American Go E-Journal

2014 WAGC: 6 Players on Why They Love Go and How to Improve

Saturday July 5, 2014

Why top players love go is as varied as the players themselves, but they all pretty much agree that in order to get stronger, “you must love the game.” So said Japan’s Emura Kiko at a brief press conference on the opening day of this year’s World Amateur Go Championship, echoed by Malaysia’s Suzanne D’Bel Low, Korea’s Taewoong Wei, China’s Ruoran Wang, Vietnam’s Nhat Minh Vo and the Czech Republic’s Lukas Podpera, who were selected to answer questions at the press conference. “Go enables me to meet a lot of new friends, who become part of my family,” said Low. “Each game reveals my opponent’s style and personality,” added Podpera. At just 13, Vo is the youngest player at the WAGC, but already the game has enabled him to “meet a lot of interesting new people and travel around the world to share the go spirit,” he said. And while all the selected players said that lots of play and study is necessary to improve, Podpera was the most specific, noting that “In Europe we are failing at life and death (tsume-go) so that’s what we must study to improve.” Wei was even more succinct, saying that the three things necessary to get better at go are “Will, confidence and concentration.”
- Chris Garlock; photo by Ivan Vigano

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Friendship Match Launches 2014 World Amateur Championship in Korea

Saturday July 5, 2014

The 35th World Amateur Go Championship got underway Saturday morning in Gyeongju, Korea with the traditional Friendship Match between local go players and the WAGC players from around the world. Gathered in the main playing area on the first floor of the Hotel Hyundai, the WAGC players’ places were marked as usual by their nation’s flags and the locals eagerly joined them for a spirited round of friendly but intense matches. At the head of the room were pro Kim In 9P (at right in photo at lower left) playing a teaching game with a local luminary beneath the WAGC banner. Gyeongju City, along with the Republic of Korea, is hosting the WAGC in this scenic resort in the Bomun Lake resort area. In the back of the room, professional Hyun Wook Lee (at right in bottom right photo) played a 10-on-1 simul while Ms. Yun Jin Bae gave some three dozen avid youngsters a go lecture. After an opening ceremony and banquet on Saturday night, the tournament will begin Sunday and run through Wednesday, with games scheduled each morning and afternoon. The E-Journal and Ranka are teaming up again this year to provide full coverage of the WAGC, including updates on each round, player interviews, game commentaries, photos and final daily results at the end of each day.
- report/photos by Chris Garlock

Go Congress Hotel Rates, Late Fees Going Up July 15

Saturday July 5, 2014

July 15 is the deadline to reserve the lowest hotel prices for US Go Congress attendees at the Hotel Pennsylvania. “After July 15, we cannot guarantee room availability or prices, so you’d have to book rooms at the hotel’s normal rates instead of our special discounted rates,” says Congress Director Matthew Hershberger. “We’ve negotiated incredibly low rates with the Hotel Pennsylvania for go players, so don’t miss out!” Late fees for Congress registration will also go up after July 15. The US Go Congress runs August 9-17 in New York City.

Zhang Wins Happy Cup Youth Tourney

Thursday July 3, 2014

The annual Sunflower Happy Cup Youth Go Tournament, in Cupertino, drew 44 kids this year, reports organizer Wenguang Wang.  8th grader Wilson Zhang was the winner in group A with 4 wins.  “It was a super hot afternoon, which made the ice cream party at the end of the tournament very refreshing,” Wang told the Journal. The event was held June 8th, at the Sunflower Chinese School. More photos can be seen here.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Wenguang Wang.

Volunteers Wanted to Help Teach Go at DC Folk Life Festival

Wednesday July 2, 2014

Local organizers are looking for volunteers to help teach go at the final weekend of the Smithsonian’s Folk Life Festival on the National Mall in Washington, DC this Saturday and Sunday. Local players Julian Erville (left) and Juan Pablo Quizon were joined by fellow DC-area club members Todd Heidenreich, Ed Hsu, Sam Lee, Mike Pak, Yi Weng, Justin Teng, and John Goon last weekend “as they taught weiqi/go to some promising young talent,” says Goon, who coordinated the effort reaching more than 200 each day. China and Kenya are the centerpieces of the festival, which ends on Sunday. Contact John Goon at Spineyone@yahoo.com for details on how to volunteer.
-photo by John Goon

Categories: U.S./North America
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AGA Board Election Ballots Sent Out; Due Back August 8

Wednesday July 2, 2014

Ballots for the 2014 American Go Association Board elections have been sent to chapters and members, reports Arnold Eudell. “If you have not received your ballot and believe you should have, first check your spam folder,” Eudell says. “Then send a note to elections@usgo.org.” Note that only one ballot can be sent per email. If an email is duplicated, such as for a child’s membership, only one voting code will be sent. Contact the email address above with a unique email to receive all ballots. Also, comments sent through Ballot Bin are anonymous; if you want a response send comments to elections@usgo.org. Voting closes August 8.

 

Categories: U.S./North America
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Your Move/Readers Write: Impressive Ge; Looking for Spanish Go News

Wednesday July 2, 2014

Impressive Ge:  “7 Dan is impressive,” writes Chris Uzal about our profile of Canada’s Yongfei Ge (2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Americas & Oceania 6/29 EJ). “Playing go in the womb is even more impressive: ‘Yongfei Ge 7D is a 30-year-old software architect from Scarborough. He’s been playing for 30 years…’”
That would be impressive indeed! In fact, Ge is 45 and has been playing since he was 15.

Looking for Spanish Go News: Uzal also asks “Where can I find go news in Spanish? I work for a local Spanish newspaper. I have enough influence to get go stories published. I’d like to see more on the Latin American players.”
Send your tips on where to find go news in Spanish to us at journal@usgo.org and we’ll pass it along.

Sun Named AGHS President; Call for Officers

Monday June 30, 2014

Calvin Sun 1P has been selected as the new American Go Honor Society (AGHS) President. “I’m really glad to be the President for AGHS this year,” Sun told the Journal. “This has always been a goal for me because I feel like go has lost much of its popularity in the past couple of years in the United States, especially among kids. I wish to bring back the enthusiasm that children had for go when I first started the game. I am very excited for another year of hard work and fun.” The AGHS runs the popular School Teams Tourney, the Young Lions, and other youth events as well.  Outgoing Co-President Andrew Huang 6d issued a call to ” all young go players and enthusiasts who are interested in becoming  leaders in promoting and teaching go across the country. I encourage you to apply for an officer position. We will be led by Calvin Sun next year, but we still have openings for vice president, tournament organizer, treasurer, secretary, promotion head, and webmaster. We recommend that you only apply if you will be in high school next year. The application form can be found here. This is a great opportunity for you to serve the go community, and we look forward to reading your application.” -Story and photo by Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo: Calvin Sun 1P looks into the future.

 

 

2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Americas & Oceania

Sunday June 29, 2014

Last of a series of profiles of players in the 35th World Amateur Go Championships, which will be held July 4-11 in Gyeongju, Korea. Fifty-seven players from a like number of countries and territories are scheduled to make the trip to Korea to compete in the four-day, eight-round Swiss system. Many will be veterans of previous tournaments held in Japan and China, some drawn back to WAGC competition after a long absence, perhaps by the chance to be part of the first WAGC held in Korea. As usual, the largest contingent will come from Europe (30 players) and the youngest from the Far East (15 players, including an 11-year-old fromIndonesia). Click here for Ranka’s June 24 WAGC preview.

