American Go E-Journal » Youth

Go Classified: Teacher Wanted in San Jose

Wednesday August 6, 2014

I have been teaching at the Berryessa Chinese School for 14 years now and am honored to have had this opportunity,” writes Jean deMaiffe.  “Because of my rewarding relationship with BCS, I am hoping to help them find other (preferably English-fluent) regular and substitute go teachers for their culture program. BCS has three campuses in the Berryessa neighborhood of San Jose, California.  One is for ‘the little kids’, one for the middle range (roughly eight through twelve years old) and one for high schoolers.  My venue has been the middle range school, which I have very much enjoyed. Currently, BCS needs a teacher for the high school, may need one for the little kids, and may also need one for my school this coming year or the year after (negotiable) when I plan to retire.  Clearly, if a teacher does well with the BCS school students, the teaching relationship can continue indefinitely.  The middle school has its own equipment and a set of problem books.  BCS has been willing to acquire classroom materials as necessary for my class.  Interested teachers can contact BCS directly through their website, and may contact me via email at jean@dougandjean.com

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IGF Launches Facebook Page

Tuesday August 5, 2014

The International Go Federation has launched a Facebook page and is urging go players worldwide to check it out and “like” the page. Recent posts include photos and updates from the European Go Congress in Sibiu, Romania as well as promoting the upcoming US Go Congress, which starts this Saturday in New York City.

McCormick Elementary Students Learn Go (And Math)

Tuesday July 29, 2014

Students at McCormick Elementary, in Chicago, IL, had the opportunity recently to learn to play go from Xinming Simon Guo 2d, a licensed math teacher and founder of the GoAndMath Academy. “Students were playing a simple game during the class, blissfully unaware that they were also working on math skills as they put every stone on the board and counted the result at the end of the game,” Guo told the E-Journal.

At McCormick, the go class is part of the Chinese Artists-In-Residency Program, co-sponsored by Confucius Institute in Chicago (CIC) and GoAndMath Academy. The Chinese language teachers at McCormick — where 99.5% of the students are hispanic and 50% are English Language Learners – Ms. Yeh and Ms. Huang, heard about the go program during the professional workshop organized by CIC last year. “Go is an ideal tool to achieve the goal of our Chinese curriculum–to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture, and reinforce their learning of language skills,” says Guo. “During the entire 2013-2014 school year, the go program offered more than 130 learning sections to more than 4500 students in Chicago public schools,”  said Jane Lu, the director of CIC and coordinator of CPS Chinese World Language Program.

“Go is not just a simple game,” says Guo. “Research by GoAndMath Academy reveals that there exists a hidden natural connection between math and go. Students can experience math concepts without even noticing them. More specifically, go helps students develop number sense, and three domains in Common Core standards: Counting and Cardinality; Operations and Algebraic Thinking; and Number and Operations in Base Ten. GoAndMath Academy designed the educational go program, which is appropriate for Pre-K through eighth grade, is aligned with the common core standards, and can be played with peers in school or around the world. This fantastic game combines math, science, art, and competition, as well as ancient oriental philosophy and culture. Go requires the highest level of critical thinking. It cultivates the abilities of observing, reflecting, imagining, reasoning, innovating, and decision-making,” says Guo.
- Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo: Guo demonstrates the secrets of holding the go stone.

BadukTV Hires Shawn Ray

Monday July 21, 2014

BadukTV has hired Shawn Ray 4d, better known as Clossius to his YouTube and KGS fans, to do a series of lessons in English for the network. “Thanks to the success of my YouTube channeI, I was offered a job at BadukTV – on the condition that I relocate to Korea,” Ray told the E-Journal. “I took this opportunity to move to Seoul and study baduk  (go in Korean) seriously. I am planning to stay until I become 9D and then I want to come back to America to become a Pro player in the AGA.” Ray’s first video for BadukTV, which includes a fun animated opening, is available here.

“I chose Blackie’s International Baduk Academy (BIBA), as it was the only baduk school that I knew of that spoke English,” said Ray. “Since arriving, I have learned how to truly study baduk, and how many hours you really have to put into this game to become strong. I am sure many are interested in my training schedule so I will break it down.  We wake up and get to BIBA around 11 or noon, and stay until 9 pm. Once we arrive it is self-study until about 2pm, then we play league games with players stronger and weaker than ourselves. In between games we do more self-study, until about 5 or 6 pm and then go eat dinner. We get back around 7 pm and Blackie (9p) reviews our games, or goes over pro games with us and helps us understand them. It is nice when a 9P helps you review pro games, because then you can see that they are human too and also make mistakes. Just mistakes you would never notice being an amateur!  Once 9 pm hits, we all go home together. Once we get home, some of us do more studying, or we can relax until we go to sleep.”

“Our self-study consists of reviewing at least 4 pro games a day, doing at least 1 hour, or more, of life and death problems. Problems at your level can take anywhere from 1-5 min. Usually we go through nearly 100 problems per week. We also study Baduk books and analyze positions and new openings or joseki. It is a very intensive schedule to maintain and can mentally exhaust you very quickly. It took me a whole week before I was fully able to deal with the training regimen,” said Ray.

“My dream is to become a Pro player and start a go school in the U.S. and find a way to make a living teaching go. It is my hope that I can help raise the level in the U.S. so that one day we can compete internationally with the top Asian players. I have to thank all my friends and followers for their support, otherwise I would have never made it this far. In addition I would like to thank Jennie Shen 2P, who has been my teacher ever since I started playing go. Lastly, the inspiration to think I can still become pro is due to Andy Liu 1P, who is around the same age as me, yet is one of the top players in our country. It is my hope to rise to his level, and he showed me it was possible even at my age,” said Ray. Interested readers can join Clossius’s Go Group on Facebook, where he will be posting about his adventures, and even offering discounts on go books. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Image courtesy of BadukTV.

 

Mexican Youth Tourneys Cap School Year

Wednesday July 9, 2014

School kids in Mexico City capped off their year with tourneys in two locations, reports organizer Siddhartha Avila. “We gave the North american Kyu Championship prizes sent by the American Go Association to Valeria Gonzalez and Samuel Suástegui,” said Avila. “All the kids received a kanji, made by artist Yuko Kosaka, that conveyed a good wish or thought for their lives. We are thankful to have such wonderful people around us, congrats to all the young go players! Pictures of the event can be seen here. Our final tourney was July 5th, it was organized for the students at Gimnasio de Go and hosted by Templo Budista Eko, the tournament was divided in two brackets, 16-20 kyu and 10-15 kyu. We also held a tourney at a Chinese School,Instituto de Idioma y Cultura China, on June 21st.  Players ranging from the ages of 5 to 11 competed on 13×13 boards, 1st place went to Nicholas Moran,” Avila reports. Pictures of the event can be seen here. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photos: top: Siddhartha Avila (standing) observing a game at the Chinese school match; bottom: students compete at the Templo Budista.

Winners report, Gimnasio de Go: 10-15k Bracket: 1. Omar Zavala; 2. Lilian Zavala; 3. Valeria Gonzalez; 4. Paula Herrera; 5. Diego Armando Luciano. 16-20k Bracket: 1. Marcos Gonzalez; 2. Rodrigo Villegas; 3. Dante Zavala; 4. Sebastián Bañuelos; 5. Diego Alí. 

Aji’s Quest Concludes

Monday July 7, 2014

Aji’s Quest, the popular online comic about a quoll who plays go, has published its last panel, author Colette Bezio announced on July 5th.  Her comic strip was launched two years ago and has grown to 180 pages, and attracted an international audience of kids and adults. Fans followed the witty adventures of a quoll named Aji, on his long quest to become a go master.  On the way he encounters a huge variety of go playing animals and creatures, all of whom illustrate different aspects of the game, and provide some kind of lesson to help Aji along the way. “A sequel is possible… I even have a couple of ideas,” said Bezio, “but I have to get back to some other projects before I even think about it seriously.”  The strip can be read on Bezio’s website here, and was also featured on Tigersmouth. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Drawing by Colette Bezio: Aji confronts his worst nightmare, the evil white stones monster.

Zhang Wins Happy Cup Youth Tourney

Thursday July 3, 2014

The annual Sunflower Happy Cup Youth Go Tournament, in Cupertino, drew 44 kids this year, reports organizer Wenguang Wang.  8th grader Wilson Zhang was the winner in group A with 4 wins.  “It was a super hot afternoon, which made the ice cream party at the end of the tournament very refreshing,” Wang told the Journal. The event was held June 8th, at the Sunflower Chinese School. More photos can be seen here.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Wenguang Wang.

Sun Named AGHS President; Call for Officers

Monday June 30, 2014

Calvin Sun 1P has been selected as the new American Go Honor Society (AGHS) President. “I’m really glad to be the President for AGHS this year,” Sun told the Journal. “This has always been a goal for me because I feel like go has lost much of its popularity in the past couple of years in the United States, especially among kids. I wish to bring back the enthusiasm that children had for go when I first started the game. I am very excited for another year of hard work and fun.” The AGHS runs the popular School Teams Tourney, the Young Lions, and other youth events as well.  Outgoing Co-President Andrew Huang 6d issued a call to ” all young go players and enthusiasts who are interested in becoming  leaders in promoting and teaching go across the country. I encourage you to apply for an officer position. We will be led by Calvin Sun next year, but we still have openings for vice president, tournament organizer, treasurer, secretary, promotion head, and webmaster. We recommend that you only apply if you will be in high school next year. The application form can be found here. This is a great opportunity for you to serve the go community, and we look forward to reading your application.” -Story and photo by Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo: Calvin Sun 1P looks into the future.

 

 

Chilean Tourney Draws 40 Kids

Friday June 27, 2014

“Forty children between the ages of five and sixteen competed at the first inter-school go tournament, in Punta Arenas, Chile, on Saturday June 6th,” reports organizer Sebastian Montiel.  “Three categories were played depending on the experience of the participants: 13×13, 9×9 and Atari-Go.” The tourney was held at Colegio Luterano, with five schools competing, and was organized by the Aonken Go Club.  First place winner in the 13×13, Matias Salinas, age 13, writes “I would like Punta Arenas to become world famous in the world of go, and for people from other countries to travel to this city just to play go.” Aonken Go Club, which joined the Chilean Go Federation as an official club in 2013, has been promoting Go in Punta Arenas vigorously.  Aonken, another name for the  indigenous language of Tehuelche, means south. “This name represents our geographical location in the world and pays tribute to the original people of our land,” according to the Aonken Go Club Website, which can be seen here, or translated into English, here.

Winner’s Report: 13×13 Category: First place: Matías Salinas, Colegio Luterano; Second place: Elian Velasquez, Colegio Luterano; Third place: Benjamin Mimiza, Colegio Luterano; Fighting Spirit: Manuel Acuña, Colegio Luterano. 9×9 Category: First place: Anastasia Sanhueza, Escuela J. Williams; Second place: Maria Trinidad Villanueva, Colegio Luterano; Third place: Joaquín Oyarzo, Contardi; Fighting Spirit: Bastían Zuñiga, Colegio Luterano.  Atari-Go Category: First place: Francisco Jerez, Colegio Luterano; Second place: Benjamin Leiva, Escuela Juan Williams; Third place: Belen, Escuela Juan Williams; Fighting Spirit: Tiare Santana, Colegio Luterano. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo by Jose Fernandez.

Categories: Go News,World,Youth
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Melchior Chui Wins UK Go Challenge for Schools

Sunday June 22, 2014

The 2014 UK Go Challenge for Schools was won by Melchior Chui 9k of Cambridge with second and third places going to siblings Roella 12k and Edmund Smith 13k respectively, also both of Cambridge. The finals were held at Milton C of E Primary School in Milton, near Cambridge, England on Saturday June 21st, and were the culmination of heats played in schools throughout the year, each of which comprised five rounds of 13×13 go.Twenty-five youngsters took part in the finals, which are not restricted to those who have taken part in the heats. Click here for full list of winners.

The top three winners and the challenger all won cash prizes and they and all age group winners got a framed certificate showing their achievement. Click here for full format details of the competition, which started in 2004 and is organized by the British Go Association and modeled on the earlier successful UK Chess Challenge.

The traditional caption contest to put words into the mouth of the logo go stones (above) in promotional material for the year was won by Benedict Steele of Milton with the caption, “Jump ahead of the competition!”

Report by Tony Collman, British correspondent for the E-Journal. Logo courtesy of UK Go Challenge website.
Correction: The Challenge started in 2004, not 20 years ago, as originally reported.