American Go E-Journal » U.S./North America

Three School Chess and Go Tourney

Monday February 13, 2017

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Twenty-four children played in Portland’s latest chess and go tournament for kids, held on Jan. 22nd. Six kids played go and 18 played chess. Perennial champ Olin Waxler, 4-0 took first place in go, with Luke Helprin taking second over Emmett Perkins on tie-breaker points, both at 3-1. Top-seeded Brady Yamin took first place in chess, with Ai Rose Solomon beating Ty Holt for 2nd on tie-breaking points. Prizes were gift certificates to Guardian Games, 1st place, $25, 2nd place $15, and 3rd place, $10. - Story and Photo by Peter Freedman

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South Central Go Tournament update

Sunday February 12, 2017

As the South Central Go Tournament draws near (February 18-19, Plano, TX – Dallas area) things look promising for a 2017.02.12_texas-tourney-reportgood event, reports Bob Gilman. “As of February 6, there are 31 players registered — 6 Open Section, ranging from 7d to 3d, and 25 Handicap Section, ranging from 1k to 21k,” says Gilman. Players from eight states have registered: AR (4), CA (1), CO (1), KY (2), MO (1), NM (3), UT (1), and TX (18). “Additionally, there are 22 players who have said they will probably attend or would like to attend but are not sure.” There will be three rounds played each day. On-line registration remains open through February 15. It will also be possible to register at the door.

This is an AGA rated tournament which means players will need to be current AGA members to compete. If you decide to come, you can check your AGA membership status, find out about the different types of membership, and join or renew on-line here.

There is more information about the tournament and a registration link on Facebook.

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Stephen Hu wins 25th annual Jujo Jiang Goe tournament

Tuesday February 7, 2017

Stephen Hu topped the 25th annual Jujo Jiang Goe Tournament last weekend. Sponsored by Ing’s Go Foundation of 2017.02.07_jujo-tourney-collageCalifornia, the tournament was held on February 4 and 5th at the Kabuki Hotel in San Francisco. Donna Casey presented Jujo Jiang with a Certificate of Honor from Mayor Ed Lee of San Francisco for 25 years of service to American go players.

Stephen Hu won the open section with a perfect score of five wins. $3000 in prizes were handed out across five divisions: Open, Dan, Expert, Intermediate and Novice. Non-cash prizes were also given to each player who played all five rounds without a victory.

Results by section:
Open: 1st: Stephen Hu; 2nd: Yuefeng Zhang; 3rd: Ary Cheng; 4th: Yufei Hu
Dan: 1st: Linden Chiu; 2nd: James Chiu; 3rd: Steven Burrall; 4th: Jason Won
Expert: 1st: Hojin Lee; 2nd: Jay Chan; 3rd: Nan Zhong; 4th: K Kim
Intermediate: 1st: Chao Zhang; 2nd: Tai-An Cha; 3rd: Elwin Li; 4th: Yunyen Jin
Novice: 1st: David Baran; 2nd: Dahlin Casey; 3rd: Nathan Bouscal; 4th: Bruce Bailey

photos (clockwise, from top left): Various attendees with Jujo and MingJiu; tournament playing area; Elwyn Berlekamp, Karoline Burrall, Steve Burrall; Jujo, Donna Casey, C.O. Armistad; Open Winner Stephen Hu; photos by Ernest Brown 

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Instant replay saves the day in Evanston

Tuesday February 7, 2017

The Evanston Go Club hosted its Winter Wonderland tournament on Saturday, Feb 4. Turnout was excellent, with 34 players2017.02.07_evanston-counting attending, ranging in rank from 5d to 20k

“Special thanks go to Xinming Simon Guo for catching a counting error that changed the result of a game,” said TD Mark Rubenstein. Guo, the 2015 AGF Teacher of the Year and founder of the Go And Math Academy in Chicago, was video-ing the counting stage of the games. He planned to use the videos in his classes to demonstrate math concepts in the game of go.