Americas
Argentina: Haroldo Brown 3k (right) is a 54-year-old development consultant from Buenos Aires. Career accomplishments Include “17 years of working with an outstanding humanitarian organisation (Oxfam) and at least 15 years in the theatre world.” His favorite thing about go is “The different paths one goes down in each game and, of course, the chance to meet people from many walks of life.” Hobbies include screenwriting. He’s not married, but says he “’adopted’ three daughters while I lived in Nicaragua.” He adds that “Go keeps my mind thinking strategically and this includes analysing with an open mind the different alternatives paths I can take in the face of whatever challenges come my way… And this has proved most useful in my development work as well as in the screenwriting world.”

Canada: Yongfei Ge 7D is a 45-year-old software architect from Scarborough. He’s been playing for 30 years, winning the Canada Open Championship in 2007, and the US Open Championship in 2001, 2007 and 2011. His favorite thing about go is to “Win after hard fight.” Hobbies include PC games, novels and running. Career highlights include the Horizontal Award, “signed by Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft.” He’s married, with one daughter.

Costa Rica: Enrique Boza Araya 7k is a 52-year-old systems engineer in San Jose. He’s been playing go for 11 years and says his favorite thing about the game is “The depth of the game despite its simple rules.” His hobbies include strategy games – he’s a 5-time champion at the Banco Central de Costa Rica’s annual tournament — writing fantasy stories, and movies.

Mexico: Ricardo Quintero Zazueta 5D is a 63-year-old mathematician and full time researcher at Cinvestav  in México City. He’s been playing go for more than 40 years and has been Mexican champion eight times. His favorite thing about go is “Making lasting friendships through go and the depth of the game itself.” His hobbies include Kendo. He’s married, with three children.

United States: Jie Liang 7D is a 43-year-old software engineer from Nashua, New Hampshire. Working with the same company for over 16 years, he says “I am doing well in the work so I have spare time to play go.” He’s been playing for 30 years, won 4th place in the 2010 KPMC and says his favorite things about go are “comfortable, brain game, concentration, competitive, friendship.” Hobbies include photography and fishing. He’s married, with “one 2-year old lovely boy, full of energy who likes placing stones on board in some patterns.” He adds that “I can still find great interest in playing go. Also I try to improve my games through online resources. There are some strong young players and Europeans are getting better too. I hope I will have better luck this time in the WAGC.”
Missing: Brazil (probably too busy with the World Cup!).

Oceania
Australia: Sang-Dae Hahn 7D is a retired professor who just turned 73 and lives in Sydney. He’s been playing go for 48 years, and is a 12-time Australian Champion (1978~1993) and won the 2012 Korean Ambassador’s Cup. His favorite thing about go is “creating my own aesthetic world” and his hobbies include “singing, traveling, and people.” Career highlights include teaching at Yon-sei Uni, Sydney Uni, Myongji Uni and 10 times Singing Recital. He’s married, with one child.
Missing: New Zealand

Africa: missing Madagascar & South Africa

Go Quiz: Three Firsts; Who’s Second?

Sunday June 29, 2014

Last week’s Quiz was inspired by EJ reader Vernon Leighton who thought he spotted an error in a May 13 Wired article on go. “It said that Michael Redmond (far right) was the first American go professional and that James Kerwin (near right) was the second. I believe that Kerwin was the first.” As the vast majority of respondents knew, Kerwin was indeed the first American pro, but the real answer is a bit more nuanced. The Wired article correctly said that “The charismatic Redmond, an American… remains the only Westerner to ever reach 9-dan, the game’s highest rank” and that  “James Kerwin…(became) the second-ever Western professional Go player” which is what created the confusion. Manfred Wimmer 2P (left) of Austria was the first Westerner to achieve professional status in 1978 at the Kansai Kiin; Kerwin 1P, from the United States, became a professional later that year at the Nihon Ki-in, the first westerner to do so there. Redmond was the first Western professional to achieve the rank of 9P, in 2000. Michael Goerss of Scottsdale, AZ is this week’s winner, chosen at random from those answering correctly.

This Week’s Quiz: Most of the registrants for the upcoming US Go Congress are from the United States; which country has the second-highest number of registrants? Click here to submit your answer. 

 

Categories: Go Quiz
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