom left: Fukuda (right) with 2013 Congress Director Chris Kirschner; photos by Phil Straus

Defending Champs Hold Onto Redmond Cup Titles

Wednesday August 14, 2013

Defending champions Jianing Gan 7d and Aaron Ye 6d both held on to their Redmond Cup titles in the exciting final rounds of the tournament at the US Go Congress last week.  Ye won round one (see the E-J from 8-4) and was determined not to lose his title to the challenger David Lu 6d, of Canada. The Redmond finals are a best two out of three match, so the second game is crucial.  Ironically, Lu drew Ye as his opponent in the US Open on Tuesday morning, Aug. 6, and defeated him.  Going into the afternoon match, the question on everyone’s mind was could Lu do it twice in a row on the same day?  The boys played a spirited game, even commenting on each other’s moves before finishing, but Ye showed his full strength and held onto his title.  Ye has now won the Redmond Cup three times – putting him in line to be Redmond Meijin if he can win twice more before turning 18.  In the 20 year history of the Redmond, Eric Lui 7d and Curtis Tang 7d are the only two players to have successfully crossed that line.

In the Senior Division (ages 12-17) Jianing Gan won round one against Andrew Lu 6d.  Lu played a spirited game in round two, determined not to lose two in a row.  Playing white, he successfully parried Gan’s Low Chinese opening, reducing or invading at every possible juncture, but found himself with a running line of eyeless stones as a result.  The tide turned when he was able to save this group, making the game very close.  Gan fought back skillfully, but Lu prevailed to win by 2.5 points.  Round three was played on Thursday, and Gan again opened with the Low Chinese.  Lu managed to invade on both sides, completely undermining Gan’s original Low Chinese side, but giving Gan massive thickness on the outside as a result.  Changing directions, Gan then attacked Lu vigorously on the other side of the board.  Lu, behind on time and in byo yomi for most of the game, was forced to resign when he couldn’t find a solution to save his group.  Having won the final match, Gan held onto his Redmond title for the second year and will be a force to be reckoned with next year as well.  The Redmond Cup has been run by Michael Bull for the past 20 years, with online qualifiers, and a final at congress.  All of the final games were broadcast live on KGS, and drew hundreds of spectators.  Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo by Paul Barchilon: David Lu 6d (l) vs. Aaron Ye 6d (r),  Justin Teng 6d is recording the game in the background. 

[link]