One of the games ended with black winning by half a point. However, after the result had been entered by the TD, Guo was reviewing the 2017.02.07_evanston-playing-areavideo and noticed that there were seven black stones lined up on a row that was only six points long. “One of those stones didn’t belong there, it should have been put inside black’s territory. This is the first time I have ever seen a game result overturned based on an instant replay!” said Rubenstein.

Winners were: Na (Nicole) Pan 5d: 3-1, Daniel Puzan 2d: 5-0, William Torres Amesty 3k: 4-0, Scott Gerson 8k: 4-0, Crystal Lin 14k: 4-0, and a prize for most games played to David Rohde with 8 games. “Thanks to Yellow Mountain for providing awesome prizes!” says Rubenstein.

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The Power Report (2 of 3): Xie starts well in Women’s Kisei, Nyu catches up; Cho U wins 900th game

Sunday February 5, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal2017.02.05_Xie wins #1 Womens Kisei

Xie starts well in Women’s Kisei, Nyu catches up: The first game of the 20th Docomo Cup Women’s Kisei title match, a best-of-three, was played at the Hotel Sunrise Garden in Hiratsuka City, Kanagawa Prefecture on January 19. This year the 2017.02.05_Nyu (L) loses first gamechallenger is the 17-year-old Nyu Eiko (left). A disciple of Michael Redmond, who is her mother’s brother-in-law, she became a professional at the Nagoya branch of the Nihon Ki-in last year. Nyu quickly showed promise and has already represented Japan several times in team tournaments. In the opening game of the title match, Xie Yimin (White, at right), the defending champion, showed the benefit of greater experience and forced a resignation after 154 moves. However, Nyu fought back in the second game, played in the Ryusei Studio in the basement of the Nihon Ki-in in Tokyo on January 30. Taking white, Nyu forced a resignation after 186 moves. The fate of the title will be decided on February 6.2017.01.05_Cho U

Cho U wins 900th game: Cho U (right) has become the 25th Nihon Ki-in player to reach the benchmark of 900 wins. In a game in Preliminary C of the 43rd Gosei tournament, played on January 19, Cho (black) beat Kim En 4P by resig. This took his record to 900 wins, 388 losses, 2 jigo, and 1 no-result. At 36 years 11 month, Cho is the youngest player to win 900 games (putting Yamashita Keigo, at 37 years two months, into 2nd place); at 22 years nine months, he is the 2nd fastest (top is Yamashita at 22 years seven months); his winning percentage of 69.9 is the 2nd highest (top is Takao with 70%).

Tomorrow: Yo to challenge for Judan;  Honinbo League; Meijin League

 

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New Jersey Open canceled

Saturday February 4, 2017

This year’s New Jersey Open has been canceled, and will be discontinued indefinitely. One of the longest-running go 2017.02.04_2016NJO-IMG_6304tournaments in the U.S., the NJO — usually held in mid-February — had seen increased turnout in recent years, but ran into organizational problems this year. Princeton University, the longtime site of the tournament, “will not approve the event now unless it is entirely run by students,” says Tournament Director Rick Mott, “and we don’t have enough active students available to pull that off this year.” Another issue was Princeton’s ban on cash prizes. “We’re looking for other regional tournament activities to fill the gap,” says Co-Director Paul Matthews. Meanwhile, East Coast go players can mark their calendars for the nearby Philadelphia Spring Open tournament on March 12.


At the 2016 NJO; photo by Chris Garlock

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AGA live commentary on LG Cup finals starts Sunday night

Saturday February 4, 2017

The AGA broadcast team is back at it, starting this weekend with the LG Cup Finals. On Sunday, the AGA’s own Gansheng Shi 1P will provide live commentary on our YouTube channel of the first game of the finals between Zhou Ruiyang 9p vs Dang Yifei 6p, starting at 7PM PST (10P EST).

Then, Tuesday the 7th and Wednesday the 8th, join Stephanie Yin 1P as she comments the next two games in the series.
YouTube commentary on all three broadcasts will begin at 7PM PST (10P EST), about halfway through these long games (main time is 3 hours per player).

