American Go E-Journal

Hwang In-seong Extends Internet Go School to the Americas

Wednesday December 18, 2013

Hwang In-seong 8d, currently the number-one rated player in Europe, has introduced American hours to his Yunguseng internet go school, previously only conveniently available to Europeans. The fully-online format comprises three elements: live, interactive video lectures, student-student games played on KGS in graded leagues and reviews of all these games. It runs in three-month seasons, during which students can interact by text with nine live video lectures which start at 9p Central Time (CT) . They will also play five league games per month on prearranged dates, starting at 8p CT. Students may move up and down between leagues each month, depending on their game results. The games are then reviewed at 10p the same evening. In addition, students can view recordings of all lectures and game reviews, past and present, including those of their European counterparts. The new season starts on January 6, 2014 and is enrolling students now. The cost is $130 per month, or $330 for the full season, $570 for two. There are special rates for spectator-only membership and scholarships are available for under-26s with no regular income. Click here for full details and the chance to view three sample videos free of charge.
Report by Tony Collman, British correspondent for the E-Journal.

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2013 SportAccord World Mind Games Overview: Reports, Photos, Games & Commentaries

Wednesday December 18, 2013

The American Go E-Journal collaborated with Ranka Online and SportAccord to again provide comprehensive coverage of the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG), held December 12-18 in Beijing, China. The team included American Go E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock, Ranka Online Editor Ivan Vigano, James Davies, John Richardson, Yuki Shigeno and Michael Redmond 9P. See below for a selection of highlights of the E-Journal coverage, or click here for all of Ranka’s reports.  

Korea Men’s Team & Zhiying Yu Win Gold in World Mind Games

Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 5 (finals) and Women’s Individual Round 7 (final).

China Wins World Mind Games Pair Go Tournament; Meeting the Masters; Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun?
Includes game records/commentaries for Pair Go rounds 1-3.

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 4
: China & Korea Sweep to Final Showdown in Men’s Team Tourney; Wang Chenxing & Yu Zhiying in All-China Women’s Individual Final; Redmond Audio Game Commentaries
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 4 and Women’s Individual Rounds 5 & 6. 

Ranka SAWMG Highlights: Japan’s National Team; Interview with Park Jieun; The Red-Faced King; Designing a Tournament with Martin Stiassny

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 3 (Saturday, December 14): Wang Chenxing Clinches Medal in Women’s Individual Tourney; China & Korea Continue to Steamroll Men’s Teams, North America Blanked Again; Benjamin Teuber on Playing Michael Redmond 9P and Studying in China; Draughted In: Why Zhao Hanqing Changed Games; Going to the Max
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 3 and Women’s Individual Round 4.

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 2 (Friday, December 13): North America & Japan’s Men’s Teams Winless as China-Korea Final Looms; All-China Final in Women’s Individual; PLUS: Svetlana Shikshina 3P Moves to Canada; What We Can Learn from Chess & Japan’s Yoshida Mika Considers Flamenco
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 2 and Women’s Individual Rounds 2 & 3

Men’s Team & Women’s Individual Events Launch Go Competitions at SportAccord World Mind Games (Thursday, December 12)
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 1 and Women’s Individual Round 1

2013 SportAccord World Mind Games Launch in Beijing
SportAccord World Mind Games North American Player Profiles
SportAccord World Mind Games Japanese Player Profiles
2013 SportAccord Online Tournament Into Final Stage

 

China Wins World Mind Games Pair Go Tournament; Meeting the Masters; Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun?

Wednesday December 18, 2013

China’s Chenxing Wang 5P and Ruiyang Zhou 9P (left) defeated Chinese Taipei’s Joanne Missingham 6P and Yuan-Jyun Wang 6P on Wednesday to win gold in the SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG) Pair Go competition. The 3-round event capped the third annual SAWMG competition, which included men’s team and women’s individual events in go, as well as competitions in chess, bridge, draughts and Chinese Chess, and ran December 12-18 in Beijing, China. The bronze medal was won by Park Jieun and Kim Jiseok, the pair from Korea. Click here for full go coverage on Ranka Online, complete event coverage on the SportAccord World Mind Games website – including video commentaries by Michael Redmond 9P on the SAWMG YouTube channel — and of course on the usgo.org website. Coverage this year included audio commentaries by Redmond on KGS; check KGS Plus under Recent Lectures.

Days 5&6 (Tuesday, 12/16 & Wednesday, 12/17) Summary: (winners denoted with links; click on links for game records, uncommented unless otherwise noted)
Round 1 (12/16): Europe (Kovaleva-Fan)-China; Korea-North America; Europe (Shikshin-Shikshina)-Japan; Chinese Taipei-Europe (Burdakova-Lisi).
Round 2 (12/16): Europe (Burdakova-Lisi)- North America; China-Japan (Redmond commentary); Europe (Shikshin-Shikshina)- Europe (Burdakova-Lisi); Chinese Taipei-Korea.
Round 3 (12/17): China-Chinese Taipei (Redmond commentary);  Japan-Korea; Europe (Burdakova-Lisi)-Europe (Shikshina-Shikshin).

Meeting the Masters: Students at the Huajiadi Experimental Primary School in Beijing got a chance to meet some of the SportAccord World Mind Games’ top go players and officials on Tuesday. The school is known for its cutting-edge approach to teaching and boasts nearly a thousand junior grade go players. The guests were greeted by two rooms of children buzzing with excitement. In the first classroom, a hands-on lesson on nakade grabbed the children’s attention, and in the second the pupils quickly settled down and answered questions about the history and rules of the game. The guests were then taken downstairs to the gymnasium, where boards had been set out for the 40 kids who would take on top professionals in nine-stone handicap games….click here for complete report.

Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun? “Let’s have dinner! We drink vodka!”  Not the first words you would expect to hear after the tense final of an international go final. But this is how bridge superstar Fulvio Fantoni greeted the rival Polish team at the conclusion of the Pairs Open at the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games. “We’re all good friends – we’ve known each other for many years,” Fantoni says… click here for full report

 

Go Spotting: Blanket Love Story

Wednesday December 18, 2013

Frequent Go-Spotting contributor Zhiping You came across this amazing go blanket online, which turns out to have a fascinating story behind its creation, which includes a love story, Hikaru No Go, learning how to crochet and instructions on how to make your very own go blanket.

Categories: Go Art,Go Spotting
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New Term Starts Soon at Guo Juan Internet Go School

Wednesday December 18, 2013

Guo Juan’s Internet Go School’s next term starts on the weekend of January 11. Group classes include separate groups for dan level, single digit kyu and double digit kyu players. “Join us,” says Guo, a 5-dan professional who’s been teaching in the West for more than twenty years. “You will have fun, meet new friends and improve your game!”
photo: Guo teaching at 2011 North Carolina workshop; photo courtesy Bob Bacon

 

U.S. Team to Play in 1st Zhu Gang Cup World Team Go Championship

Tuesday December 17, 2013

Mingjiu Jiang 7P (center), Stephanie (Mingming) Yin 1P and Zhaonian (Michael) Chen 8D will make up a U.S. team at the upcoming Zhu Gang Cup World Team Go Championship. The brand-new event for both professionals and amateurs features a significant prize-money pool and runs December 19-26 in Guangzhou, China. It’s hosted by the Chinese Weiqi Association  and the Guangzhou All-Sport Federation.

Categories: World
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Kelsey Dyer 1D & Quinn Baranoski 9K Sweep Slate and Shell Open

Tuesday December 17, 2013

While others were out fighting the holiday crowds at local malls in Northern Virginia, some 20 area go players had a better plan. “Win books to give as holiday gifts!” report Slate and Shell Open local organizers Gurujeet Khalsa and Gary Smith. Sponsor Slate and Shell supplied the prizes, which were won by Kelsey Dyer 1D and Quinn Baranoski 9K – who topped the event – along with other first place finishers, including Edward Zhang 6D, John Gipson 5K, and Mulan Liu 17K.  Second place finishers included Allan Abramson 2D, Mohan Sud 4K, Anderson Barreal 9K and Timothy Koh 22K.

Categories: U.S./North America
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US Pro Final Adds Youth Tourney

Tuesday December 17, 2013

The US Pro Qualification Tournament, which will be held in Los Angeles  Jan. 2-8, is adding a youth tournament for all ranks, to be held Jan 4-5, announced Myungwan Kim 9P, chair of the AGA’s pro system committee.  The event will be called the Milton N. Bradley Youth Go Championship, in honor of the late Bradley, who was devoted to youth go.  Players must be under the age of 17 (born on or after Jan. 5th 1996).  “I think it’s a good idea to hold a youth go tournament in LA area every year,” Kim told the Journal.  “We already have a great location, the Hotel Normandie, and kids can see professionals, the professional system and very serious games. It will help to stimulate kids to learn go, watching all these top players and their games.  I will play 13×13 simul games as well.”  Orange County organizer Kevin Chao will be the Tournament Director, and will handle registration.  He plans two four round tournaments, both 19×19 and13x13, for a total of eight games in two days.  19×19 games will be AGA-rated.  To register e-mail pogychao@yahoo.com. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Image: a page from Bradley’s Go for Kids, illustration by Seho Kim. Bradley’s cartoon form is seated at right.

Redmond: “Easy Does It”

Tuesday December 17, 2013

“Study life and death problems.” We’ve all heard that advice on how to get stronger at go, but it turns out that there’s a missing word that’s key to improving. The word is easy. Literally. Michael Redmond 9P revealed the missing word during one of his KGS audio commentaries on SAWMG games last weekend: “Study easy life and death problems.” Hard problems, “especially really complicated ones,” tend to be discouraging, “and they rarely come up in actual games,” Redmond said. Studying easy problems — “at least 15 minutes a day” — trains your eye to quickly see shapes and patterns and solving problems provides positive reinforcement that makes studying more likely, he adds. And since everyone’s definition of “easy” will necessarily be different, look for problems you can solve in two minutes or less.
- Chris Garlock

Korea Men’s Team & Zhiying Yu Win Gold in World Mind Games (updated with games & photos)

Monday December 16, 2013

Click here for latest winner results and Ranka Online’s full coverage. At 9 pm EST (6p PST) Tuesday night, Michael Redmond 9P and E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock will provide live audio commentary on KGS on the top boards at in the Pair Go competition.

The men’s team competition at the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games came to a dramatic finish Monday in Beijing as China battled Korea for the gold medal. The games on the first two boards both ended in resignation after intense fighting, with Korea’s Park Jeonghwan winning on board one and China’s Zhou Ruiyang on board two. On board three Korea’s Cho Hanseung, who had lost a game in the match against Chinese Taipei in the first round, faced China’s undefeated Wang Xi and eked out a win by a fraction of a stone, and the jubilant Korean team (right) took home the gold medals. The other two men’s matches were also dramatic. Chinese Taipei defeated the European team (which won 5th place) to capture the bronze medal, and Japan defeated North America (which finished 6th) to finish fourth, but Canada’s Yongfei Ge ended the North Americans’ winless streak by beating a Japanese opponent on board three. The European team also won a game, and they very nearly won two; Chinese Taipei’s lead player Chou Chun-hsun was sweating profusely after a last-minute come-from-behind victory over France’s Fan Hui. In the women’s individual competition, Yu Zhiying (left) defeated Wang Chenxing in the all-Chinese final match to take the gold, with Wang winning silver, and Korea’s Park Jieun the bronze. - James Davies; click here for his full report in Ranka

Day 5 (Monday, 12/16) Summary: (click on links for game records, uncommented unless otherwise noted)
Men’s team tournament (fifth round): Korea 2-1 over China: Park Jeonghwan beat Fan Tingyu (Redmond Commentary), Cho Hanseung beat Wang Xi; Zhou Ruiyang beat Kim Jiseok; Chinese Taipei 2-1 over Europe: Chou Chun-hsun beat Fan Hui, Ilya Shikshin beat Wang Yuan-jyun, Lin Chun-yen beat Pavol Lisy; Japan 2-1 over North America: Fujita Akihiko beat Huiren Yang, Hirata Tomoya beat Daniel Daehyuk Ko, Yongfei Ge (right) beat Tsuruta Kazushi. 

Women’s individual tournament (seventh round): Yu Zhiying (China) beat Wang Chenxing (China) (Redmond Commentary).
Check the KGS Plus 12/16 games (under Recent Lectures) for Redmond’s audio commentaries on both the men’s and women’s finals with EJ Managing Editor Chris Garlock) 
- photos by Ivan Vigano