American Go E-Journal » Youth

Young Lions Deadline Nov. 1

Monday October 24, 2011

Over 40 players have already signed up for the Young Lions Tourney, according to AGHS VP Justin Teng. Registration closes November 1, so sign up now if you want to play. Participants must be 18 or younger and have solid, KGS or AGA ranks. Prizes will be awarded to the top three players in each of four divisions, and all ranks are welcome. Youth who want to compete should sign up here, more info on the tourney can be found  here. - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

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High School Students Could Win Free Trip to Japan

Monday October 24, 2011

Japanese American high school students are invited to apply with the Japanese Consulate for a free trip to Japan.  “I would like to introduce an invitation program for Japanese-American students by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan to you. This program invites Japanese-American students to Japan, and promotes mutual understanding between younger generations of both countries through 10 days stay in Japan,” Consul Yanagida of the Japanese Consulate in Denver, announced. Five students from all over the United States will be invited from March 9th to 20th, 2012. American high-school students whose ancestral origins are in Japan can apply to this program. For details, see the Consulate webpage.  Residents of any state can apply, but should do so to their local consulates, which are listed here.  The deadline is November 30th. - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.

Free Sample Member’s Edition Game Review: “Tiger’s Mouth” Kyu Game

Monday October 24, 2011

Today’s game review, by Feng Yun 9P, looks at a kyu level game between two young players who wish to remain anonymous.  White is just eight years old, and improving quickly.  His opponent is 14, and also a very quick learner.  This match was played during one of the monthly Tiger’s Mouth prize tournaments, sponsored by the AGF.  Website members can join the tourney, and compete for $75 worth of prizes in three different brackets.  Raffles are also held for the anime prize pack, and a complete set of Hikaru no Go manga (all 23 volumes).  Youth players 18 and under are welcome at all TM tourneys, click here for more info. NOTE: The next TM tourney will be on October 29th, click here to register. Want to see game reviews every week? Sign up now for the E-Journal Member’s Edition!

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Categories: Youth
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Korean Pro Visits Mexico

Monday October 17, 2011

The Hankuk Kiwon (Korean Go Association) sent Chun Poong Jho 9P to Mexico this month, in honor of the XIII Iberoamerican Go Tournament. Chun has promoted go internationally for decades, and speaks several languages. Local organizer Siddhartha Avila reports: “Mr. Chun visited the Pipiolo Art School and was received by teachers, parents and students. During the day the kids presented a Mexican song performance, and we had a visit from the Public Education Zone Supervisor as well, who learned about the great benefits of teaching go in kindergarden and elementary schools.  We reported on our participation  in the AGHS School Team Tournament,  and we had the National Youth Go Tournament award ceremony, as well as a conference, lectures, and simultaneous games given by Mr. Chun to the children from first grade to sixth grade.  Mr. Chun  emphasized studying harder and said we should continue working to improve the playing level of Mexican youth, so that our top players can be invited to play at international youth tournaments. There was a rich cultural experience through a session of questions and answers about Korean and Mexican culture and of course about Baduk culture. Finally we wrapped up the event with a dinner at a typical Mexican restaurant with teachers, friends and family.” More pictures from the event are here. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo:  Chun Phoong Jho 9P inspiring youngsters in Mexico City.  Photo by Siddhartha Avila.

Young Lions Roar in November

Monday October 17, 2011

Do you have what it takes to be the leader of the pride?  Registration is now open for the Young Lions Tournament, run by the American Go Honor Society (AGHS).  Last year’s winner in the dan division, Vincent Zhuang 6d, went on to represent the US at the World Youth Go Championships.  Will this year’s tourney predict our next US Champions as well?  The tourney is scheduled for November 12-13.  Participants must be 18 or younger and have solid, KGS or AGA ranks. All matches will be played on KGS in the AGHS Tournament room (Room List –> Tournaments). Prizes will be awarded to the top three in each division. Spectators are welcome, and the E-J will highlight some of the more interesting match ups.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

Moore and Yan Win AGF College Scholarships

Monday October 10, 2011

D’mitri Moore, of Detroit, MI, and Jasmine Yan, of  Edison, NJ, have each won $1,000 towards their college expenses, from the American Go Foundation.  The scholarship recognizes high school students who have served as important youth organizers and promoters for the go community, and is awarded annually.  Applications for next year’s scholarship are due by Nov. 20, more information can be found on the AGF website.  Moore launched a go club at his high school in inner city Detroit, and stuck with it through thick and thin over the next four years.  Moore’s essay for the scholarship speaks to his passion:“I believe that most inner-city children statistically fail to achieve, not because of their inability to comprehend, or actually do the school work, but because they are bored, because they are not being challenged on a level which forces them to think in a different manner in order to solve problems. The first person I introduced go to was one of these types.  Everyday, when we would have nothing to do, I would teach the rules of go to this student and everyday he would steadily improve bit by bit. His intrigue of the game spread like a wildfire and his drive to one-day defeat me spurred him to want to play and study more. A connection had been made and every good go player knows that once you have a strong, connected group of stones, you have to make extensions from it in order to amass more territory. When I told him that I wanted to start a club at Renaissance High in order to get more people (specifically youth) in the city of Detroit to play, he was very determined to help look for a sponsor while I filled out the paperwork. Within our first 3 months, our group size tripled and all of the kids who may have never ever noticed each other walking down the hallway were connecting and bonding like they had been friends for years.”  Moore entered his school in the AGHS School Teams Tourney, and was able to place fourth in the Jr. Varsity Division at their first tournament.

