American Go E-Journal

Free Teaching Workshop with Yang Yu Chia Dec. 15

Wednesday December 5, 2012

Yang Yu Chia, general secretary of the Ing Chang Ki Goe Foundation, will introduce his innovative method of teaching go to children and beginners on Saturday Dec. 15, 2012 at the American Ing Goe Center in Menlo Park, CA. Yang has years of experience with teaching kids, and organizes and supervises the World Youth Go Championships every year. The seminar is free and open to anyone teaching or interested in teaching go, and begins at 2:00 pm.  The American Ing Goe Center is at 887 Oak Grove Avenue in Menlo Park, CA.

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US Youth Championship Jan. 19

Tuesday December 4, 2012

The United States Youth Go Championships will be held Saturday, January 19th, on KGS.   The tourney will determine National Dan, Single Digit Kyu (SDK), and Double Digit Kyu (DDK) Champions. The winners will receive trophies, and prizes will be awarded in the following brackets: 5-7 dan 1-4 dan, 1-4 kyu, 5-9 kyu, 10-15 kyu, 16-20 kyu, 21-25 kyu, 26 -30 kyu (depending on number of registrants).  The qualifiers will use several formats for pairing, and all dan level youth will compete in an open section.  The top four eligible youth will then move on to a double elimination final held on January 20th, and continuing the following weekend. Contestants will also be entered into a pool to receive partial scholarships to either the AGA Summer Youth Go Camp, or the US Go Congress, courtesy of the AGF, 16 Scholarships will be awarded.

The Junior Division is for youth under 12, the Senior Division is for youth under 16 as of August 15, 2013.  Only US Citizens under 16 may enter the finals, youth who are under 18 may compete in the qualifiers and kyu brackets, and so may residents who are not citizens.  To register, e-mail youth@usgo.org with your name, AGA #, date of birth, AGA rating, KGS ID, and citizenship.  You may enter at a rank higher than your official AGA rank, but may not enter at a lower one.  The registration deadline is Sunday, January 13th.  For more info, see the USYGC page. -Paul Barchilon E-J Youth Editor.  Photo: USYGC Sr. Division Champion Calvin Sun 7d, (at left) competing against Alexandru-Petre Pitrop, of Romaniam at the 2012 World Youth Go Championships, in Luoyang, China.  Photo by Abby Zhang.

Kevin Zhou 5D Tops Chi Tourney

Monday December 3, 2012

Basking in the spring-like weather, 29 go players battled all day at the December 1 Entertainment for Menschen tournament in Chicago, IL. “It was so nice out that Shanthanu Bhardwaj 8k bicycled 37 miles to get there,” reports TD Bob Barber. Until Saturday, Zihang Yin had been undefeated in AGA play, and despite finally losing a game, the 8-year old Yin “was gracious enough to invite us all to join him at Legoland,” Barber says. “After some discussion, we opted for pizza and beer.”

Winner’s Report: 1st Place Dan:  ZHOU, Kevin, 5d (front right, in white shirt); 1st Place High Kyu:  RUBENSTEIN, Mark, 4k; 1st Place Mid Kyu:  BOYLAND, Peter, 7k; 1st Place Low Kyu:  TORRES, Tim, 15k.  photo by Mark Rubenstein; click here to see more tourney photos.

Categories: U.S./North America
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China Holds Slight Edge in Nongshim Cup

Monday December 3, 2012

In the knockout battle of the 14th Nongshim Cup, the second round — held November 26-30 – saw all of the remaining Japanese players eliminated, leaving the two remaining Korean players and three Chinese rivals to battle it out for the title.

The two players left for Korea are Choi Cheolhan 9P (left) and 19-year-old sensation Park Junghwan 9P, while China still has Jiang Weije 9P, Xie He 9P, and Chen Yaoye 9P – providing just the kinds of matchups China wants going into the final. Chen is 9-1 all time against Choi and Xie also holds a winning record against him. In general, the solid, patient style of play favored by the two Chinese pros performs well against the Korean fighting style of Choi and Park.

It was a topsy-turvy second round, where Lee Hobum 3P (who stopped Tan Xiao’s 3-win streak in the first round) lost to Japan’s Fujita Akihiko 3P. Fujita, however, lost to China’s Wang Xi 9P in his next game. Wang went on to defeat Kim Jiseok and Anzai Nobuaki before losing to Korea’s Choi Cheolhan 9P.

