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The Traveling Board: Osaka Go Camp

Sunday July 28, 2013

By Peter Schumer

Beautifully organized, the recent Osaka Go Camp drew about 35 “campers” from nearly a dozen countries.  Most of the instruction was in English, but there was a good bit of Japanese, French, and German mixed in amongst us and it made for quite an international and festive feeling.

Though ages ranged from mid-teens to early 70′s and our ranks ran the gamut from 20 kyu up to 7 dan, everyone got along really well and seemed genuinely friendly and supportive of one another. Every day there was a scheduled match followed by professional game reviews, several lectures, and simuls with pros.

One of the highlights was a visit and simultaneous games with Yuki Satoshi, currently Judan.  We also played lots of friendship matches with various local go clubs and go students of all ages. The most fun for me was a series of games with students at the Kansai Kiin who ranged in age from 7 to 12 but who were all at least 2 dan in strength.  It was the one group that had a winning record against us.

There were also many go-related sightseeing trips to Kyoto, Nara, Innoshima, Hiroshima, and the beautiful island of Miyajima. In Innoshima, we visited the Shusaku Museum and memorial site, where we learned that there are over 2000 local go players in a town of just 20,000, and it seemed that a good percentage of them showed up to test our go prowess. Two go boards at the Shusaku museum (left) were especially interesting: the one on the right is Go Seigen’s retirement board and stones, celebrating 70 years of an outstanding professional career in Japan, while the older board on the left belonged to Shusaku and was given to him by his patron Lord Asano (watch for Jan Engelhardt’s report on the Innoshima visit in an upcoming EJ).

After camp ended, I had a few extra days for travel.  One day I spent visiting the Shinto grand shrines in Ise, and my last full travel day was to Uji, a lovely small town just south of Kyoto. It is best known for growing arguably the best green tea in Japan and for several beautiful Buddhist temples, especially the Byodo-In which contains the famous Phoenix Hall.  Currently it is being restored and so was covered up, but fortunately I’d seen it on a previous visit.  This short-lived disappointment propelled me to walk farther along the Uji River until I came to the Tale of Genji Museum.  The last ten chapters of this classic of Japanese literature take place in Uji and so the museum largely focuses on them, but there are a couple of important scenes where go plays a significant role and luckily one of the life-sized displays (top right) was of such a scene (photo).
- A longtime local go organizer, Schumer founded the Vermont Go Club

Categories: Traveling Go Board
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Maeda Osaka Go Camp Details Released

Friday February 8, 2013

New details have just been released on the Kansai-Kiin’s 3-week intensive go camp with Maeda Ryo 6P in Osaka this summer (Maeda Organizing 2013 Go Camp in Osaka 8/6/2012 EJ). It will be held at the Osaka University of Commerce from June 30 – July 20. Attendees will receive intensive training from Kansai-Kiin professionals, play against top amateur players and former inseis while they make friends and go sightseeing around historical cities like Kyoto, Nara, and Himeji. There are also some optional tours to Hiroshima and/or the Shusaku Memorial Museum in Innoshima. Register before February 28 and get a 5,000-yen discount. “Maeda is hoping — and excited — to show the best part of Japan and have great time with attendees!” reports Akane Negishi.
- photo: Maeda at the 2012 US Go Congress; photo by Chris Garlock

Jan Simara Surprise Winner at Euro Championship; The Red Dress Tesuji; U.S. Women’s Tournament Crosstab

Sunday August 26, 2012

Jan Simara Surprise Winner at Euro Championship: Jan Simara 6D was the surprise winner of this year’s European Championship title when he won the deciding game against Ilya Shikshin (click here for the game) at the recent European Go Congress. Simara lives in Zlin in the Czech Republic and just finished university, where he majored in teaching IT. He learned go in chess camp when he was 14 – he’d been playing chess since the age of six — and about two years later quit chess and started to play go. “I studied seriously only once about six years ago for an year when I was about 1-dan,” Simara said, “Mostly reading the Shusaku book Invincible. otherwise I sometimes replay top pro games and do tsumego when I’m in a train going to a tournament.” In an interview with EuroGoTV, Simara’s advice for new players was “Play mainly for joy, never be stressed about results.” Click here for pairings and game records. Final standings for the 2012 European Championship: 1st: Jan Simara; 2nd: Ilya Shikshin; 3rd: Pavol Lisy; 4th: Thomas Debarre; 5th: Ondrej Silt; 6th: Antti Tormanen; 7th: Mateusz Surma; 8th: Gheorghe Cornel Burzo.
- Alain Cano, special European correspondent for the E-Journal; photo by Olivier Dulac

The Red Dress Tesuji: A very stylish and hip 60-second video promoting the upcoming European Women’s Go Championship has been released. The Women’s Go Championship and a side tournament are being organized as part of the 2012 European Go Cup Brno, which is being held September 7-9 in Brno, South Moravia in the Czech Republic.

U.S. Women’s Tournament Crosstab: Tournament Director Lisa Scott has just sent in the crosstab for the recent Women’s Tournament at the U.S. Open, which was won by Kelsey Dyer 1D.