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In Memoriam: Evanston Go Club’s Ian Feldman

Wednesday February 1, 2017

Evanston Go Club member Ian Feldman passed away on Sunday, January 22 of an apparent heart attack. He was 74 years 2017.02.01_ian-feldmanold. Ian was, in long-time friend John Harriman’s words, “The most regular of regulars” at John’s go club and at the No Exit cafe go club when it was in existence. He attended the two current clubs for about 20 years, and was well-known for his intelligence, humor, and insight. Many beginners have benefited from his willingness to teach. Ian also attended numerous U.S. Go Congresses, where he placed as a 1 kyu one year.

“I’ll never forget a conversation we had at the 2002 Chicago Congress”, said EGC president Mark Rubenstein. “I was listening to music on headphones while playing one of my U.S. Open games. I missed an obvious move and lost a group, resulting in my resignation. After the game, Ian asked me why I was wearing headphones, and I told him it helped me relax. “You shouldn’t be relaxed while playing Go!”, he chided me. “You need to be on edge, so you can feel the threat of your opponent’s every move!” He was right, and his comment has stuck with me all these years.”

Ian’s family has donated his collection of go books to the Evanston Go Club. The books will become the Ian Feldman Lending Library, and will be available for club members to borrow any time.

photo courtesy Mark Rubenstein

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NJ Open Survey (updated)

Wednesday February 1, 2017

This year, Rutgers University Go Club is hosting one of the largest tournaments on the East Coast. The New Jersey Open will be held on a Saturday in March (exact date to be decided) in the Campus Center. AGA membership is not required. Must be 18+ to participate. Preregistration will begin in February, but if you’re interested in coming, please fill out the interest form linked here - your responses will let us know how much space we need to book.
(2/1/2017): We’ve just received word that the club has made the decision that holding the tournament this year is beyond their reach, and are cancelling their plans. Stay tuned for updates. 

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Northwestern University Exploring Go and Math

Tuesday January 31, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-01-31 at 4.56.26 PMNorthwestern University in Illinois offered a new course on go last semester. The course was designed to help students build number sense, understand math concepts, and practice mathematical thinking, and was offered through the Center for Talent Development. The course evolved from a joint research project set up in November, 2015, by Xinming Guo, founder of Go and Math Academy, and David Uttal, a professor of Psychology and Education at Northwestern University. Guo has been advocating go for years, integrating the game as a math manipulative in the classroom. Each year thousands of students in Chicago and its suburbs have opportunities to make their first contact with go. After a demonstration of go and its connections to math education, Professor Uttal suggested Guo develop a course on go and math for the CTD program at Northwestern University. The new course was offered to students for the first time this past fall.

Professor Uttal leads a research laboratory of undergraduate, graduate students, and post-docs investigating spatial cognition and STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Math) education. With the help of Professor Uttal and his lab, the research now focuses not only on go and elementary math education, but also on go and spatial thinking. The project team is comprised of Professor Uttal, his doctoral student Yanning Yu, and Guo. “Once we have more research results, we are hopeful that a link can be established between go and fundamental cognitive skills of human beings,” says Guo.

“The course and research have generated rich data so far. Doctoral student Yu and another research assistant, who recorded the entire 8-week course, have made many surprising discoveries after just a preliminary analysis,” says Guo. Deeper analysis is continuing and will provide more supporting materials for the 2nd phase of the research. “Go is a gold mine for future researches, no, a diamond mine,” said Professor Uttal.

Guo shared his vision of bringing go to every school in his keynote speech at the US Go Congress in 2015. He continues to develop elementary go and math curricula to help students build solid math foundations, and also runs professional development seminars for teachers. “I hope that our research on the relationship between go and math can also make contributions to the history of go in the whole world,” said Guo. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Xinming Guo: Professor Uttal (l) and Xinming Guo (r) with the Northwestern CTD Catalog, fall 2016, which lists their go course under the math category.

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