American Go E-Journal » YOUR MOVE: Readers Write

Your Move/Readers Write: What’s In A Name?

Saturday October 26, 2013

“I am wondering if there is a typographical error in  last week’s ‘Capture Go’ story, when Mr. Jayaraman says, ‘We call the game we teach go, not Capture Go,” writes  veteran organizer Jean DeMaiffe, a graduate of Yasuda Sensei’s International Go Teacher Certification Program. “Surely the organizers are going to call their game ‘Capture Go’ or better still, as Yasuda-sensei calls it, ‘The Capture Game’.  I have taught ‘The Capture Game’ as part of my Go curriculum for years and can readily attest to the importance of clearly differentiating between the goals of the two games.  After learning to play capture, most of my students consistently need to be refocused on capturing territory, rather than just stones. Thanks for your help in setting one or more of us straight on this issue.”
“Our curriculum is meant to serve less as an introduction to regulation go than as an in-depth introduction to the underlying principles of the game,” responds Jayaraman. “These include the basic rules of stone placement, liberties  and capturing, as well as the traditions of the game like etiquette, problem study, and history. Our use of the term ‘go’ is also rooted in some practical considerations. Our program is primarily focused on equipping teachers with no prior knowledge of go with the skills, supplies, and support to be able to introduce their students to the game. In many cases these classes may be the only time they ever hear of the game. For those whose interest in regular go is sparked, however, they and their families will be familiar enough with the game to seek out more information about it, and hopefully utilize the existing resources in our community, like the Memphis Go Club or the introductory regulation go workshops the Confucius Institute at the University of Memphis offers.  For these students who pursue it, the precise name of the specific rule variation that first set them on the path of go will probably be inconsequential.”

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Your Move: Remembering Albright & Bender

Sunday October 20, 2013

“Thanks for the recent obituaries (In Memoriam: Philadelphia Go Players Hugh Albright and John Bender 10/10 EJ),” writes Bob Barber. “I think it’s a great idea to remember those with whom we’ve shared the game of go. I knew Hugh Albright very well from Congresses. He was perhaps 2 kyu when I was 10 kyu. He was always generous with his time. As I marched up to 1 dan, Hugh may have lingered at 2 kyu. We usually got in a game or two each year. I was at that lecture that John Bender gave at Congress. He looked like a model, and his companion looked like a model. And, he’d gone from zero to 4 dan in no time! I was very impressed. Now I read that he had large talents in other fields. Very sorry to hear that his intense life is over already.”

Your Move/Readers Write: Status of the AGA Rating System?

Thursday September 26, 2013

“What’s the status of the AGA rating system?” wonders EJ reader — and AGA member — Brady Daniels. “ It seems updates have become scarce recently, and I’m sure your readers would love to know why, and what solution is planned. Shouldn’t ratings be updated after every weekend tournament, or at least, say, twice a month?”
Provided that tournaments report complete and accurate results, the ratings are currently updated at least twice a month. Email ratings@usgo.org if you have other ratings-related questions or comments. 

Your Move/Readers Write: Thanks & Kudos; Gripping Stuff; Bol, Not Vonk

Friday September 6, 2013

Thanks & Kudos: “Thank you, thank you, thank you to Roger Schrag, (Go Spotting: Lan Su Chinese Garden in Portland 9/1 EJ)” writes Jean de Maiffe. “When I was in the Portland Chinese Garden in July, the board displayed appeared to have nothing whatever to do with the modern game of go. I almost wish I had taken a picture for the ‘then and now’ comparison. Kudos to whichever go player suggested the changes to the artist who had placed the stones attractively perhaps, but without knowledge of the game.”

Gripping Stuff: “Great coverage of the WAGC,” writes EJ British correspondent Tony Collman. “Gripping stuff. Thanks to Michael Redmond for the lucid commentaries.”

Bol, Not Vonk:
“The photograph accompanying the 9/1 news item ‘EuroGoTV Update’  is of Jan Bol, not Bert Vonk,” writes Jaap K. Blom.
We apologize for the error, which has been corrected.

Your Move/Readers Write: More Strong Players; World Go News A Plus

Sunday September 1, 2013

More Strong Players: “The University of Michigan go club has strong players,” writes Alex Heath (Your Move/Readers Write: Strongest Go Clubs?  8/28 EJ). “They won the Collegiate Go League championship games undefeated with Zifan Yang 7d (though he told me he was a 9d on tygem), Seungjin Lee 7d, Troy Zhao 7d, John Starkweather 5d and Anbo Chen 4d.”

World Go News A Plus: “I was very surprised to see the ‘”Where’s U.S. Go News?’ item in the most recent E-Journal,” writes Nate Eagle. “The E-Journal maintains an impressive pace, especially given the relatively small go community in the United States. I’m very happy to get news about go in the rest of the world. Frankly, I’d enjoy even more coverage by Americans about go activity in other countries. Things like the Power Report are a great start, but I’d love to get more stories about the rich world of go that happens beneath the top title matches. Thanks for all of the great work you guys do – the E-Journal is the best part of my AGA membership.”

Your Move/Readers Write: Where’s U.S. Go News?; Jie Li Strong But Not Pro; More On Strong Go Clubs

Friday August 30, 2013

Where’s U.S. Go News? “No U.S. go news at all?” writes Allan Abramson in response to the 8/29 EJ, which featured reports on go in Japan and the UK. “Perhaps someone needs to be assigned to make or find news?”
We welcome go news from across the United States and around the world; send reports and photos to us at journal@usgo.org

Jie Li Strong But Not Pro: “While Jie Li is undoubtably quite strong, he’s not actually a professional, let alone 9P,” writes Pierre Mohan (“Where are the strongest Go Clubs” 8/29 EJ). “He’s an amateur,” confirms Brian Allen. “However, he is 9.27 in the AGA ratings, only a stone away from Myung Wan Kim 9p at 10.25 in the AGA ratings.”

More On Strong Go Clubs: “Regarding today’s ‘Your Move’ (“Where are the strongest Go Clubs” 8/29 EJ), Joy Craft may be interested in visiting the website of the Bay Area Go Player’s Association, since she lives in the SF Bay Area,” suggests Steve Burrall.

Your Move/Readers Write: Strongest Go Clubs?; “First 20 Hours” Redux

Wednesday August 28, 2013

Strongest Go Clubs? “Can you tell me where the strongest go clubs are in the US?” asks Joy Craft. “I live in CA near Stanford University and want to know what cities in the US have serious clubs with professional players.”
Jie Li 9P has been showing up at the Greater Washington Go Club lately, the Seattle Go Center routinely hosts pros and strong players, and we hear that very strong players show up at clubs in LA and San Francisco as well. If other clubs have strong players attending, email us at journal@usgo.org. Club contact info is online here.

“First 20 Hours” Redux: “In the book “The First 20 Hours: How to Learn Anything…Fast” by Josh Kaufman, there is a whole chapter devoted to Go in a nutshell,” reports Vincent DiMattia.
See our 6/18 report Expert On “How to Learn Go in 20 Hours”

Your Move/Readers Write: Flummoxed by Crosstabs; Next Best Thing to Being There; More On the Gmail Fix

Tuesday August 13, 2013

Flummoxed by Crosstabs: “I am flummoxed,” writes Jean de Maiffe. “The E-J says ‘Click here for complete U.S. Open results and game records. Click here for final results and game records from the NAMT and SPO tournaments’ but I clicked on each of the three links and never got to any game records.  What am I missing? By the way, I was surprised at how much I enjoyed looking through the results of tournaments.  My eyes lit up every time I saw a familiar name with a face I could put to it.  You and your team have done your usual fine job, and we, your audience, are duly appreciative, I’m sure.”
You need to look for any result that’s underlined. For example, in the US Open Crosstab, Zi Yang Hu’s Round 1 game — W14+ — is underlined, and when you click on it, the game record will come up. Since only top boards were recorded, just click on “Player” at the top left to put them in player order and you should be able to find the game records easily. We’re happy that tracking the results was interesting and useful!

Next Best Thing to Being There: “Thanks so much to the E-Journal staff for the great coverage of the Congress!” writes Laura Kolb Moon. “I wish I could have been there in person, but the E-Journal stories and live KGS coverage of top boards made the week fun anyway. A special thanks to the game recorders who not only shared the games with the world but also provided comments about the players’ actions and appearance that made it possible to imagine being right there watching the game.”
So glad we could bring the Congress to those who could not be there; thanks for reading and watching! photo: The EJ’s Andrew Jackson records a NAMT game; photo by Phil Straus

More On the Gmail Fix: “You can fix gmail going into the wrong tab by simply dragging the email into the right tab,” writes Paul Mitchell. “Gmail will ask you if you want to do that with all email from that source, and if you answer yes then all email from that source will be routed to the tab you selected.”

Your Move/Readers Write: Following Congress Tournaments; Watching Congress Games on an iPad

Friday August 2, 2013

Following Congress Tournaments: “Since I (and the large majority of AGA members / US go players) cannot attend the U.S. Go Congress,” writes Kate Collin, “the most important thing for me is to have an up-to-date reference regarding what’s going on with the tournaments. I’d love to have something like the daily sports section of my newspaper, that would tell me: Results, Current standings, Broadcast schedule. I notice that the Congress web site does not even seem to be set up to anticipate posting results, which is frustrating, and I don’t see a central place on the AGA web site that would do that either. Another thing that would be very useful, since I generally won’t be able to watch games live, would be a reference for what KGS IDs are used to broadcast the various games, so that it is possible to search the archive for the games. Good luck! And thanks in advance for your efforts!”
The E-Journal will once again be coordinating tournament coverage, including broadcasting top-board games on KGS (mornings 9-12 and evenings 7-11; look for USGO), and posting results, game records and photos. Click here to see an example of the 2012 U.S. Open tournament grid; our post-Congress wrap-up from last year also includes grids from the NAIM and Strong Player’s Open as well as pro game commentaries and more, all of which we expect to do again this year. We also try to do a daily recap in the EJ of highlights from each tournament and other Congress events. If there’s more or other coverage readers are interested in, just let us know and we’ll do our best to get it for you!

Watching Congress Games on an iPad: “Can I use my Ipad to watch the games from the Congress?” wonders Joe Walters. “If so, how?”
Unfortunately, probably not, since iPads can’t run the KGS java client. “People have done this by running the client on their computer and then sending the display output to their iPad,” KGS’ Bill Shubert tells the EJ, “but I don’t personally know how to do this, so I think an iPad won’t work at this time.” If anyone has information on how to make KGS work on an iPad, let us know at journal@usgo.org and we’ll pass it along.

 

Your Move/Readers Write: More Go Music

Sunday July 28, 2013

“As another fan of Pentangle, John Renbourn and Bert Jansch, let me add my thanks to that of Steve Burrall for bringing their love of go to light,” (Go Spotting: Brit Folkies Bert and John 7/14 EJ) writes Michael Goerss. “I’ve got their CD on order (already have all the old Pentangle 33’s on CD) and the Yamashita now, too.  But in terms of music, don’t forget the Japanese jazz group Hiroshima.  They had a CD titled Go, with a cover featuring an empty go board.  I can’t speak to how it relates to the game, but I like the music.  Jazz koto, what could be better?”