American Go E-Journal

Maryland Open, Played Memorial Day Weekend, Rated Memorial Day Weekend

Tuesday May 26, 2015

The 42nd annual Maryland Open, which was played last Saturday and Sunday, was entered into the ratings system the next day and ratings2015.05.25_md-open-keith updated before the players returned to work Tuesday morning, report American Go Association staff.  “Our compliments to organizer Keith Arnold, TD Todd Heidenreich and the other volunteers who manage the event every year,” said AGA president Andy Okun.  “We received an error-free ratings report on Sunday night and quickly confirmed that all the players had memberships.  You can’t ask for better than that.  We should all take inspiration from their example.” photo: Arnold (right) at the MD Open; photo by Steve Colburn

 

Categories: U.S./North America
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EuroGoTV Update: Sweden, France, Russia, Romania, Turkey, Switzerland and Austria

Tuesday May 26, 2015

2015.05.25_FredrikSweden: The Swedish Championships 2015, played from 5/15-17 in Gothenburg, Sweden, were won by Fredrik Blomback 6d (left). Second came Charlie Aakerblom 5d and third was Yang Huang 5d. Result table.

France: In France several national championships took place in the commune of Cachan, in the weekend of 5/9-5/10.2015.05.25_French Under 16 final
The French Championships in the category of Under 12 was won by Lexiang Sun 7k. Second came Ismael Fathallah 11k and third was Thibault Morel 16k. Result table.
The French Championships – Under 16 – was won by Guillaume Ougier 1k who managed to beat his rival and big talent Isaac Scribe 3k in the thrilling finals by half a point. Third place was claimed by Leo Teychenne 7k. Result table. Photo: final game of Under 16 in France (left) Isaac Scribe, (right) Guillaume Ougier, with Toru Imamura Cornuejols 4d reviewing
2015.05.25_ArienneThe French Championships – Under 18 – was won by Ariane Ougier 1d (left), big sister of Guillaume. Second place was for Sylvain Bousquet 3k and on third place finished Julien Dartigues 6k. Result table.
The second stage of the Main French Championships were played a week later from 5/16-5/17 in the city of Orsay. The victor was Mathieu Daguenet 3d, with Julien Miralles 2d in second place and Stephan Kunne 1d trailing in third place. Result table.
Clearly investing in their youth players, the French also recently organised the Pau Youth Tournament, played on the 17th of May in Pau. It was won by Kim Schott Dedieu 15k. Second came Jade Rindlisbacher 20k and third was Axel Chadeau 20k. Result table.

Russia: Another country that has recently been organising many local youth tournaments.
On the 16th of May the third stage of the Youth Moscow Grand Prix took place in Moscow. 36 youngsters competed in the tournament, which was won by Anatolij Khokhlov 12k, with Roman Kolgushkin 14k in second place and Ivan Afanasjev 17k in third place. Result table. In the city of Tolyatti, the Cup of Tolyatti took place on the 17th of May. It was won by Robert Gorbunov 5k. Second came Nikita Semenov 9k and Nikita Allin 6k was third. Result table. The Children’s Group of the same tournament had sixteen kids fighting for the crown. Ivan Peshkov 10k came out as the winner, with Stanislav Arefjev 15k as second best and Alexandr Gurevich 15k in third place. Result table.
The Championships of the Crimean Federal District, played from 5/15-5/17 in Simferopol, was won by Gleb Kajro 1k. Second came Demjan Zavgorodnij 2k and third was Nikolaj Zareckij 3k. Result table.

Romania: The 6th Radu Baciu Grand Prix – stage 3, played from 5/16-5/17 in Bistrita, Romania, was won by Viorel Arsinoaia 2d. Second came George Ginguta 2d and third was Adrian Nedan 1k. Result table.

Turkey: Turkey has been rapidly developing as a go country over the past few years, with more and more tournaments seeing the light of day and a big group of students playing the game. The 10th Hacettepe Tournament, played from 5/16-5/17 in Ankara, Turkey, had a total of 76 participants. The best of them all was Engin Serkan Solmazoglu 1d who won all his games. Second place was claimed by Fatih Sulak 2d and third was Ilyas Tanguler 1d. Result table.

Switzerland: The Veyrier-Ko Go Club Tournament, played from 5/16-5/17 in Club de Bridge des Bergues (CBB), Switzerland, was won by Chunyang Xiao 2d. Second came Semi Lee 2d and third was Longteng Chen 2d. Result table.

Austria: The Go7 Samstagsturnier, played on Sunday the 16th of May 16-05-2015 in Vienna, Austria, had professional player Baolong Zhao competing as well as top Austrian player Lothar Spiegel 5d. As is often the case with handicap games, it does not mean that the strongest players automatically win. The tournament was won by Christian Bernscherer 5k who used his handicap stones to their maximum efficiency, with Alexander Huber 8k in second place and Lisa Mayer 3k in third place. Result table.
- Kim Ouweleen, European Correspondent for the E-Journal, based on reports from EuroGoTV

Categories: Europe
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Mexico Bests Portland in School Match

Tuesday May 26, 2015

DSC_0092Mexico City triumphed over Portland, OR in a friendly children’s tourney held May 16th on KGS, reports organizer Peter Freedman. Each city fielded a team of six children, ranked from 10-21k. They participated in a three-round tournament using 19×19 boards and KGS handicaps. “Luke Helprin’s parents hosted the Portland team at their house, and his dad Ted graciously provided snacks and helped with Spanish,” said Freedman.  Portland got off to a good start in round one by winning 4 out of 6 games.  Round two was a tie with each team winning 3 matches, setting the stage for a decisive showdown.  In the third round, Mexico City came up from behind by winning 5 out of 6 matches. -Austin Freeman with Paul Barchilon.  Photo by Siddhartha Avila: Members of the Mexican team Skyping with Portland.  

Winners Report: Overall Wins: Mexico 10, Portland 8; 3 game winner: Luke Helprin 20k; 2 game winners: Hikaru Saito 10k, Diego Ali Manjarrez 14k, Leonardo Valdovinos 14k, Daniela Luciano 22k, Almudena Espinosa 21k.

 

Go Classified: Go World Mags for Sale

Tuesday May 26, 2015

 

Nearly Complete Set of Go World Magazine For Sale: All issues of Go World, except #13 and #23.  #5 is missing its cover and #129 (last issue) is still in the unopened envelope as mailed from Japan.  There are also some extras that could be used to trade. Conditions are generally near perfect, though some of the earlier ones show some wear.  Will entertain offers (including, perhaps, donation to a non-profit of some sort). Located in western Colorado, could possibly be delivered to Denver area. Fairly heavy (roughly 45lbs) so shipping will be somewhat pricey. Contact jake@edge2.net for more information.
Go classifieds are free; send yours to journal@usgo.org

Categories: Go Classified
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The Power Report: Lead changes in 40th Meijin League; Kisei S League starts; Cho U moves to Taiwan; Yamashita to challenge Iyama Gosei

Monday May 25, 2015

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal

Lead changes in 40th Meijin League: A game in the 40th Meijin League was played on a Monday, May 4, instead of the usual Thursday.2015.05.25-Kono-Rin Cho U 9P (B) beat Murakawa Daisuke Oza by 2.5 points, thus scoring what was only his second win in five games. Murakawa dropped to 3-3 and will probably have to focus on keeping his league place rather than on becoming the challenger. An important game was played on May 7 between the two players who were close on the heels of the provisional leader of the league, Ko Iso 8P. Kono Rin 9P (B) beat Yamashita Keigo 9P by resig. Kono (right) improved his score to 4-1 and shares the lead with Ko. Yamashita dropped to 3-2. On May 21, Takao (W) beat Ko Iso by resig. This completed the sixth round. The lead is now shared by Kono and Takao, who are both on 4-1. For the first time since the league began, Ko Iso has dropped out the lead or a share of it, but on 4-2 he is well placed if the above two falter; he hasn’t played either of them yet, so he doesn’t have to rely on other players to drag them down. Yamashita is next on 3-2.

Kisei S League starts: The S League is at the top of the pyramid of five leagues in the revamped Kisei tournament, and its winner has the 2015.05.25-murakawabest chance of becoming the Kisei challenger, as he gets a seat in the play-off and an automatic one-game lead as well. The first two games were played on May 7. Murakawa Daisuke Oza (left) started the week badly (see Meijin League report above), but did better here. Playing white, he beat Takao Shinji by 4.5 points. In the other game, Yoda Norimoto 9P (B) beat Kobayashi Satoru 9P by resig. The other players in the six-man league are Yamashita Keigo and Yamashiro Hiroshi. I was planning to report in detail only on the S League, but there was an interesting game in the A League on the 4th. Veteran player Kono Rin 9P (W) beat the up-and-coming new star Ichiriki Ryo 7P by resignation. On 2-0, Kono shares the lead in the eight-player A League with Cho Riyu 8P.

Cho U moves to Taiwan: Cho U 9P has revealed that he is moving to his homeland of Taiwan this 2015.05.25-Cho-Umonth, though he will remain a member of the Nihon Ki-in and keep playing in Japanese tournaments. The reason is his dissatisfaction with his results in recent years; he is hoping that a change in environment will bring about an improvement in his play. Many top players have come to Japan from Taiwan (Rin Kaiho, O Rissei, and O Meien, just to mention three), but this is the first time a top player has taken the reverse course. Cho is 35, an age at which even a top player usually sees a falling off in his results, but Cho is obviously not prepared to accept this. His inspiration may be Cho Chikun, who won his second triple crown (Kisei, Meijin, and Honinbo) at the age of 40. Cho U came to Japan at the age of ten and in 2009 became the first player to hold five top-seven titles simultaneously. He has seats in the top three leagues (though in the A League in the 40th Kisei, not the top S League), but he hasn’t won a title since losing the Kisei title in 2013. In an interview in the Yomiuri Newspaper, he said: ‘I can’t show [go fans] games of which I am ashamed. I think that changing my environment will have a positive effect on my go.’ A brief news item in Go Weekly stated that Kobayashi Izumi was taking a break from tournament play after her game on May 14 so that her children could study  in Taiwan. Cho’s desire to see his children master Chinese is obviously an additional motive for moving back to Taiwan. It’s a bit unfortunate that Kobayashi Izumi (aged 37), who just made a comeback to active play last year, once again has to sacrifice her own career for her family.

2015.05.25-yamashitaYamashita to challenge Iyama Gosei: Yamashita Keigo is doing his level best to make a breach in Iyama’s quadruple-crown citadel. In the play-off to decide the challenger for the 40th Gosei title, held at the Nihon Ki-in in Ichigaya, Tokyo on May 18, Yamashita (W) beat Kono Rin 9P by resignation. The game lasted 194 moves. Yamashita has won the Gosei title once, way back in 2000 (the 20th Gosei); in 2008 he unsuccessfully challenged Cho U, losing 1-3. This will be the third title match this year between Yamashita and Iyama; it is only the third time two players have played three top-seven matches against each other in the same year. Moreover, the Gosei is only the fourth title match of the year, so the two could well set a new record (Yamashita is still in the running to become the challenger in the Meijin and Tengen tournaments). The first game of the title match will be played on June 26.

Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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Women’s Go Training League Launched

Monday May 25, 2015

The Celerity Go League is a brand-new women’s go training league hosted on the KGS Go Server . Founder Peggy Yang had “a light-bulb 2015.05.25_celerity-league-peggyandwhitneymoment” at the recent San Diego Go Championship when it occurred to her that female go players “should all get together to play more games, encourage each other, and spend more time together!” On the first of each month, members will be paired together, encouraged to study go and assigned a mentor teacher for that month. Members and teachers will then gather together at the end of the month to discuss their methods of study, share what they have learned, and talk about how to grow further. Membership is free and female players of all ranks are welcome. “Let’s all have fun and improve together!” says Yang. Celerity, by the way, means “swiftness of movement.” Find the club under Social Rooms on KGS and on Facebook.
photo: Yang (left), with her friend Whitney Cotter 25k

Categories: U.S./North America
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John F. Nash Jr., Math Genius Defined by a ‘Beautiful Mind,’ Dies at 86

Sunday May 24, 2015

John F. Nash Jr., a mathematician who shared a Nobel Prize in 1994 for work that greatly extended the reach and power of modern economic 2015.05.24_25NASH1-obit-master675theory and whose long descent into severe mental illness and eventual recovery were the subject of a book and a film, both titled “A Beautiful Mind,” was killed, along with his wife, in a car crash on Saturday in New Jersey. He was 86.

2015.05.24_beautiful_mind-movieDr. Nash was widely regarded as one of the great mathematicians of the 20th century, known for the originality of his thinking and for his fearlessness in wrestling down problems so difficult few others dared tackle them.

He invented a game, known as Nash, that became an obsession in the Fine Hall common room at Princeton, where he also played go. He also took on a problem left unsolved by Dr. von Neumann and Oskar Morgenstern, the pioneers of game theory, in their now-classic book, “Theory of Games and Economic Behavior.”
Adapted from Erica Good’s obituary in The New York Times. photo (right): John F. Nash Jr. at his Princeton graduation in 1950, when he received his doctorate; (left) Russell Crowe, as Nash, playing go in the 2001 film “A Beautiful Mind”

Categories: U.S./North America
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Eric Lui Wins Maryland Open

Sunday May 24, 2015

Eric Lui topped a field of 58 players to win the Maryland Open on Memorial Day weekend in Baltimore. Keith Arnold was the event organizer 2015.05.25_md-openand the Tournament Director was Todd Heidenreich. photos by Steve Colburn

2015.05.25_md-open-keithOpen Section
First: Eric Lui 7 dan; 
Second:  Zhaonian Chen 7 dan; Third: Andrew Huang 7 dan; Fourth: Ricky Zhao 7 dan
A Section: First: Michelle Zhang 5 dan; Second  Jacky Chong 4 dan
B Section: First: Eric Lee 3 dan; Second: Victor Kang 3 dan
C Section: First: David Edgar 2 dan; Second  Frederick Bao 1 dan
D Section: First: Isaac Wiener  3 kyu – Kyu Champion; Second: Jeremy Young 4 kyu
E Section: First: Kyle Cutler 6 kyu; Second:  Bob Crites 7 kyu
F Section: First: Antonina Perez-Lopez 21 kyu (undefeated); Second: Sarah Crites 13 kyu; Third: Jin Wu 10 kyu; Fourth: Kilin Tang 11 kyu
Fighting Spirit Prize – Laurie Ensworth  17 kyu
Gregory Lefler Prize – Feng Yun Go School ( 9 players)

Categories: U.S./North America
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The Power Report: Globis Cup Final Commentary, Huang vs. Na

Sunday May 24, 2015

2nd Globis Cup final: Huang vs. Na
White: Huang Yunsong 3P (China)
Black: Na Hyun 6P (Korea)
Played on May 10, 2015
See: The Power Report: Huang of China Wins Globis Cup 5/10 EJ
Click here for the SGF.

Venue: Graduate School of Management, Globis University
Commentary by O Meien 9P, translated by John Power, Japan E-Journal correspondent

It was no surprise that Na Hyun made the final of this tournament for players under 20, as he is one of the top young players in Korea. Among the Chinese players, one might have expected Yang Dingshin, rated 18th in the world, or Li Qincheng, who won the CCTV Cup, a TV tournament like Japan’s NHK Cup, last year, but Huang proved to be a dark horse. Actually, at 18 he is two years older than the other two Chinese representatives, so you could say he pulled rank.

The following commentary is an amplified version of the report in Go Weekly of the public commentary conducted by O Meien, with Mannami Nao 3P acting as his assistant.

The opening, with Black ignoring 8 to switch to the approach move of 9, is very popular these days. There are many examples of it from actual2015.05.24_globis-1-49 play. The same opening appeared in the play-off for third place.
        O: “In the old days, Black would have captured 16 instead of playing 21, but now this is the mainstream move. I don’t know which is better . . .” Formerly the moves to 21 were like a set opening, but now you often see the pattern to 25. The amount of research that has been carried out on this opening in China and Korea is incalculable. “But I don’t play it as White. I can’t understand why White burrows into the [top right] corner. Actually, this result gives a good contest, so probably my feel for go is out of whack.’ [Laughter from the audience]
        The two-space jump to 29 is also common. The hane of White 32 is also a vital point. O, on seeing Black 33: “This is a strong, calm move.” Instead of 33, you are tempted to play at A, but White has the attachment of B, so perhaps Black thinks this territory won’t amount to much. After gazing at 33 for a while, O expressed admiration. “I get it. He’s strong.”
        White 36. White thinks that the exchange for 37 will make 36 a forcing move when he attaches across the knight’s move with C.
Black 39 and 40 seem to be the par moves. O: “According to my feel for go, 3
9 should be at D. Na’s assessment is that the exchange for 40 makes 39 a forcing move rather than a bad move.”
        When Black expands the bottom with 41, White attacks inside by attaching at 42. The move at 21 leaves White with scope to play this move. O: “That’s why capturing the ladder stone is best.”
 2015.05.24_globis-dia-1       Black responds by solidifying his side territory with 43 on. If instead Black hanes on top with 1 in Dia. 1 (left), White plays 2 and 4, then slides to 6; this will be more than Black can handle. After the game, Huang rapidly laid out the continuation to 19 and said that this was not bad for White. Huang: “I’ve finished researching the attachment of 43. I have confidence in the local variations.”2015.05.24_globis-50-99
       White 54 is a good, calm move. O: “Moves like this reflect the player’s experience. “ At first, O had thought that the result to 52 was not interesting for White, but he started to revise his opinion on seeing 54 on the grounds that Huang was obviously satisfied and we could rely on his perception.
        White 60 is another calm move. Having played a forcing sequence on the right side, White believes that this is good enough. O commented at first that he couldn’t play 60, but White 62 convinced him that Huang knew what he was doing. It turned out later that both the players agreed that the game was good for White at this point. That’s why Black plays 61: he has to harass White’s sole weak group to get back into the game.
        When White ignores 61, 63 looks like the natural follow-up, but the players agreed later that attaching at 65 instead would have made the game more difficult. White’s solid extension of 64 works well. O: “This may have been the decisive point of the game.” That’s not to say that’s it’s a won game for White by any means, but he has an edge.
        Black 77, forestalling White E, is big, but so is White 78.
  2015.05.24_globis-100-112      Black 79 is an all-out move that clearly shows that Black feels he is behind. O commented that it may have been an overplay. It immediately struck O as being too deep.
        White 84. If White answers the peep at 90, Black intends to push down with 84, so countering with 84 is natural.
        The cut of White 92 is a good move. If Black answers at 97, White has the threat of F, so Black goes all out with 93.
        Black 99 extricates the center stones. If White cuts at 103, Black cuts at 102 and at this point Black is ahead in the capturing race. When White plays 100, however, Black has no choice but to reinforce at 103.
        White 112 is the knock-out punch: it makes miai of G and H, so Black has to resign.
        Huang: “There was a lot of pressure, but [winning] feels good. Next, I want to win a bigger international tournament.”
        Na: “I lost without being able to do a thing. I have regrets.”
        During his commentary, O commented that the strength of the top young Chinese and Korean players came from a mixture of reading ability and perception.
Incidentally, the day of the final was the first day that Huang wore a jacket instead of just a jersey. O commented that in China go is regarded as a sport, so the young players all wear jerseys. Often their training camps are held at the same venues as soccer training camps, so the players would feel funny if they dressed differently. O joked that they switch to suits when they turn 30. During this tournament, Ichiriki and the other Japanese representatives were turned out in natty suits and ties. One advantage of the Japanese system that struck me, however, is that the Japanese players are “socialized” earlier than the Chinese players. It was hard to get a word out of the Chinese teenagers in interviews, but the Japanese teenagers were already adept at public speaking. During the reception on the Thursday, Mannami called them up on to the stage at different times for mini “talk shows” TV-style and they all acquitted themselves well.
Mannami had an interesting comment about Korean players. She visited Korea to study go not long ago, and she said she was surprised by the way the young players chatted with each other until the start of the game. In Japan the players psych themselves up before the game, so there’s no chatting; the contest begins as soon as the players take their seats. (She used the sumo term “shikiri,” which refers to the long face-off before a bout begins.)

“Divine Move” Comes to Netflix

Sunday May 24, 2015

“The Divine Move,” last year’s Korean action movie about go (Korean Action Go Movie Opens in US & Canada  7/23/2014 EJ), is now on Netflix 2015.05.24_divine-moveunder its Korean name, Sin-ui Hansu, reports Matthew Hershberger. Click here.

 

Categories: U.S./North America
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