Jasmine Yan began teaching go as early as fifth grade, and launched go clubs at  both her middle, and high schools.  She led both teams to compete in the School Teams Tourney, and also became active as a teacher.  When the opportunity to volunteer came, Yan immediately joined the AGHS, and eventually was elected President.  In addition to running and organizing national tournaments, she helped with promotional efforts, and continued to teach locally the whole time. She first discovered go as a child in China, and wrote in her essay: “A few weeks after we had come back from China, I saw an advertisement for Feng Yun Go School, and I begged my parents to sign me up. However, in the first session, I was terrified to discover that I was the only girl, as well as the weakest in the class; for several weeks, I lost every game I played. Yet, during those difficult times, something about the game of Go persuaded me to keep playing. Nine years later, I have improved from 30 kyu to my current rank of 4 dan.”  Not concerned solely with her own development, Yan also began teaching go at her Chinese school.  “For the next three years, I taught the go class in FCD, with about ten to fifteen kids in each class. The first year was somewhat of an experiment for me. I learned that all the kids had different comprehension levels; some would understand the concepts taught immediately, and others took longer. Eventually, the kids in my class had ranks ranging from 1 dan to 25 kyu.”  Yan also represented her country, as part of the US National Team in the first Mind Sports Games in Beijing, in 2008.   - EJ Youth Editor Paul Barchilon.  Photos: Top Left: D’mitri Moore; Top Right: Jasmine Yan.


Crystal Lake High Students Learn Go

Monday October 10, 2011

Crystal Lake South High School Chinese Club, in Illiinois,  launched its first event of the semester with  an introduction to go (weiqi) by Chicago teacher and weiqi enthusiast  Simon Xinming Guo, on Sept. 22nd.  Guo came at the invitation of Ms. Lin Hsieh, the Chinese language teacher at the school.  Ms. Hsieh hopes to use Weiqi to help her students to understand Chinese culture and  to learn  strategic thinking. Altogether, about 110 students from Crystal Lake South and Cary-Grove High school learned about weiqi in their Chinese language classes. Check out Guo’s page for the event for more info. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Xinming Guo.

Ing’s Youth Cup October 23rd

Monday October 3, 2011

The 14th annual Ing’s Youth Cup Goe tournament will be held October  23rd, at the Chinese Cultural Center, in Sunnyvale California.  The popular tourney is organized by Mingjiu Jiang 7p, and sponsored by the Ing Foundation.  Last year’s event drew over 100 youth, who enjoyed prizes and trophies in ten different bands, sorted by rank.  There is also a 13×13 tournament for newer players.  Registration is $35, including lunch, but goes up by $10 if you register after October 10th.  For more information, and to register, go to Gomasters.com.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo:  Last year’s tourney, from the Go Masters site.

International Go Art Contest

Sunday September 4, 2011

The 1st International Children’s Go is Art Painting Contest received submissions from the US, Mexico, Japan, the Philippines and India,” reports Alma G. Juarez, of Mexico City. “We wanted to make go culture flourish among children, and promote it through a creative exchange with the painting contest,” Juarez told the Journal, “there were three categories A, B and C from 6 to 15 years old, and kids were free to use any technique they wanted for their artworks. All the paintings we received were amazing and we could see the creativity and love that these children have for go.”  The submissions are all online, and can be seen here.  “The decision about the finalists was hard for the panel of judges,” said Juarez, “but we can say that the experience was great for everyone. We included a Special Mention for Takumi Shimada, a four-year-old  Japanese boy. Even though his age wasn’t under any category, he submitted a painting showing his love for go and his will to learn. Also we had the finalist submission of Aaron Ye 4d, who recently represented the US at the World Youth Go Championship, he’s not just a strong go player but also a great artist!  For all the children that didn’t have the opportunity to participate in the ‘Go is Art’ Painting Contest, it will be an annual event, so don’t hesitate to send your submissions next year!” -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Quotes translated from the Spanish by Siddhartha Avila.  Photo: Jamia Mei Tolentino’s  “Happiness with Go” An entry from the Philippines.
Results

Chicago Teens Learn Chinese and Go

Sunday September 4, 2011

“This summer, fifty high school students from the Chicago area attended the Startalk Learn Chinese program, and filled their summer vacation with an intensive college-level Chinese language experience,” reports Xinming Simon Guo, “sure, they were immersed in activities typical of a language program: listening, speaking, reading and writing in Chinese. What the students did not know they were in for was the use of weiqi (go) to help them understand Chinese culture and thinking. What’s the relationship between Chinese language learning and weiqi? Research from Wellcome Trust showed that Mandarin Chinese speakers use both sides of their brains to understand language, whereas English speakers use just the left hemisphere. Meanwhile in another research study, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the brain activities of people playing chess as opposed to weiqi. The result indicated that the right hemisphere of the weiqi players worked more actively than that of the chess players during the game. By being exposed to weiqi, Chinese language learners are more likely to tap both sides of the brain and learn Chinese more quickly.”  Guo and other teachers were involved in the project, which was held at Depaul University.  A full report on the program, and more photos, is here.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo: