American Go E-Journal » Youth

USYGC Deadline Jan. 15

Sunday January 8, 2012

Just one week left to register for the US Youth Go Championships.  Registrations have been coming in steadily, and several brackets are looking interesting.  23 Dan level kids are in the top two brackets so far, competition will also be tough in the 1-5  kyu bracket, with 11 kids at the moment.  6-10 kyu players will have their own bracket too, and more double digit kyu players are encouraged to register.  To see who is signed up so far, go here.  To register, e-mail youth@usgo.org with your name, AGA #, date of birth, AGA rating, KGS ID, and citizenship.  You may enter at a rank higher than your official AGA rank, but may not enter at a lower one.  The registration deadline is Sunday, January 15th.  For more info, see the USYGC page. -Paul Barchilon E-J Youth Editor.

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US Youth Go Championships Jan. 21

Monday December 19, 2011

Qualifiers for the United States Youth Go Championships will be held Saturday, January 21st, on KGS.   The tourney will determine National Dan, Single Digit Kyu (SDK), and Double Digit Kyu (DDK) Champions. The winners will receive trophies, and prizes will be awarded in the following brackets: 5-7 dan 1-4 dan, 1-4 kyu, 5-9 kyu, 10-15 kyu, 16-20 kyu, 21-25 kyu, 26 and up kyu.  The qualifiers will use several formats for pairing, and all dan level youth will compete in an open section.  The top four youth will then move on to a double elimination final held on January 22nd, and continuing the following weekend. The winners of the dan sections will go on to represent the US at the World Youth Goe Championships, in August.  All expenses will be paid for the representatives to attend the tournament, in whichever country it is to be held (The Czech Republic was likely, but not confirmed, as of press time). Contestants will also be entered into a pool to receive partial scholarships to either the AGA Summer Youth Go Camp, or the US Go Congress, courtesy of the AGF, 16 Scholarships will be awarded. The Junior Division is for youth under 12, the Senior Division is for youth under 16 as of August 1, 2012.  Only US Citizens under 16 may enter the finals, youth who are under 18 may compete in the qualifiers and kyu brackets, and so may residents who are not citizens.  To register, e-mail youth@usgo.org with your name, AGA #, date of birth, AGA rating, KGS ID, and citizenship.  You may enter at a rank higher than your official AGA rank, but may not enter at a lower one.  The registration deadline is Sunday, January 15th.  For more info, see the USYGC page. -Paul Barchilon E-J Youth Editor.  Photo: USYGC Jr. Division Champion Aaron Ye 4d, competing against Russia at the 2011 World Youth Go Championships, in Bucharest, Romania.  Photo by Paul Barchilon.

20th Jujo Jiang Tourney Jan. 8

Saturday December 17, 2011

Mingjiu Jiang 7P, and the Ing Foundation, are again sponsoring the Jujo Jiang Tournament in San Francisco, CA.  Last year’s event drew 66 competitors, and similar numbers are expected this year.  All levels are welcome, there will be prizes in four divisions: Open, Dan, Kyu, and Novice, this will be an AGA rated tournament..  Jiang Jujo 9P and Rui NaiWei 9P will be in attendance again this year.  To register, and for more information, go to Gomasters.com, or e-mail Indagoe49@yahoo.com.  - Paul Barchilon. Photo: Jujo Jiang (l) plays his brother, Mingjiu Jiang (r) at the 2011 Jujo Tourney.

U.S. Youth Go Camp Future in Doubt

Saturday December 17, 2011

The future of American youth go camps is very much in question, American Go Association President Allan Abramson tells the E-Journal. “On the one hand, the camps can be a great experience for our young players. On the other hand, after the last three years’ experience of low attendance and losing money each year, the Board and I have agreed that it may be time to recognize that the Congress itself has become the Go camp, and that the AGA should not guarantee funding for a separate camp anymore.” The AGA is looking for organizers/directors for the 2012 go camp(s), Abramson says, but warns that “Those who take on the task of organizing and running the camp will need to plan carefully to break even financially, at least.” Those interested in attending a camp will need to register early, as well, to ensure the survival of the camps. “Early registration will ensure that we have enough interest to hold the camp, while procrastination will ensure that the organizers will cancel the camp, rather than lose money.” Those interested in running a camp in 2012 should contact Abramson at president@usgo.org.

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Canada 3-peats in 4th Youth Friendship Matches

Monday December 12, 2011

The future of North American go was on full display this past Sunday at the 4th US-Canada Youth Friendship Match, held on KGS and viewed by over 250 go fans.  With many exciting matches featuring intense middle games, the Canadians managed to pull away for the third year in a row, posting a 4-1 victory over the U.S.  In a rematch of last year’s top board, Ryan Li, the runner up to the 2010 and 2011 Canadian Opens, once again managed to best Calvin Sun in a close match featuring a territory versus influence battle.  Intense fighting was the theme of the next few boards, with Gansheng Shi, Jianing Gan, and Andrew Huang of Canada posting victories for Canada, and the lone American win from USYGC Champion Vincent Zhuang.  With such a strong showing overall, the North American team has a chance to reclaim victory against the European youth in the Transatlantic Match that will be played next spring. Full results can be seen here.  -Special report by Lawrence Ku

U.S. vs. Canada Youth Match Set for this Sunday

Monday December 5, 2011

The fourth annual US Canada youth friendship matches will be this Sunday, December 11 on KGS.  Five of Canada’s strongest will square off against the best young players in the US.  The players include Calvin Sun 7d, Hugh Zhang 7d, Andrew Lu 6d, and Vincent Zhuang 6d and Jimmy Yang 5d, for the US side and Ryan Li 7d, Gansheng Shi 7d, Jianing Gan 6d, Daniel Gourdeau 6d, and Andrew Huang 6d, for the Canadian side.  Matches will be held in the AGA Tournaments Room on KGS, at 4 pm ET (1 pm PT), and the public is welcome to observe. 
- Paul Barchilon, EJ Youth Editor

Li Wins Young Lions

Monday December 5, 2011

Yunxuan Li 4d topped a field of 51 players in the Young Lions Tournament on KGS last month. The tournament, organized by the American Go Honor Society, featured young players from all over the US, and a few from Canada and Mexico as well. As in previous years, the tourney brought some of North America’s strongest youth together, including current Redmond and USYGC champion Aaron Ye 5d, and Oliver Wolf 4d, former Redmond Champ. “All the games i played were very tough,” Li told the Journal, “Aaron [Ye] has awesome attacking skills and Oliver [Wolf] has a very aggressive and flexible style.” Last year’s winner in this event, Vincent Zhuang 6d, went on to represent the US in the World Youth Go Championships, Li will get a chance to make his mark in the upcoming USYGC in January. Also coming up will be the School Team Tournament, the most popular event hosted by the AGHS, with registration opening around mid-January or February. The Young Lions was directed by AGHS President Jasmine Yan, Vice-Presidents Eric Chen and Justin Teng, Viral Kotecha, Van Tran, Rebecca Cheng, and Keiju Takehara.  -Justin Teng, with Paul Barchilon.  Photo: Yunxuan Li, at right, in a casual game at Go Congress.  AGHS VP Justin Teng is watching the game.  Photo by Wenguang Wu.

Winner’s report: Division A: 1st: Yunxuan Li 4d, 2nd: Oliver Wolf 4d, 3rd: Andrei Razvan 2k; Division B: 1st: Larry Qu 2k, 2nd: Raymond Liu 6k, 3rd: Anurag Varma 2k; Division C: 1st: Zachary Peach 8k, 2nd: Benson Jay Merrill 9k, 3rd: Jerry Qiu 10k; Division D: 1st: Joshua Song 16k, 2nd: Vicente A. Cortez-Tinoco 15k, 3rd: Noah Hill 13k; Division E: 1st: Alissa 18k, 2nd: Neal Fatheringham 18k, 3rd: Monsoon Shrestha 24k.

 

Two Weeks at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy: Van Tran’s Journal (#4)

Monday November 28, 2011

July 16: Today is Saturday, but the dojang is not open today because there is a tournament for the inseis. So Om, Chisu Yun, Cho Sun Ah, Masakito and I went sightseeing. We visited an old Korean palace which was really interesting and then we went biking near the lake even though it was raining really hard. There was also an awesome playground over near the river where we went zip-lining. Afterwards we went to the mall to eat and we spent some time inside a Korean music store listening to K-pop albums. When we got home there was a barbecue dedicated to the kids that went to the tournament. I can’t say Korean barbecue is good, but it was a good experience to be a part of a large gathering of celebration in Korea.

July 19: Today is the day I go back to America. It’s sad that I have to leave just when I had just started to settle in. Before leaving I got to say bye to the handful of kids that are there in the morning. It was sad to leave the dojang and Korea. It would’ve been nice if I had got the chance to stay a bit longer and learn more. I got a lot of Korean Go books as gifts when I left. I got a book each on hangmae, pae (ko), and life and death, and a Korean Baduk magazine (which is not really helpful because I don’t understand it). I left the dojang at 12:30PM on an airport bus heading back to the Incheon Airport reading the Baduk magazine that Mr. Oh had given me. One day I look forward to come back to the dojang where I have found many good friends and teachers.

Sixteen-year-old Van Tran spent two weeks in South Korea at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy earlier this year and sent the E-Journal his report, which is appeared in the EJ this month (this is the final installment). The high school junior lives in the Houston suburb of Spring, Texas, has been playing for two and a half years and is “about 3 dan.”

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Two Weeks at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy: Van Tran’s Journal (#3)

Tuesday November 22, 2011

July 10: Sunday the dojang is closed so I went to Myongi with Om, an 18-year-old Thai player who has been there for a year. We went by subway and bus. The public transportation in Korea is quite complicated, and we had to transfer subways and buses a couple of times. When we arrived at Myongi we met with Om’s friend and we visited the Inseidong, the Korean Go Club. It fascinates me that there seem to be no weak players to be found in Korea. The club was filled with people 7-dan or stronger and there was a pro tournament on the third floor of the building. After visiting the Inseidong and shopping at Myongi we went to the cinema to watch Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2.
Photo (right): Very clean subway!

July 11: Today at the dojang, school founder Lee Sedol 9P came to teach the inseis. He seemed to be very calm and modest. He went over all of the inseis’ games and I  watched the review. I was shocked to see that Lee Sedol was able to play out a whole game after just seeing the board a few times as he went around the room. I got him to sign my fan during lunch, which he did with a smile and nod. On a side note I won all but one of my games against Kang Chang Hyo, the top player in the 10th division. I was put in the lowest league which has 2 dans to 4 dans, but through intense concentrated study for a week I went on a winning streak and was able to end up seco2nd in the league.
Photo (left): A day at the dojang

July 14: Today was a pretty good day. I won two games against people in higher leagues. One’s name was Pakchan and I don’t remember the other’s name, but they are both significantly stronger that the people in my league. Even though I was able to beat them, the headmaster wouldn’t move me up because of my losing streak in the first two days which brought down my record. I memorized another three pro games today, all played by Lee Sedol. I find his games a challenge to go over because he tenukis and plays aggressively all over the board. It takes a lot of thought to follow.

Sixteen-year-old Van Tran spent two weeks in South Korea at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy earlier this year and sent the E-Journal his report, which is appearing in the EJ this month. The high school junior lives in the Houston suburb of Spring, Texas, has been playing for two and a half years and is “about 3 dan.”

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Two Weeks at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy: Van Tran’s Journal (#2)

Monday November 14, 2011

July 8: Today, I woke up, got ready and went to the dojang a little early. I’ve started changing my style from the traditional peaceful play found frequently in the States to the somewhat reckless fighting style of the Koreans. I think it’s the best way to improve because it forces you to read further. I have also found that life and death problems are a huge part of Korean go because they come up so often in their games. Today I memorized a pro game on the recommendation of the headmaster. He says it’s not enough to go over a pro game; you have to memorize it in order to get a solid feel of the best move on intuition. I find pro games to be much more helpful now because when you memorize them you understand why professionals make each of their moves. It’s easy to gain two stones in strength by putting a purpose in each stone you play. Oh it’s  a good night because I won all my games today!
Photo (right): Dinner at the dormitory

July 9: Today is Saturday, which is kind of like a break day at the dojang. Everyone participates in a team tournament. On my team was Yu Minh and Masakito, a 7 year-old student from Japan. Both of them are 9d and aspiring professionals. I felt out of place and was given handicaps against the other players. I played a 9d insei with 6 stones and won. The next game I played with another 9d insei with 6 stones and won again. Our team won the tournament, but I knew I didn’t deserve to win because they were much stronger than me.
photo (left): Win some, lose some

Sixteen-year-old Van Tran spent two weeks in South Korea at the Lee Sedol Baduk Academy earlier this year and sent the E-Journal his report, which is appearing in the EJ this month. The high school junior lives in the Houston suburb of Spring, Texas, has been playing for two and a half years and is “about 3 dan.”

Categories: Youth
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