Maeda Organizing 2013 Go Camp in Osaka

Monday August 6, 2012

Maeda Ryo 6P, the popular Japanese professional who’s a regular attendee at the annual U.S.Go Congress, is organizing a 3-week intensive go camp in Osaka next year. “I guarantee a 3-stone improvement for kyu players,” Maeda (at left) smilingly told the E-Journal Monday, “and one stone for dan players.”  Classes will run five days a week, with two days off for sight-seeing to places like the Shusaku Memorial Museum in Innoshima as well as Kyoto, Nara and Himeji. Campers will play league games in the morning, with teaching games with pros – 4-5 will be available daily — in the afternoon, along with lectures, quizzes and simuls, and in the evening there will be casual games with local amateur players. Li Ting 1P — another popular Congress pro — is also helping organize the camp, along with Hayashi Kouzou 6P, with the support of the Kansai Ki-in. Email Osaka.go.2013@gmail.com for more info or to reserve your space.
photo: Maeda giving a lecture Monday at the U.S. Go Congress; photo by Chris Garlock 

Summer 2012 GoGoD Release Includes 2,000 Cho Chikun Games

Friday July 20, 2012

The Summer 2012 GoGoD (Games of Go on Disk) update is now available and on its way to subscribers, with a total of 72,644 games in the Database, reports T Mark Hall. “This is a landmark issue,” says Hall. “We now have exactly 2,000 games featuring Cho Chikun. He beat Cho Hun-hyeon as the first to that mark by a whisker. And since we are in Golden Oldies mood, let us recall and salute Jan van Rongen, who collaborated with us on Chikun’s collection in its early days.” Other new material includes “a new Kitani game we found on the day we went to press, but apart from that there has been a long catalogue of new finds of old masters’ games. The most significant perhaps are the three new games by Shusaku which we wrote about in New In Go. Of course the Krypton Kiddies who only wish to drive their 4×4 josekis are not forgotten. You will find well over 1,200 new games for 2012 alone.” Fun stuff includes some new 13×13 blindfolded-pro games, as well as pro games at 9×9, 13×13, 15×15, 17×17 and 21×21. Hall says that GoGod is changing the way the database is sold. “Basically, we are dropping the subscription system at the end of this year, although purchasers who have already subscribed will get their copies as normal,” Hall says. “From now on, all sales will be at the plain vanilla price of $30. This gives us the freedom to update at different times in the year, when we reach notable targets, for instance.”

Spring Crop of Go Books: 300 Tesuji Problems, Modern Master Games, Punishing and Correcting Joseki Mistakes, Five Hundred and One Tesuji Problems, Joseki Dictionary Vol. 3 & Life of Honinbo Shuei

Wednesday May 23, 2012

Spring has brought an early crop of go books, some brand new and others re-issued in new formats. Here are  six that have just been released, two each on joseki and tesuji, a historical look at tournament go in Japan and a bio of “Meijin of Meijins” Honinbo Shuei.

Don’t let the “4-dan to 7-dan” subtitle of Kiseido’ s 300 Tesuji Problems scare you off. Though the problems in this book, Volume 5 of the Graded Go Problems for Dan Players series, are quite challenging, “even if you are unable to solve them, contemplating the problems, then studying the solutions will broaden your tactical horizons by revealing new possibilities in fighting techniques,” says go publisher Richard Bozulich. Also new from Kiseido is Modern Master Games, Volume One, The Dawn of Tournament Go by Rob van Zeijst and Richard Bozulich with historical notes by John Power. A survey of Japanese go from the founding of the Honinbo tournament in the 1940s to the Meijin and Judan tournaments in the 1960s, Modern Master Games contains eleven exciting games with detailed commentaries that chronicle the Japanese go scene during the Second World War, including the “Atomic Bomb Game” between Iwamoto and Hashimoto, and the rise of Sakata and Takagawa’s dominance of the Honinbo title in the post-war era. Kiseido notes that many of their books “are now available on the iPad and iPhone through Smart Go.” Available books  can be purchased by downloading the free SmartGo Books app from the App Store, then use in-app purchase. New titles are being added regularly.

SmartGo Books has been updated with two new books, and the added feature of being able to play arbitrary moves in diagrams, which is especially valuable for problem books. The new books are Punishing and Correcting Joseki Mistakes by Mingjiu Jiang 7 dan and Adam Miller, a popular Slate & Shell book that has been out of print, and Five Hundred and One Tesuji Problems by Richard Bozulich, featuring a large variety of tesuji problems. SmartGo Books for the iPad and iPhone has always allowed users to replay moves in diagrams. “In version 1.5, you can also play your own moves directly in the diagram,” says author Anders Kierulf. “This is especially helpful for problem diagrams, where SmartGo Books will provide feedback on whether your move is right or wrong.” For problem books like 501 Opening Problems or the newly added Five Hundred and One Tesuji Problems, Kierulf says, “this is a game changer.”