Choi snuffed out Japan’s last hope by defeating their final player – Murakawa Daisuke 7P. The final round will begin February 26, 2013

The Nongshim Cup is a team event between China, Japan and Korea. The sponsor, Nongshim, is a Korean instant noodles company. The tournament uses a win and continue format, which is common in these team events. Korea has dominated this event, winning it 10 times. In contrast, China has won the tournament twice and Japan only once.

Adapted from a report on Go Game Guru; click here for game records and more information. Edited by Ben Williams

 

Categories: World
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Your Move/Readers Write: Go World Index Update

Monday December 3, 2012

“Thanks for mentioning the Go World Index (“My Favorite Go World Story” Contest Announced 11/26 EJ)” writes Jochen Fassbender.As the GW indexer I’d like to call your attention to the fact that GWI is updated till #125, not #122, with some of the material in later issues already indexed. Users may also want to check out the GWI broad terms page which allows a hierarchical top-down approach to finding one’s favorite articles. And there is an updated cumulative table of contents through #128. It will be interesting to see which articles may be the top favorite ones in the “My Favorite Go World Story” Contest, especially because there are many dozens of excellent articles. Also, many gems of early GW issues may not be known today.”

Go Art: Romantic Go Video

Monday December 3, 2012

While researching our recent story on go in Brazil (New Sao Paolo Go Club Opens with Style 11/25/2012 EJ), we came across a terrific romantic French go video, The Album Leaf Within Dreams, posted on Insei Brazil’s website. The wordless 6:36 minute video, made by Pierre Bellanger (DJPeter 3d KGS) for a class at the University of Montpellier Paul Valéry in France, beautifully shows the seductiveness of the game of go through the attraction of a soccer-playing boy to a studious female go player. Be sure to watch it all the way through to a perfect ending that could have been scripted by Nakayama Noriyuki.

Categories: Go Art,Go Spotting
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Finding the Move: Remembering Go World

Sunday December 2, 2012

By Keith Arnold
In a time when Newsweek cannot make a “go” of it as a print publication, it is hardly surprising to see the end of Go World. Still, a visceral sentimental sadness is hard to shake. Those of us who go back to the days of Go Review, or at least the pre-internet years, will doubtless find this passing much more of a milestone than younger folk. In the not-so-distant days when there were just a few new books a year, the quarterly arrival of Go World filled my weekend mornings as I carefully reviewed title matches and eagerly devoured the months-old ‘news,’ stale perhaps but as fresh as an English speaker could get at the time.

So it’s hard for me to choose just one favorite Go World story (“My Favorite Go World Story” Contest Announced 11/26 EJ) from a magazine that was such a constant companion, in the car, in my briefcase, consulted whenever life lulled.  But one of my favorite moments as a go player is Go World related, although, luddite that I am, I must confess it occurred using “Go World on Disc” and not the paper version.

I was reviewing a game of Shuko’s (still my favorite player) at home on the computer.  I was a keen, improving player at the time, and even if I might be stronger now, I am not sure I am as sharp.  The program allowed you to guess the next move by clicking on an empty intersection – if you were correct, the move would appear, along with any comment from the magazine on that particular move. It was Shuko’s play in a complex fight and I stared at the board, trying to find a way for my hero to win. I read for some time, finally made my decision, and clicked on the spot. Nothing. I looked again. I still liked my move, so, stubbornly, I clicked again on the same spot. Still nothing.

Usually when this happened I would try other moves, with increasingly lazy speed till I happened on the right move or gave up in frustration. But this time I just stared at the screen and finally hit the key for the next move. With the digital stone, a comment appeared. “Shuko regretted this move.  He should have played at ‘a’” which was…my move!  I will never forget jumping up and down with excitement at finding the right move when the pro had not. And it was not even one of Shuko’s famous blunders. I was thrilled.

Don’t get me wrong, I was and am still a weak go player, and this is the only time that I, like a duffer golfer whose one good drive keeps him coming back, can ever recall doing this. Thank you Go World for all the pleasure you have given us over the years, and for that one glorious moment that made them all sweeter.

Arnold runs one of the oldest chapters in the American Go Association, the Gilbert W. Rosenthal Memorial Baltimore Go Club, which has sponsored the Maryland Open go tournament every Memorial Day weekend for 39 years.

New SportAccord World Mind Games Website Launched

Thursday November 29, 2012

The SportAccord World Mind Games website has a new and updated design, with a number of useful options to improve user’s experience. Visitors can access the latest news about the upcoming event, results, schedule, players’ biographies, and photos, and the website will also have an option to be read in two languages; English or Chinese. During the event – which runs December 12-19 in Beijing — live broadcast coverage will be available through the website as well. The SportAccord World Mind Games are a multi-sports event which highlights the value of mind sports, including go, bridge, draughts, and Chinese chess, featuring the world’s best players delivering top-level performances and creating “new valuable experiences based on intelligence, strategy and exercise of mind,” says SportAccord, the umbrella organisation for 107 international sports federations and organisations.

EuroGoTV Update November 27-23

Thursday November 29, 2012

Coventry 2012: The Coventry, played on 11/24 in Warwick University, United Kingdom, was won by Andrew Simons 3d, in second was Siu Fung Cheung 4d and third was Francis Roads 1d… Hungarian Championship Final: The Hungarian Championship Final, played 11/24-25 in Budapest, Hungary, was won by Csaba Mero 6d, second was Pal Balogh 6d and third place was Dominik Boviz 2d… Lithuanian Go Championship 2012: The Lithuanian Go championship 2012, played from 11/23-25 in Vilnius, Lithuania, was won by Giedrius Tumelis 2d, second place was Andrius Petrauskas 3d and third was Paulius Almintas 1d… Go Baron Qualification: The Go Baron Qualification, played from 11/23-25 in Praha, Czech Republic, was won by Ondrej Silt 6d, second was Jan Hora 6d and third was Jan Simara 6d… Turniej w Warsztacie: The Turniej w Warsztacie, played on 11/25 in Warszawa, Poland, was won by Bartosz Klimczak 3k, in second was Pawel Fraczak 4k and third was Jan Fraczak 5k… Welticke Wins Berliner Kranich: Despite losing in Round 3, German Youth Champion Jonas Welticke 4d (at left) won the 2012 Berliner Kranich, played from 11/24-25 in Berlin, Germany; in second was Bernd Schuetze 4d and third was Johannes Obenaus 5d (see EuroGoTV for sgfs)Berliner Meisterschaft/Endrunde: The Berliner Meisterschaft/Endrunde, played on 11/23 in Berlin, Germany, was won by Johannes Obenaus 5d, second was Ronny Treysse 3d… Russian Championship, Final: The Russian Championship Final, played from 11/21-25 in Sankt-Peterburg, Russia, was won by Ilja Shikshin 7d, in second was Dmitriji Surin 6d and third was Alexandr Dinerstein 7d… Welticke Wins Berliner Kranich: Despite losing in Round 3, German Youth Champion Jonas Welticke 4d won the 2012 Berliner Kranich (sgfs of all games available at EuroGoTV)… Berlin Championship 2012 Final: Johannes Obenaus 5d (at right) successfully defended his title against Ronny TreyBe 3d on 11/23. Obenaus was the first to enter byo-yomi, but was winning on the board when TreyBe lost on time. Both video and sgf of the match can be found on EuroGoTV.
- adapted from EuroGoTV, which includes winner reports, crosstabs, game records and photos. Edited by Taylor Litteral

Categories: Europe
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Li Wins Young Lions Tourney, Again

Wednesday November 28, 2012

Fifteen-year-old Yunxuan Li 5d once again led the pack of youth go players, with a convincing 4-0 record,  in the annual Young Lions Tournament, held November 17th on KGS. “The final round of the tournament, with Li facing off against USYGC Champion Aaron Ye 5d, was especially breathtaking, with Li playing an exquisite tesuji combo while under time pressure to save his group from death and clinch the game,” reports tourney organizer Hugh Zhang 7d. The tournament, hosted by the American Go Honors Society (AGHS), is one of the premier youth competitions in the US. “I think the AGHS did a great job with this tournament,” Li comments, “they kept the tournament organized and fun,  and made a good opportunity to play against youth players in America.” Li, as well as second place finishers Aaron Ye and Eric Su 4d, will receive as one of their prizes a free teaching game from newly minted go professionals Andy Liu 1P and Gansheng Shi 1P. Willis Huang 1d, another strong contender in the open division added that “I think the Young Lion’s Tourney was intriguing. It shows the potential younger players [like me] have.” Winners of the Young Lions tournament usually go on to do extremely well in the United States Youth Go Championship. Vincent Zhuang 6d, the 2011 winner went on to win the USYGC, while last year Yunxuan Li nearly made the finals. This year, Li is one of the top contenders and has a strong chance of winning the USYGC and representing the US at the world championships. The American Go Honors Society also hosts the School Team Tournament, in which schools each send teams of at least three players, and fight for the title of North America’s strongest school, more info here. - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor, with Hugh Zhang. Photo: A crowd gathers to watch Yunxuan Li 5d, at left, in a match with Yoo Changhyuk 9P, at right, at a simul in LA last April.  Photo by Wenguang Wu.