American Go E-Journal » YOUR MOVE: Readers Write

Your Move/Readers Write: Cup Winner Switch; Remembering T Mark Hall

Friday December 13, 2013

Cup Winner Switch: “The recent article ‘Men’s Team & Women’s Individual Events Launch Go Competitions at SportAccord World Mind Games,’  stated that Fan Tingyu won the Bailing Cup and that Zhou Ruiyang won the Ing Cup,” writes Justin Teng, “but in fact it’s the other way around: Fan Tingyu won the Ing Cup and Zhou Ruiyang won the Bailing Cup.” Good catch, Justin; we’ve corrected the report.

Remembering T Mark Hall: “Some 20 years ago or so, I wanted to learn more about the game I  had been briefly introduced to at university and discovered there was a dan-level BGA official living close by,” writes E-Journal British correspondent Tony Collman. “I phoned him and T Mark Hall was kind enough to invite this stranger to come round for a game on the famous goban, where he demonstrated that a beginner can start with 17 stones on the board and end with nothing. In fact I didn’t get into go seriously then, but this year, after having started to really study it thanks to the magic of the internet, I was delighted to renew the acquaintance at the British Open in my home town of Stevenage. T Mark was installed in the lobby of the Cromwell Hotel, just as described by Jon Diamond (but, whether due to current anti-smoking laws or having quit, minus the pipe) and happily chatted away about GoGoD and other matters until he left for dinner. He showed no sign of his illness, nor made any reference to it and it was an honour and a privilege to have had that chance to sit with him.”

Haiku for T Mark Hall: Keith Arnold sent along this haiku in honor of the famously speedy player and GoGoD co-creator who was once banned on IGS.
speed on the go board
careful transcription to bytes
ban over, pipe out

photo: Hall at the 2010 World Amateur Go Championships in China; click here for None Redmond’s interview with him there; photo by John Pinkerton.

 

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Your Move/Readers Write: Yang Problem Correction

Thursday December 12, 2013

“On Yang’s puzzle (12/10 Member’s Edition), did you mean white to play instead of black to play?” wonders Eric Osman.
You are correct; sharp find! Sorry about that. We’ve updated the problem, so if you reload the tsumego problem link, you should see the correction.

Your Move/Readers Write: Cool 404 Message; “How to Learn Anything Fast” Features Go

Thursday December 5, 2013

Cool 404 Message: Now that OGS merged with Nova, some of the Online-Go URLs don’t work, reports avid OGS player Phil Straus, but “click here for a nice version of the 404 error message.”

“How to Learn Anything Fast” Features Go: “A book, ‘The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything Fast’ by Josh Kaufman (left), devotes a chapter to learning the game of go,” writes Chris Greene. “His light discussion introduces the basics and provides faint justice to go techniques; but, it does not replace a good beginner’s book. (Kaufman’s) focus is on demonstrating his personal learning technique/adventure.”
See our 6/18 report Expert On “How to Learn Go in 20 Hours”

 

Your Move/Readers Write: Advice on College Go

Wednesday November 20, 2013

“I am a high school student who is also a 5 Duan go player from Shanghai, China,” writes Liwei (David) Xu. “Although I continue my study, I have never given up my hobby. And I am preparing for the application of the US univeristies and I have already achieved my SAT and TOEFL scores. I hope to keep on my hobby in the university. I want to study in a university with the background of go in the US; can you give me some advice?”
“We are always delighted to hear about strong young players who are coming here!” responded EJ Youth Editor Paul Barchilon “To learn more about which colleges have a strong go playing community, visit the ACGA website.” He also suggested the Xu plan to attend the annual US Go Congress, and reach out to some of the strong players here in America, “many of whom are involved in organizing go activities in various schools.” Justin Teng, a strong player and freshman undergraduate at the University of Maryland-College Park (and now Assistant Youth Coordinator for the AGA) adds that “Many of the top universities in the country all have go clubs (Princeton, Yale, Harvard, MIT, etc). I would say University of Toronto has some of the strongest players (although it’s in Canada), along with University of Michigan-Ann Arbor and Princeton University. I can’t speak for how active all of the other university go clubs are, but I think maybe it’s best to pick a university that has a strong program for whatever major you are interested in pursuing, and then see if any of them have go clubs. I suspect you will be applying to some of the top universities, and most of them will have a go club.”

 

Your Move/Reader’s Write: Duplicating Li’s Success?

Tuesday November 19, 2013

“I read the article on Yunxuan Li pulling in 100 teens to his Go club (Yunxuan Li On How His LA School Club Pulled in 100 Teens 11/5 EJ),” writes Sid Kobashigawa of the Honolulu Go Club.  ”Can you get a copy of the attractive poster, good flyers and handouts he used to draw these teens.  He mentioned these were key to drawing so many students to his club.  The story was great but if we want to duplicate what Yunxuan is doing let’s share the actual items that he used so that go will spread.” - Editor’s response:  While Li’s club is off to a great start, his materials are fairly specific to his club and won’t be that useful for other locations.  Li’s poster is attached to this story as a pdf here: Li Poster.  It should be noted that part of why his club is so big is because Li himself is 6 dan, very enthusiastic, and very personable.  It doesn’t hurt that he lives in a town with a large percentage of Chinese Americans, who already know about go.

If your club isn’t lucky enough to have a 6 dan to teach,  the AGF and the AGA both have other resources to help.  Thanks to the work of new AGA web team volunteer Greg Smith, this information is easier than ever to find on the AGA site.  Just click on the tab that says “Teach Others” on our left menu bar.  You will find information for classes, handouts, posters, syllabi for teaching, and much more.  The best selection of posters is actually on the AGF’s Tigersmouth Website. The Downloads Section has six different posters, including one in Spanish.  Lastly, the extremely popular 11×17 Saicho Poster, that comes in AGF Starter Sets, can be purchased for just 25 cents a copy (plus shipping) directly from the AGF.   All US based programs that are teaching youth are also eligible for free equipment from the AGF as well. - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.

Your Move/Readers Write: What’s In A Name?

Saturday October 26, 2013

“I am wondering if there is a typographical error in  last week’s ‘Capture Go’ story, when Mr. Jayaraman says, ‘We call the game we teach go, not Capture Go,” writes  veteran organizer Jean DeMaiffe, a graduate of Yasuda Sensei’s International Go Teacher Certification Program. “Surely the organizers are going to call their game ‘Capture Go’ or better still, as Yasuda-sensei calls it, ‘The Capture Game’.  I have taught ‘The Capture Game’ as part of my Go curriculum for years and can readily attest to the importance of clearly differentiating between the goals of the two games.  After learning to play capture, most of my students consistently need to be refocused on capturing territory, rather than just stones. Thanks for your help in setting one or more of us straight on this issue.”
“Our curriculum is meant to serve less as an introduction to regulation go than as an in-depth introduction to the underlying principles of the game,” responds Jayaraman. “These include the basic rules of stone placement, liberties  and capturing, as well as the traditions of the game like etiquette, problem study, and history. Our use of the term ‘go’ is also rooted in some practical considerations. Our program is primarily focused on equipping teachers with no prior knowledge of go with the skills, supplies, and support to be able to introduce their students to the game. In many cases these classes may be the only time they ever hear of the game. For those whose interest in regular go is sparked, however, they and their families will be familiar enough with the game to seek out more information about it, and hopefully utilize the existing resources in our community, like the Memphis Go Club or the introductory regulation go workshops the Confucius Institute at the University of Memphis offers.  For these students who pursue it, the precise name of the specific rule variation that first set them on the path of go will probably be inconsequential.”

Your Move: Remembering Albright & Bender

Sunday October 20, 2013

“Thanks for the recent obituaries (In Memoriam: Philadelphia Go Players Hugh Albright and John Bender 10/10 EJ),” writes Bob Barber. “I think it’s a great idea to remember those with whom we’ve shared the game of go. I knew Hugh Albright very well from Congresses. He was perhaps 2 kyu when I was 10 kyu. He was always generous with his time. As I marched up to 1 dan, Hugh may have lingered at 2 kyu. We usually got in a game or two each year. I was at that lecture that John Bender gave at Congress. He looked like a model, and his companion looked like a model. And, he’d gone from zero to 4 dan in no time! I was very impressed. Now I read that he had large talents in other fields. Very sorry to hear that his intense life is over already.”

Your Move/Readers Write: Status of the AGA Rating System?

Thursday September 26, 2013

“What’s the status of the AGA rating system?” wonders EJ reader — and AGA member — Brady Daniels. “ It seems updates have become scarce recently, and I’m sure your readers would love to know why, and what solution is planned. Shouldn’t ratings be updated after every weekend tournament, or at least, say, twice a month?”
Provided that tournaments report complete and accurate results, the ratings are currently updated at least twice a month. Email ratings@usgo.org if you have other ratings-related questions or comments. 

Your Move/Readers Write: Thanks & Kudos; Gripping Stuff; Bol, Not Vonk

Friday September 6, 2013

Thanks & Kudos: “Thank you, thank you, thank you to Roger Schrag, (Go Spotting: Lan Su Chinese Garden in Portland 9/1 EJ)” writes Jean de Maiffe. “When I was in the Portland Chinese Garden in July, the board displayed appeared to have nothing whatever to do with the modern game of go. I almost wish I had taken a picture for the ‘then and now’ comparison. Kudos to whichever go player suggested the changes to the artist who had placed the stones attractively perhaps, but without knowledge of the game.”

Gripping Stuff: “Great coverage of the WAGC,” writes EJ British correspondent Tony Collman. “Gripping stuff. Thanks to Michael Redmond for the lucid commentaries.”

Bol, Not Vonk:
“The photograph accompanying the 9/1 news item ‘EuroGoTV Update’  is of Jan Bol, not Bert Vonk,” writes Jaap K. Blom.
We apologize for the error, which has been corrected.

Your Move/Readers Write: More Strong Players; World Go News A Plus

Sunday September 1, 2013

More Strong Players: “The University of Michigan go club has strong players,” writes Alex Heath (Your Move/Readers Write: Strongest Go Clubs?  8/28 EJ). “They won the Collegiate Go League championship games undefeated with Zifan Yang 7d (though he told me he was a 9d on tygem), Seungjin Lee 7d, Troy Zhao 7d, John Starkweather 5d and Anbo Chen 4d.”

World Go News A Plus: “I was very surprised to see the ‘”Where’s U.S. Go News?’ item in the most recent E-Journal,” writes Nate Eagle. “The E-Journal maintains an impressive pace, especially given the relatively small go community in the United States. I’m very happy to get news about go in the rest of the world. Frankly, I’d enjoy even more coverage by Americans about go activity in other countries. Things like the Power Report are a great start, but I’d love to get more stories about the rich world of go that happens beneath the top title matches. Thanks for all of the great work you guys do – the E-Journal is the best part of my AGA membership.”