American Go E-Journal » World

Children’s Art Contest Deadline July 13

Monday June 11, 2012

The second International Children’s Go Art Contest is still accepting submissions.  Organizer Siddhartha Avila urges kids to send their paintings as soon as possible. “Last year, almost all the entries arrived on the last days, making organization harder…we have received entries from Singapore, Argentina, Japan, and Mexico so far,” reports Avila.  The pieces will be exhibited at the U.S. Go Congress in North Carolina this summer.  The event is sponsored by the Mexican Youth Go Community and the AGA, in honor of the International Go Symposium.  Organizer Siddhartha Avila says “the contest will feature children’s artwork, in which they will be free to express their visions, emotions and ideas about go through painting. Its purpose is to make go culture flourish among children, and promote it through a creative exchange.”  Last year’s contest drew submissions from Japan, the Phillipines, India, the US and Mexico.  Submissions must be received in Mexico City by July 13th.  Complete information, including the submission forms and event details, can be found on the Go Symposium site. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

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4th Trans-Atlantic Youth Match This Sunday

Wednesday May 30, 2012

The strongest north American kids will face off against their counterparts in Europe, this Sunday, June 3, on KGS.  Canada and the US will play as a team, top players Calvin Sun, 7d, from the US and Bill Lin, 7d,  from Canada will lead the fight taking on Pavel Lisy 5d and Lukas Podpera 5d.  Each side will field ten players.  Europe won last year, but North America won the two years prior.  Spectators are welcome and can watch the action in the TransAtlantic Youth Go Tournament room.  Due to the wide time ranges, the matches will take place at two different times.  Group 1 will be at 11 am EDT, and group 2 at 2 pm EDT.  The schedule and the players are all listed on the webpage for the event. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

2010′s Top 20 Professional Go Players

Saturday May 12, 2012

For those of you who like to follow the professional go scene, An Younggil 8P (r) recently finished writing a year-long series of articles for GoGameGuru profiling the top 20 professional go players of 2010. Throughout the series, Younggil goes well beyond the usual historical details to write about players’ personalities and go styles, as well as recounting his own meetings with many of them. Younggil’s intention was to introduce his professional colleagues to a Western audience as humans, rather than just pro go players. He also shares many insights into the life of a professional go player and the go scene in Korea. It makes fascinating reading for any serious go fan.
The full list of bios includes: Lee SedolKong JiePark JunghwanChoi CheolhanKang DongyunHeo YounghoGu LiXie HeWon SeongjinLi ZheZhou RuiyangTuo JiaxiLee ChanghoQiu JunKim JiseokWang XiCho HanseungChen YaoyePark Younghun and Lee Younggu.

photo: Kong Jie (left) and Lee Sedol play in the final of the 23rd Fujitsu Cup (2010). 

Lee Sedol Wins GS Caltex Cup; Chen Yaoye Holds Tianyuan; BC Card Cup Finals Begin

Thursday May 10, 2012

May isn’t just a big month for US go players. The temperature is rising on the international go scene too. On May 4, Chen Yaoye 9P defended his Chinese Tianyuan (Tengen) title against up-and-coming player, Zhou Hexi 4P. Zhou faced off a strong field to top the 26th Tianyuan qualifiers for the second year in a row, but once again fell to Chen, who has now held the Tianyuan for four consecutive years. Meanwhile in Korea, Lee Sedol 9P fought back from a 2-1 disadvantage to defeat Park Younghun 9P in the (best of five) 17th GS Caltex Cup. Lee took home a cool $60,000 for his trouble. The finals of the 4th BC Card Cup start tomorrow (May 11 in the US), with Korea’s Baek Hongseok 9P set to take on China’s Dang Yifei 4P. China dominated the earlier rounds of the tournament, but Baek managed to fight his way through to the final, defeating Zhou Ruiyang 5P and Hu Yaoyu 8P along the way. 17 year old Dang Yifei’s run has been no less impressive. En route to the final, Dang defeated Lee Sedol 9P, Park Younghun 9P and Piao Wenyao 9P, among others. Both players are competing for their first international title.

Coming up very soon:

  • The 33rd World Amateur Go Championship is just getting started in Guangzhou, China. Expect updates from the E-Journal team very soon.
  • The 4th BC Card Cup finals start tomorrow. Watch them live on Baduk TV. The coverage for game 1 starts at 11:30pm, May 11, US EDT.
  • The 67th Japanese Honinbo title match starts on May 15 in Kyoto, Japan.
  • This being an Olympic year – the (quadrennial) Ing Cup will begin on May 23 in Taiwan.
    For more details, see the professional Go calendar at Go Game Guru.

- David Ormerod, GoGameGuru; Photo: 17 year old Dang Yifei 4P (right) plays Piao Wenyao 9P.

New Go Films: Tokyo Newcomer & Weiqi Wonders

Monday May 7, 2012

Go features prominently in a couple of new films, one a drama, the other a documentary. In Tokyo Newcomer, Chinese go genius Yoshiryu (Qin Hao) comes to Japan to hone his skills in the game, but finds he’s too busy earning a living to study go at all. One day, he meets an old woman hawking vegetables, who turns out to be a descendant of a prestigious go family. The latest film by Jiang Qinmin – who also directed The Last Sunflower and Sky Lovers – Tokyo Newcomer is “a touching drama about true communication, transcending national borders and generation gaps, through go.” In Weiqi Wonders: Conversations About the Game of Go in China, anthropologist Marc L. Moskowitz (at right, below) interviews people in China in settings ranging from children’s schools to China’s elite Beijing University to a park where retired working class men gather to play, from child educators to those reminiscing about their own youth during the Cultural Revolution. What emerges is a fascinating cultural study as people discuss children’s education, retirement, China forty years ago and today. “As Chinese politics have changed over the last two millennia, so too has the imagery of the game,” Moskowitz notes, “from a tool to seek religious enlightenment to military metaphors, one of the noble four arts, one of the condemned “four olds”, nationalism, transnationalism, historical elitism, and futuristic hyper rationality.” The film is “witness to people’s lives, ranging from university students to working class senior citizens, professional players, people who gave up professional careers to become students, and a range of others who all share a love for this extraordinary game.” Please let us know if you hear about screenings of either of these films, so we can let EJ readers know.

Zavala Wins Mexican Youth Go Championship

Monday May 7, 2012

Lilian Zavala 9k, age 12, defeated Ogam Shakti Rojas 15k, age 11, at the finals for the Mexican Youth Go Championship (MYGC), in Cuautla Morelos, near Mexico City on March 18th.  “A full weekend trip was planned to this beautiful place,” reports organizer Siddhartha Avila, “where kids, parents, teachers and friends could enjoy the natural surroundings and have fun with different activities outdoors. There was intense go activity on Saturday morning, with matches and teaching games, later some of the kids played the first two rounds of the AGHS School Team Tournament online, while on Sunday the MYGC final game was won by Zavala.” More photos are available here
- Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Siddhartha Avila: Lilian Zavala 9k (l) vs. Ogam Shakti Rojas 15k (r).

World Amateur Championship Set for May 11-17

Sunday May 6, 2012

Top amateur go players will compete in the 33rd World Amateur Go Championship (WAGC) May 11-17 in Guangzhou, China, the first time that this event will take place in South China (click here for last year’s reports from Japan). The American Go E-Journal and Ranka online are teaming up again this year to provide daily coverage.

The field of 58 players will range in age from 13 to 67 and in official rank from 8 kyu to 8 dan. Nearly half will be newcomers to the WAGC, and eleven will still be in their teens. One teenager to watch will be 16-year-old Qiao Zhijian who has been cutting a wide swath through the Chinese tournament scene, winning the Evening News Cup to earn the right to represent China at the WAGC and then defeating the legendary Nie Weiping in the annual Evening News pro-amateur match. Three others will be Hong Kong’s 14-year-old Chan Chi-Hin, who took 15th place in the WAGC last year and then worked up to a 9-dan rating on the Kiseido Go Server, Chinese Taipei’s 7-dan Chen Cheng-Hsun, the youngest in the field, and the Czechia’s Lukas Podpera, who won the U20 division of the recent European Youth Go Championship. These four will be battling for top spots with formidable opponents from Japan, the two Koreas, Southeast Asia, Eastern and Western Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, India, and Oceania. Well-known go teacher Yuan Zhou 7d is this year’s U.S. representative.

Guangzhou, also known as Canton, is the capital city of Guangdong Province. It is enjoying great economic prosperity, flourishing development, cultural diversity and dynamic modernization. With a history of more than 2800 years, Guangzhou is forging its way ahead between its cultural heritage and fashionable skyscrapers. It offers tourists and visitors a feast of sights with unique charm, including the Flowery Pagoda, the Pearl River, the Baiyun Mountain, and the Temple of Six Banyan Trees. In 2010, when Guangzhou hosted the 16th Asian Games, the whole city improved itself comprehensively and impressed guests from all over the world with its ebullience and hospitality.

Guangzhou Chess Institute (left) has been chosen as the venue of the 33rd WAGC. Located in scenic surroundings near the Baiyun Mountain, Guangzhou Chess Institute was rated “the most culturally attractive venue of the Asian Games”. Listening to the ripple of the stream, looking around at the traditional Lingnan houses, you may think you are in a famous garden. The simple and natural design of the playing hall speaks of calmness and harmony to the players and audience.
- excerpted from Ranka Online’s report 

13-year-old Yang Dingxin 3P Wins Ricoh, Plus World Go News Round-Up

Tuesday April 10, 2012

This month in the world of professional go… April 7: 13-year-old Yang Dingxin 3P is in the news in China after defeating Piao Wenyao 9P to win the 12th Ricoh Cup. Yang, born October 19, 1998, set a new record as the youngest domestic title holder in China. He may well have broken other records too. Any record buffs out there? Write in and let us know! Elsewhere, China’s Wang Chenxing, extended her winning streak in the 2nd Huang Longshi Cup to eight consecutive games and was consequently promoted to 5P. The Huang Longshi Cup is an international win and continue tournament for women and Wang (almost single handedly) knocked out all of the Korean team and most of the Japanese team before Japan’s Xie Yimin 6P finally put a stop to it. Unfortunately for Xie, she was then left in the position of having to take on China’s four remaining players by herself. In the next game she was defeated by another youngster, Yu Zhiying 2P, and China took the Cup for a second year on April 9. Meanwhile in Japan, the Judan (10 dan) title match is underway, with title holder Iyama Yuta 9P leading Cho U 9P 2-1 in the best of five match. Iyama is defending the title after taking it from Cho last year. The next game is on April 18 in Osaka, Japan. On a lighter note, Choi Cheolhan 9P just won Korea’s Sipdan title (equivalent of the Judan). He took the opportunity to propose to his girlfriend, Yun Jihee 3P, on April 10. Choi had planned earlier to formally propose after winning the Maxim Cup in March, but his ambitious plan was foiled by Park Junghwan 9P. More about Choi Cheolhan and Yun Jihee here. Coming up this week, expect some exciting games as the BC Card Cup enters the round of 16 on April 12 and don’t forget about the Judan. See the professional go calendar for more details.
- Compiled by David Ormerod. Photo: 13-year-old Yang Dingxin 3P wins approx $40,000 USD in the Ricoh Cup.

Categories: World
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North America & Europe Among Early Outs at Chunlan Cup

Wednesday April 4, 2012

North American representative Jing Yang 8D and European representative Alexandre Dinerchstein 3P were among the 16 players eliminated in the first two rounds of the 9th Chunlan Cup, which wrapped up on April 30. Now only 8 players remain. In Round One, Yang drew Choi Cheolhan 9P, a top Korean pro known as the ‘venomous snake’ because of his aggressive fighting style. Yang fought hard and gave Choi a difficult game, but eventually resigned in the early endgame (see game below). The Chunlan Cup is an invitational Go tournament for 24 top players from around the world, which uses a knockout format. Yang qualified as the North American representative in February this year. The quarter-finals will be held in late 2012, with no specific date set yet.
- David Ormerod; based on his original article: Just 8 players left in 9th Chunlan Cup at Go Game Guru. Photo: Jing Yang (left) plays Choi Cheolhan.

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Second International Children’s Art Contest Accepting Submissions

Monday April 2, 2012

The second International Children’s Go Art Contest is now accepting submissions, and will culminate in an exhibit of the pieces at the U.S. Go Congress in North Carolina this summer.  The event is sponsored by the Mexican Youth Go Community and the AGA, in honor of the International Go Symposium.  Organizer Siddhartha Avila says “the contest will feature children’s artwork, in which they will be free to express their visions, emotions and ideas about go through painting. Its purpose is to make go culture flourish among children, and promote it through a creative exchange.”  Last year’s contest drew submissions from Japan, the Phillipines, India, the US and Mexico.  Submissions must be received in Mexico City by July 13th.  Complete information, including the submission forms and event details, can be found on the Go Symposium site. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor