American Go E-Journal

National Go Center heading for April 29-30 opening

Sunday March 12, 2017

With work on the new National Go Center in northwest Washington DC “coming along nicely,” the Center is on track for its2017.03.13_NGC-collage grand opening the weekend of April 29-30, reports Center executive director Gurujeet Khalsa. “Area go clubs and volunteers have come together with sponsorship from the Iwamoto North America Foundation to make the new Center a reality,” Khalsa (right) told the E-Journal during a tour of the Center on Sunday, March 12. The photo at left shows the main playing space as demolition work concluded just over a week ago; in the photo at right, from March 12, finishing work has progressed rapidly.

Plans for the grand opening include a 4-round AGA-rated tournament, a children’s 12-and-under friendship match over Skype with children from Mexico City, and a performance by composer Haskell Small of composition “A Game of Go,” setting a classic Shusaku game to two pianos and a video.

More events are planned for the NGC’s grand opening but with just over six weeks to go, Khalsa says “volunteers of every stripe are urgently needed,” including carpenters to help build shelving, and anyone willing to donate tables, chairs, go books and equipment. Contact him at gurujeet.khalsa@nationalgocenter.org.

photos by Gurujeet Khalsa (left) and Chris Garlock (right)

Categories: U.S./North America
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AGA Master Review Series, Game 2: Master[W] vs. bandari(P) (Zhang Ziliang 2p)[B]

Saturday March 11, 2017

Latest Master commentary by Michael Redmond 9P with Chris Garlock, Managing Editor of the American Go E-Journal. In this game, Master shows how it resembles — and how it differs — from the great master Go Seigen.

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While Go Seigen emphasized quick development to the sides and center, Master in some of its’ games seems to go directly for the center, almost as if it ignores the sides.

Mexico City Bests Portland

Friday March 10, 2017

16998114_1440257079341097_2454253918191914373_n14 children from Mexico City and Portland, OR. played a two round match on Saturday, February 25, on KGS.  Mexico City won the match 8-4. “Our players are from two elementary schools in Mexico City,  Escuela de Arte Pipiolo and Colegio Serapio Rendón,” says team leader Siddhartha Avila.  Diego, 5 kyu, Bruno, 10 kyu, and Javier, 18 kyu all won both their games. Oliver, 23 kyu, won two games for Portland.  Portland and Mexico City have been playing one or more matches a year for the past several years. - Peter Freedman, Portland organizer.  Photos by Siddhartha Avila and Peter Freedman: The teams meet via Skype to set up the match.

Your Move/Readers Write: Go Clock Recommendations

Friday March 10, 2017

Leap PQ9903: “The MGA battled about this for about a year before finally settling on the Leap PQ9903,” writes Neil 2017.03.10_Leap PQ9903Ritter in response to the February 25 Your Move/Readers Write: Looking for go clocks posting, noting the clocks were more affordable through Alibaba compared to Amazon. It’s “perhaps important to note explicitly that this clock doesn’t do Canadian Byoyomi particularly well,” Neil adds. A thread summarizing the Massachusetts Go Association’s discussion on the topic can be found here.
 
DGT3000: “I believe the best game clock for the money is the DGT3000,” 2017.03.10_DGT3000suggests Dave Baran. “I am aware of three clocks that currently available that have both Japanese and Canadian byo-yomi:  the DGT3000, the Cronos, and the Duel Timer.” Dave notes that the Excalibur is an affordable option that might be available on EBay, but has been discontinued from production. Dave adds that, “the byo-yomi time control on the Zmartfun II chess clock is inadequate.”
 
Amazon.com: “You can get just about anything from Amazon.com,” points out Ralph Meyer, suggesting searching for “Chess Clocks”.
- Edited by Brian Kirby

AGA launches Master review series

Thursday March 9, 2017

The American Go Association has launched a new series of video commentaries on the recent games between between Master — the latest version of AlphaGo — and top professionals. The series on the AGA’s YouTube channel  features 2017.03.09_Master#1commentaries by Michael Redmond 9P, Jennie Shen 2P and Ryan Li 1P. Some two dozen videos are now in production and are expected to be released each Wednesday and Saturday.

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In the first commentary, Michael Redmond 9P and AGA E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock review the first game in the series, which took place in early January (Is AlphaGo the Master? Mystery Player Sweeps Top Pros and AlphaGo confirmed as Master/Magister, both  1/4/2017). In this game, Master plays white against Pan Tingyu 1P (username “manhan7″).

The series is produced by Andrew Jackson and Michael Wanek.

Go tourney blooms again in Santa Fe

Thursday March 9, 2017

On March 4th, the Santa Fe Go Club held its first AGA-rated tournament in several years. A mixed crowd and some interested 2017.03.09_santa-fe-IMG_5295watchers attended the Spring Go Tournament with 14 players from Santa Fe, Los Alamos and Albuquerque, NM.

As an experiment for the Santa Fe Go Club, the first round was paired as usual, followed by as many self-paired games that could be fitted in. The tournament was held at a private home with outdoor areas that were much enjoyed for game reviews in the beautiful, early spring weather.

Billy Maier won first place with Mario Espinoza a close second and Jonathan Zingale coming in third. Prizes were awarded to everyone. Robert Cordingley as the tournament director, ran the GoClubsOnLine software (goclubs.org) to pair, record games and determine winners. Many thanks go to Steve Uhl and Lew Geer for donating prizes and our additional sponsor and host Nancy Dahl.
- report/photo by Lewis Geer
Note, this post has been updated; the tournament was held March 4th, not May 4th.

Categories: U.S./North America
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Kim Seong-Jin edges out Pavol Lisy to win 2017 Irish Confucius Cup

Thursday March 9, 2017

The 2017 Irish Confucius Cup took place in Dublin on the weekend of March 4-5. It was the most diverse tournament ever in Ireland, with players coming from 15 different countries. It was also the strongest ever tournament held in Ireland, with 2 European professionals competing, and the top group bar set at 6d. 3 Chinese professionals were also in attendance to give commentaries: Guo Juan 5p (who was also sponsoring the event), Yu Ping 2p, and Chen Rui 5p. Taking first place in the 5-round event was Kim Seong-Jin 7d, who edged out second placed Pavol Lisy 1p by half a point in their round 3 encounter. On 3 wins and taking third place was Mateusz Surma 1p, edging out on tiebreak Csaba Mero 6d. Lower down the field, other players also had outstanding performances, for example Sona Smolarikova 3k picked up 5 wins out of . Players on 4 wins included Julien Renaud 2d, Alec Delogu 2d, Marianna Szychowiak 10k, and Colin Lafferty 13k. The tournament was directed and organised by Rory Wales, with a great deal of assistance and co-operation from the University College Dublin Confucius Institute. The final standings are published here and full details of the tournament and sponsors can be seen here.
- Ian Davis

Categories: Europe
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Redmond’s Reviews, Episode 2: Honinbo Dosaku 9P v. Kikukawa Yuseki 5P

Wednesday March 8, 2017

[link]

Episode 2: Honinbo Dosaku 9P v. Kikukawa is the latest in the new series of video commentaries with Michael Redmond 9P and Chris Garlock, Managing Editor of the American Go E-Journal.

In today’s commentary, Redmond and Garlock take a look at a 347-year-old game that not only features the move that 2017.03.08_Redmond's Reviews Episode 2Kobayashi Koichi 9P said changed his life, but includes moves that Master — the latest version of AlphaGo — played in its recent 60-win sweep of top professionals. Go history in the making!

Honinbo Dosaku (1645~1702) was by far the strongest player of his time, and is still considered to be one of the strongest players in go history. He made important contributions to go strategy for the opening, laying the foundations for the following golden period of progress for go.

Produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson

Categories: Redmond Reviews
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The Power Report: Iyama one win away from defending Kisei; Fujisawa Rina makes good start in Women’s Meijin challenge; Honinbo League

Monday March 6, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal2017.03.06_41kisei5_08

Iyama one win away from defending Kisei: The fifth game of the 41st Kisei title match was held at the Tokiwa Hotel in Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture, on March 1 and 2.  Playing black, Iyama forced a resignation after 165 moves. That took his score to 3-2, so he is just one win away from defending his title. The game was marked by fierce fighting throughout, so it became a competition in reading. In the end, Iyama brought down a big white group. Incidentally, the game showed the increasing influence of the AI program Master in two places in the opening. Both of the moves in question were played by Iyama, but, although it didn’t come out in this game, Kono is also said to have been strongly influenced by AI go. The sixth game will be played on March 9 & 10.

Fujisawa Rina makes good start in Women’s Meijin challenge: The first game of the 29th Women’s Meijin title match was played at the Arisu Pavilion at Heian Women’s University in Kyoto on March 1. Fujisawa Rina, the 18-2017.03.06_29fmeijin_05year-old holder of the Women’s Honinbo title, is challenging Xie Yimin, holder of the other four women’s titles. Xie has dominated women’s go in Japan for a decade and has picked up 26 titles in the process (more than twice as many as any other woman player). Fujisawa has won just three titles so far, but she has established herself as the number two woman player. The two have met twice in titles match (the 2016and 2015 Women’s Honinbo) and won one each. The Heian Women’s University includes go as a regular subject in its curriculum. It has now hosted the first game of this match for six years in a row and has also appointed Xie as a Guest Professor. Fujisawa drew black in the nigiri. In the middle game, the game seemed to tilt a little in Xie’s favor, but Fujisawa fought back and took the lead, so Xie resigned after move 217. Since this match is a best-of-three, starting with a win is a big advantage. Xie already faces a kadoban. The second game will be played on March 8.

Honinbo League
(March 1) Yamashita Keigo 9P (W) beat Yuki Satoshi 9P by 5.5 points; Ko Iso 8P (W) beat Hane Naoki 9P by resig. This loss cost Hane his share of the lead. Motoki Katsuya 7P has the provisional lead on 4-1; Hane and Ko follow him on 4-2.

Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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Go Spotting: Walter Mosley’s “Known to Evil”

Monday March 6, 2017

Fred Baldwin reports that “on p. 212 of one of Walter Mosley’s noir crime novels, Known to Evil  (2010) the detective Leonid2017.02.25_Walter Mosley’s Known to Evil McGill sums up the results of an online search. ‘Bug must have been serious about Zephyra because I received a long document from him, giving me all kinds of hitherto unrevealed information about Angie. She’d participated in a few long-distance runs of ten kilometers or more and worked for the Hillary campaign during the primaries. She played Go over the Internet and was pretty good at it, earning an emerald rating at a California club.’ I have no clue what an ‘emerald rating’ in go means,” says Baldwin, “but, hey, it was in California.”

Categories: Go Spotting
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