American Go E-Journal » Youth

Jeremy Chiu Wins Ing’s Cup Youth Go Tournament

Saturday November 26, 2016

The 19th Ing’s Cup Youth Go Tournament was held Sunday, November 6 at the Kungfu Fei SiFu Academy in San Jose, CA. 2016.11.26_ ing youth collageOne of the most prominent youth go tournaments in the US, the tournament is directed annually by Mingjiu Jiang 7P and sponsored by the Ing’s Goe Foundation. This year, the top division included current Redmond Cup champions Jeremy Chiu and Ary Cheng, former Redmond champion Aaron Ye, as well as former US representatives to the World Youth Go Championship Matthew Cheng, Raymond Feng, and Eric Liu. Jeremy Chiu 7d won Division A with a perfect 3-0 record; Daniel Liu came 2nd and Aaron Ye 3rd with 2-1 records each.

Winner’s report: Division A: 1st place: Jeremy Chiu, 2nd place: Daniel Liu, 3rd place: Aaron Ye; Division B: 1st place: Tina Li, 2nd place: Steven Chen, 3rd place: Yi Co Deng; Division C: 1st place: Delin Fang, 2nd place: Jessica Liu, 3rd place: Brian Kui; Division D: 1st place: Feiyun Chen, 2nd place: Kevin Zhang, 3rd place: Jingfan Feng

- report by Mingjiu Jiang; photos courtesy Jeremy Chiu

 

 

 

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Young Lions Deadline Sunday

Monday November 21, 2016

younglion_front_1Registration for the annual Young Lions Tournament closes Nov. 27th. Organized by the American Go Honor Society (AGHS),  the tournament  welcomes kids 18 and younger who have not graduated from high school yet. The tournament will be on December 4th and 11th. There will be four rounds and trophies will be awarded to the top finishers of each bracket. In addition, AGHS t-shirts will be given to the top four finishers of each bracket. Players do not need to compete in all of the four games to participate. For more info, click here; to register, click here.

 

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AGF College Scholarships Available

Sunday November 13, 2016

AGF-logo-smallApplications are now being accepted for the American Go Foundation(AGF) college scholarshipThe program  recognizes high school students who have served as important youth organizers and promoters for the go community . To apply, download and complete the application form here.  Applicants should describe their accomplishments and volunteer work in a short essay. Letters of recommendation may also be included. Applicants whose enthusiasm and ambition have helped spread go in under-served areas will be given special consideration. Strong players who spend much of their time voluntarily teaching will also be considered, although the award focuses on promoters and organizers who have made substantial contributions during their go career. Applications are due Dec. 11th this year. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  

 

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Young Lions Tourney Open for Registration

Monday November 7, 2016

14794103_1807097989502517_1019931161_nRegistration for the annual Young Lions Tournament is now open, through November 26th. Organized by the American Go Honor Society (AGHS),  the tournament  welcomes kids 18 and younger who have not graduated from high school yet. “This is a great platform for talented young players to compete with and learn from each other,” says AGHS Promotions Head Albert Yen. The tournament will be on December 4th and 11th. There will be four rounds and trophies will be awarded to the top finishers of each bracket. In addition, AGHS t-shirts will be given to the top four finishers of each bracket. Players do not need to compete in all of the four games to participate. For more info, click here; to register, click here.
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Seminar on Strategy Games at Cambridge Not Child’s Play

Wednesday October 19, 2016

 

IMG_20161002_113336An international seminar on strategy games was held at Cambridge University, England, on October 1st and 2nd. Organized by ChessPlus, and co-sponsored by Google’s Deepmind, the event drew about 40 teachers from 15 countries, who shared their expertise on teaching go, chess and other games in schools. The first day began with a compelling presentation from Dr. Barry Hymer, Professor of Psychology in Education at the University of Cumbria, in Lancaster. Hymer provided a brief introduction to mindset theory, and what it does and doesn’t say about achievement as it relates to strategy games. He contrasted two different mindsets: fixed vs. growth. Those with the former believe intelligence is a fixed trait that can’t be changed, while those with the latter believe intelligence is cultivated through learning. Dr. Hymer’s chart (below, at right) shows how these mindsets play out. All of us exhibit some of both types of mindsets at times, and in different areas.

Hymer also expounded on some mindset myths, which included the belief that natural ability and talent don’t exist, or that they don’t matter, and that hard work guarantees ultimate success. Instead, multiple factors come into play to create success, including what Hymer calls metacognitive strategies (how we think about thinking). Hymer noted Gary Kasparov, from the chess world, felt the same way: “It’s not enough to work hard and study late into the night. You must also become intimately aware of the methods you use to reach your decisions.” In a later presentation, Hymer discussed some educational studies with a few surprising results, including that praising students does not lead to any greater level of excellence or even motivation. Negative feedback also does not help.Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 3.31.47 PM Instead, Hymer advocates engaged, attentive, and non-judgmental feedback, which he said helps create self-motivated students who then cultivate the love of learning for themselves. These types of students outperform all other categories by as much as 30%, said Hymer. An example of this from the go community would be the kinds of questions one asks in a teaching game: “What were you hoping to achieve when you went here? How do you think your opponent might respond? Were there other places you thought of playing, and why?” Getting a student to think about how they reached their decisions is key to creating autonomous learners in Hymer’s approach.

Hymer’s presentation was followed by an equally engaging one from Jorge Nuno Silva, of the University of Lisbon (Portugal). Professor Silva gave a lecture on the intellectual history of games in education. Drawing on games from across the centuries (most now completely forgotten) Silva illustrated how and why games are important to learning. Along the way he fascinated the audience with stories of strange and interesting games, including Rythmomachia: ”Invented as a pedagogical game, to help the teaching of Arithmetic, in the 11th century. Even the setup of the pieces on the board was an important experience. It was popular everywhere where Boethius’ Arithmetic was taught. It vanished, naturally, in the 17th century, as mathematics developed in a different way. Chess then took over.”jorge

The seminar continued with presentations from teachers and specialists from all over the world. Daniela Trinks of Myongji University in Korea spoke on the didactics of go, and Stefan Löffler spoke on the didactics of chess. Mads Jacobsen, from Denmark, spoke about the extraordinary success of chess programs in his country, where 30% of all schools have chess as a scheduled activity. Toby Manning of the British Go Association, and Paul Barchilon of the American Go Foundation both spoke on efforts to introduce go to more schools in their respective countries. “The beautiful rooms of Cambridge University provided a wonderful environment for these two days of learning, teaching, discussing, inspiration and forming cooperations,” said Daniela Trinks. “The success of this seminar proves once more that chess and go teachers shouldn’t see each other as rivals but as colleagues who have a lot in common. By sharing our experiences we can learn from each other, improve teaching praxis and develop more successful educational programs at schools in the future.”

The main organizers were John Foley, Stefan Löffler, Rita Atkins and John Upham from Chessplus. The seminar was sponsored by DeepMind, and supported by the British Go Association, the European Go Federation, the European Go Cultural Centre, the American Go Foundation and the UK Backgammon Federation. An online documentation of the seminar, including videos, photos and presentation files is planned. Interested readers can see the program, and associated slideshows, for all segments highlighted in blue on this page. -Story and photos by Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Top: Seminar participants take a break on the lawn at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge;  Lower right: Slide from Dr. Barry Hymer’s presentation; Lower left: Professor Jorge Nuno Silva shows the board for Rythmomachia.

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Chiang Tops Sunflower Happy Cup

Monday October 10, 2016

IMG_099612th-grader Anthony Chiang 6d topped the Ninth Sunflower Happy Cup Youth Go Tournament, with all three wins, on Sep 26 in Cupertino, California. “Forty-three kids from 5 to 17 gathered together on a beautiful Sunday afternoon and played three to five rounds of 13×13 and 19×19 games,” reports Yanping Zhao, who co-organized the event with Wenguang Wang.  Players earned prize tickets after each round, and then used them to exchange various fancy prizes. “It was our way to ensure a really fun experience for every kid,” reports Zhao.  Each participant was also rewarded with a trophy and at the event’s conclusion, all the kids and their parents enjoyed a refreshing ice cream party.  - Report by Wenguang Wang; photo by Yu Hsiu Chiou: A young contestant studies the board earnestly.
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Student Oza registration closes in one week

Saturday October 8, 2016

The 15th World Students Go Oza Championship is now open for registration. The main tournament will be held in Tokyo from Feb 20 to 24, 2017. An online preliminary round on Pandanet will be held to select the 16 students.  Details here; the entry form can be filled out online.
University/College students under the age of 30 may participate in the preliminary round, including graduate students. The application deadline is Oct 17. Note that students living in China, Korea, Japan and Chinese Taipei may not participate in the online preliminary round.
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Categories: Youth
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Chicago Schools Learn Art of Go

Thursday September 22, 2016

12742712_913577522095202_7328750880063231338_n“About 3000 students in the Chicago Public Schools, and another 2,500 students from suburban districts,  learned weiqi (go) during the last school year,” reports Xinming Simon Guo, 2015 AGF Teacher of the Year and founder of Go and Math Academy in Illinois. “Weiqi is not only an educational manipulative in the math classroom, but also a new way to extend the horizon of students in the language classroom,” adds Guo. September 17th was an Artist In Residence workshop day for Chinese language teachers in the Chicago schools.  “We organize this annual workshop at the beginning of every new school year, to bring culture into Chinese language classrooms, and enhance language teaching and learning, ” says Jane Lu, director of the Confucius Institute in Chicago and the coordinator of the CPS Chinese World Language Program. Local artists are invited to present and demonstrate different types of Chinese cultural activities, including Kung Fu, Chinese folk dancing, Chinese painting, paper cutting, and weiqi. Teachers in the workshop can apply to introduce these cultural and art activities to their classrooms if they want to. “Weiqi has been the most popular project among Chinese teachers in Chicago Public Schools since its debut in 2013,” says Guo, “during the last three years, about half of the Chinese teachers have chosen weiqi for their students. After the latest workshop, several new teachers also showed great interest and planned to apply for more classroom instruction.” -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor Photo by Xinming Simon Guo: students in Arlington Heights learn go.

 

 

 

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Registration opens for World Students Go Oza Championship prelim

Tuesday September 20, 2016

An online preliminary round will be held on Pandanet to select the 16 students who will participate in the 15th World 2016.09.20_14th-student-ozaStudents Go Oza Championship February 20-24, 2017 in Tokyo, Japan to decide the world’s number one student player.
Click here for details and here for the entry form.

University or college students under the age of 30 can participate in the preliminary round, although students living in China, Korea, Japan and Chinese Taipei cannot participate in the online preliminary round. The application deadline is Oct 17. For further information, email sota@pandanet.co.jp or the All-Japan Students GO Association at world.sgo.oza@gmail.com.

photos: at the 14th World Students Go Oza

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Categories: Japan,Youth
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AGHS Applicants Wanted

Friday September 16, 2016

aghs logoThe American Go Honor Society (AGHS) is looking for volunteers. “For all you high school students out there: Are you looking for ways to promote go?” asks new Co-President Brandon Ho. “The AGHS is still looking for applicants, and you’re free to join. The AGHS runs youth tournaments like the School Team Tournament and Young Lions, and by joining, you can help us run them.” Fill out the application here 2016AGHSOfficerApp (3) and email it to aghspresident@gmail.com. Applications are due by September 19 and officers will be selected by September 26.

 

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