American Go E-Journal

Registration Open for 2018 American Youth Go League

Saturday October 13, 2018

youth_go_league“Playing games regularly is crucial for young go players to improve,” says AGHS Vice President Jeremy Chiu, “The American Youth Go League gives the opportunity for young players to participate in online monthly leagues consisting of 4-5 rounds each. Using a ladder system, players will be matched against others of similar strength to play friendly but competitive games, while learning from each other. All players from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico of ages 18 and under are invited. This is a great way for young players to practice playing more serious online games. Rewards will be given to participating players.” - EJ Youth Correspondent Lionel Zhang

For more detailed rules, please click here.

For registration, please click here.

Strong field to vie for 2018 Cotsen Open title this weekend

Friday October 12, 2018

Looking to collect his fourth consecutive Cotsen Open title, Mark Lee 7d is facing a tough field of strong players this year, 2018.10.12_cotsen-set-upincluding Andrew Lu 7d, Bowen Zhang 7d, Hoon Jo 6d, William Lee 6d, Bo Luan 6d, Yi Wang 6d, Yixian Zhou 6d and Shengjie Zhou 6d. Registration for the 2-day tournament October 13-14 is already at 155, with players from 30 kyu to 7 dan, and walk-ins Saturday morning will be permitted: all players who want to play in the first round must be on line to sign in or register by 9:15a on Saturday. The tournament is held at the Korean Cultural Center (5505 Wilshire Blvd). Any questions, email cotsenopen@gmail.com. In addition to two days of competition, the Cotsen features free food truck lunches both days, roving masseuses and a pro-pro game Sunday morning. Follow the Board 1 action via the E-Journal on KGS and photos and news on AGA social media @thegaga on Twitter and @AmericanGoAssociation on Facebook.
photo: setting up on Friday; photo by Chris Garlock

AGF College Scholarships

Saturday October 6, 2018

AGF-logo-smallApplications are now being accepted for the American Go Foundation(AGF) college scholarshipThe program  recognizes high school students who have served as important youth organizers and promoters for the go community. To apply, download and complete the application form here.  Applicants should describe their accomplishments and volunteer work in a short essay. Letters of recommendation may also be included. Applicants whose enthusiasm and ambition have helped spread go in under-served areas will be given special consideration. Strong players who spend much of their time voluntarily teaching will also be considered, although the award focuses on promoters and organizers who have made substantial contributions during their go career. Applications are due Nov. 5th this year. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  

Cotsen registration deadline coming up soon

Wednesday October 3, 2018

Registration for the upcoming Cotsen Open closes on October 9th; click here now to register. The tournament is October 13-14 at the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles. In addition to the usual free shoulder massages, Kogi BBQ is 2018.10.03_2015-cotsen-IMG_0219catering both Saturday and Sunday; free lunch for all pre-registered attendees. Three Korean professionals — Dalhoon Ahn 9P, Seo Nungwuk 9P, and Na Jonghoon 8P — will be on hand for simul games on Saturday. “We will be streaming Hikaru No Go on the 3rd floor for anyone who wants to watch,” says TD Christopher Saenz.

Volunteers wanted for set-up, registration, game recording and post-tourney takedown; volunteers get a special dinner invitation and game recorders get E-Journal caps. Email cotsenopen@gmail.com ASAP if interested.

photo: 2015 Cotsen; photo by Brian Ferrari

 

Newcomer Alan Ai wins San Diego Go Club’s “Back-to-School” Tournament

Tuesday October 2, 2018

Thirty-seven players showed up last Sunday to take part in the San Diego Go Club’s “Back-to-School” Tournament.2018.10.02_SanDiegoOpen.players
A new resident to the area, Alan Ai (7.2-dan) won the Open section with a 3-0 record over a strong field including two 6-dans and a 5-dan. “The last time Ai was seen in San Diego, he took second place in the 2017 Redmond Cup at the U.S. Go Congress here,” reports San Diego Go Club President Ted Terpstra. “He is now enrolled at UCSD, so hopefully, he will become a familiar face at San  Diego Go Club events.” The club was honored to have two Chinese pros who now live in Southern California stop by to watch the competition: Hai Li and Weihan Hua, who is the president of the UCSD Go Club.
Players going 3-0 in the Handicap Sections were Seowoo Wang (2.5-dan) in the 3D-5K bracket, Warren Andrews (6.7-Kyu) in the 5K-10K bracket, Tony 2018.10.02_SanDiego-Handicap.playersMorgan Yang (12-Kyu) in the 10K-20K bracket, and Eric Green Yang (25-Kyu) and Andy Shunwei Zhou (20-Kyu) in the 20K-30K bracket.
The tournament was held at the San Diego Chess Club in Balboa Park, which will also be the site for the 2018 California State Go Championship. The first annual event will be a 5-round tournament to be held on the Saturday and Sunday after Thanksgiving, November 24&25. Free registration for the California Championship is now open here.
photos by Henry You

Pandanet AGA City League Registration

Monday October 1, 2018

2017.10.03_PANDANETPandanet AGA City League registration continues. Join some of the strongest players in the US and Canada in competing throughout the year. Compete for $14,000 in prizes in the multiple leagues. This tournament will run from November to May. Check the rules  for full tournament details . Any questions contact TD Steve Colburn. Show off your city’s strength this year! It could be your team joining us for the finals at the US Go Congress next year in Madison, Wisconsin.

The Power Report: Ichiriki wins Ryusei; Tianfu Cup starts; Cho picks up first win in Meijin challenge; Kisei play-off tournament starts; Iyama wins in Samsung

Monday October 1, 2018

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal2018.10.01_27ryusei Ichiriki

Ichiriki wins Ryusei: The Ryusei is a TV tournament using the NHK format, that is, the time allowance is 30 seconds a move plus ten minutes extra time to be used in one-minute units. The preliminary tournament actually allots more time: one hour per player plus one-minute byo-yomi. The final of the 27th Ryusei was telecast on September 24 (the game was played on July 23). It paired two top young players: Ichiriki Ryo 8P (aged 21, right), who won the 25th Ryusei, and Motoki Katsuya 8P (aged 22 when the game was played, but now 23), who challenged for last year’s Honinbo title. Taking black, Ichiriki won by resig. after 231 moves. The prize money is six million yen (about $55,000). Until now, the winner of the Japanese Ryusei played the winner of the Chinese Ryusei, but a Korean Ryusei tournament has also been founded, so it will be expanded to a three-way play-off.

Tianfu Cup starts: The opening round of the firstTianfu Cup World Go Professional Championship, yet another new international tournament founded in China, was held at the Chinese Qiyuan (Ki-in) in Beijing from September 21 to 26. It is organized a little differently from the other international tournaments: the 32 players taking part are divided into two blocks, that is, two knock-out tournaments, each starting with 16 players. These four-round tournaments are collectively referred to as Round 1. The winner and the other finalist in each block go on to the second stage, called Round 2. Group A was won by Jiang Weijie 9P (China), who beat Chen Yaoye 9P (China) and Group B by Park Junghwan 9P (Korea), who beat his compatriot Shin Jinseo 9P. The semifinal pairings will be A Block #1 v. Block #2 and B Block #1 v. A Block #2. I don’t have the schedule for Round 2. Six players from Japan took part, of whom the only one to survive the first round (of “Round 1”) was Yamashita Keigo. He was eliminated in the next round. Detailed results these games are given below:
Round 1 (Sept. 21). Fan Tingyu 9P (China) (B) beat Kyo Kagen (Xu Jiayuan) 8P (Japan) by resig.; Yamashita Keigo 9P (Japan) (W) beat Wang Yuanjun 8P (Chinese Taipei) by resig.; Gu Zihao 9P (China) (W) beat Murakawa Daisuke 8P (Japan) by resig.; Park Junghwan 9P (Korea) (B) beat Ichiriki Ryo 8P (Japan) by resig.; Peng Liyao 7P (China) (W) beat Motoki Katsuya 8P (Japan) by resig.; Tang Weixing 9P (China) (B) beat Yo Seiki (Yu Zhengqi) 7P (Japan) by resig.
Round 2 (September 22). Gu Jihao (B) beat Yamashita by resig.
NOTES:
First prize is 2,000,000 yuan (about $290,000). The time allowance is two hours each plus one-minute byo-yomi x 5. This is China’s fifth international tournament, according to Go Weekly, which also noted that out of its 13 players in Round 1, 11 have won world championships. The depth of Chinese go is staggering. Of Korea’s six representatives, four have won world titles. Lee Changho of Korea, who in the 90s and early 2000s dominated world go, winning an unrivalled 21 international titles, made a rare appearance in this tournament. He is now 43. He lost to Xie Erhao 9P of China in the first 2018.10.01_Meijin 3 Cho looks happyround. Both Iyama Yuta and Shibano Toramaru, who are usually sure selections to represent Japan, were too busy to take part. You have to assume you might win all your games, so you have to set aside six days plus travel time, which for Iyama is certainly not easy.

Cho picks up first win in Meijin challenge: The third game of the 43rd Meijin title match was held at the Shiroyama Hotel Kagoshima in Kagoshima City, Kagoshima Prefecture, on September 25 and 26. It’s become a commonplace to observe that fighting starts earlier in professional games than in the old days, but even so the no-holds-barred aggression on display in this game was impressive. And it didn’t let up. In the midst of all the fighting, Cho U (left) steadily racked up some small gains and by the end, on move 278, had a lead of 4.5 points, which is considered a convincing win among professionals. After his bad start, Cho would have been relieved to get a point on the board.  The fourth game will be played on October 10 and 11.

Kisei play-off tournament starts: The first game in the knockout tournament to decide the challenger for the 43rd Kisei title was held on September 27. Taking black, Onishi Ryuhei 3P beat Shibano Toramaru 7P by 4.5 points. In the next game, Onishi will play Murakawa Daisuke, the winner of the A League. Shibano and Onishi are both 18; the former has attracted more attention recently, but, as this result shows, he has rivals in his own age group. The two are sometimes bracketed as “the dragon and the tiger,” as “tora” in the former’s name means “tiger,” and “ryu” in the latter’s means “dragon.2018.10.01_samsung Li (left) v. Iyama” Shibano is on top of the “most games won” list this year, with 40-15, but Onishi is in second place on 34-6; the win against Shibano was his 14th in a winning streak that’s still going.

Iyama wins in Samsung : On the point of submitting this report, I learned that Iyama Yuta won his game in the round of 16 in the Samsung Cup, held on October 1. Taking black, he beat Li Jianhao 7P of China by resig. In the quarterfinals, hold on October 2, he will meet Xie Erhao 9P (China), who beat him 2-1 in the 22nd LG Cup final played in February this year.

Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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First Texas State Championship set for Oct 20-21 in Austin

Saturday September 29, 2018

The first Texas State Championship will be held October 20-21 in Austin, Texas. The tournament is part of the new system of state championships being developed by the American Go Association.

The Texas tournament — a five round Swiss format — is open to any player who is an AGA member and residing in Texas. The winner will be awarded a State Championship trophy, and have their name engraved on a separate perennial trophy that will be passed from year to year with winners names engraved. In addition, there will be other prizes awarded.
“In addition to the State Championship tournament (which will NOT be handicapped), we will in parallel run a handicap tournament for others wishing to play in a tournament but NOT compete for the Texas State Champion title,” reports Bart Jacob. Click here for details and here to register.

10/1 deadline for pro or amateur tepresentative for Bingsheng Cup

Friday September 28, 2018

The 8th Qionglong Mountain Bingsheng Cup, a women’s weiqi tournament, is seeking a representative from North America, all expenses covered. The tournament will be held October 30-November 5 in Suzhou, China. Professional and amateur women interested in representing North America in this event should send an e-mail to tournaments@usgo.org. Please reply no later than Monday, October 1st, so that we may run a preliminary tournament among the interested players prior to the registration deadline.
- Jeff Shaevel, AGA National Tournament Coordinator 

Applications open for 17th World Students Go Oza Championship prelim

Wednesday September 26, 2018

The 17th World Students Go Oza Championship will be held from Feb 18 to 22, 2019 in Tokyo, Japan.  Sixteen students from around the world will come together in Japan to decide the world’s number one student player.  To select the 16 students, an online preliminary round will be held on Pandanet.  Two students from the Americas will be selected; their airfare and accommodations will be covered by the event organizers.  Click here  for details and here for the entry form . The application deadline is Oct 21. Students under the age of 30 and currently enrolled in an American university/college may participate in the preliminary round, irrespective of their nationality.

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