Volume 3 of Robert Jasiek’s Joseki Dictionary completes the German 5-dan author’s joseki series. Jasiek’s intent is to make learning joseki easier with a method of evaluation that enables players to “distinguish equal from one-sided results correctly” and emphasizes understanding strategy and judgment. His dictionary explains the strategic choices in each joseki, evaluating the territory and influence of each sequence, identifying types of josekis, from “finished thick settling” to “lean and attack.” Using databases of professional games, Volume 3 includes modern josekis and 130 mostly professional game examples. Click here for a sample and Jasiek’s overview.

GoGoD is releasing a new e-book for the Kindle, The Life of Honinbo Shuei, Volume 1 of a trilogy, The Life, Games and Commentaries of Honinbo Shuei, by John Fairbairn. A famous go player in Japan at the end of the 19th century, Shuei was known as the “Meijin of Meijins” and is still revered by many modern professionals. Overcoming a life full of hardship and controversy, Shuei rose to dominate the go world in his forties, a classic example of “great talents mature late.” This first volume covers Shuei’s biography, with forthcoming volumes to provide detailed commentaries on about eighty of his games and commentaries by Shuei himself on games by other players. Volume 1 covers Shuei’s own life in detail, and sets it firmly in the context of the go scene and the social and political scene at the time, especially the long-running spat between the Honinbos and the Hoensha. Included are juicy tidbits like the tragic end of Honinbo Shuwa, Shuetsu’s breakdown, the fate of the Driftwood Board, the sordid truth about Shusaku’s Castle Games and why Shuei disappeared from the go scene for years at a time.

EuroGo Updates: March 24-April 1

Monday April 30, 2012

Romania: In-Seong Hwang 8d (right) won the 2012 Shusaku Cup Romania, winning all six games in the March 30-April 1 tournament. Hwang donated 200 Euro of his 1,200 Euro winnings to Romanian youth players. In second was Artem Kachanovskyji 7d (left) from Ukraine, who only lost to In-seong in an epic battle watched by more than 550 on KGS. Third place was won by another young talented Ukraine player, Arii Kravets 5d who bested many favorites like Cristian Pop 7d, Ondrej Silt 6d, Csaba Mero 6d and Pal Balogh 6d. Click here to see the deciding game between Hwang and Kachanovskyji.  Results15350038

The Bistrita Spring Cup, played from 3/23-24 in Bistrita, Romania, was won by Denis Dobranis 4k (left), second came Daniel Haja 6k and third was Tudor Berende 5k. Result table

Croatia: The 445th Velika Gorica weekend-go-tournament, played on 3/31 in Velika Gorica, Croatia, was won by Robert Jovicic 2k, second came Mladen Smud 1k and third was Marko Ugarcina 6k. Result table . 

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Austria Austria: The Linzer Go Turnier 2012, played March3/24-25 in Linz, Austria, was won by Pavol Lisy 6d (photo), second came Lothar Spiegel 4d and third was Lukas Podpera 5dResult table .

Poland Poland:  The Warszawa, played on March 25 in Warszawa, Poland, was won by Arkadiusz Kindziuk 1d, second came Karol Cieslak 1d and third was Stefan Wroclawski 3k. Result table.

Netherlands The Netherlands: The 39e Keizer Karel Toernooi Zwitsers tournament, played from 3/17-18 in Nijmegen, Netherlands, was won by Paul Haanen 10k, second came Nicole de Beer 10k and third was Mark de Groot 10k. Result table.

Serbia Serbia: The Serbian Championship, played March from March 23-25 in Kragujevac, Serbia, was won by Nikola Mitic 5d ( photo ), second came Misa Alimpic 3d and third was Dragan Mitic 3d. Result table

14713996Italy Italy: The Yama no Kaze 3 tournament, played from March 24-25 in Bassano del Grappa, Italy, was won by Carlo Metta 3d ( photo ), second came Viktor Bogdanov 4d and third was Alessandro Pace 2d. Result table .

Germany Germany: The Baduk Botschafter Cup/Gruppe 2 tournament, played from March 24-25 in Kassel, Germany, was won by Donald Eckart 4k, second came Karen Schomberg 3k ( photo ) and third was Thomas Gottstein 5k. Result table . The Baduk Botschafter Cup / Gruppe 1 was won byAndre Staedtler 3d ( photo ), second came Lukas Kraemer 5d and third was Jonas Welticke 4dResult table .
- excerpted from reports on EuroGoTV.com

Categories: Europe
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EuroGoTV-News: December 31-January 17

Sunday January 22, 2012

Poland: Kamil Chwedyna 4d (photo) won the Black Stone tournament, played 1/7-8 in Katowice, Poland. Click here for results. Lithuania: Gytis Vasiliauskas 1d was the winner at the 1/17 Trys Karaliai tournament in Vilnius, Lithuania. Click here for results. Spain: Sabina Rodriguez 9k topped the La Carboneria tournament played 1/7 in Sevilla, Spain. Click here for results. Croatia: Mladen Smud 1k won the Silvester tournament, played 12/31in Velika Gorica, Croatia. Click here for results. Zvonko Bednjanec 3k took first place in the Velika Gorica tournament 1/7 in Velika Gorica, Croatia. Click here for results. Upcoming European Tournaments: France: The 27th annual Antony Tournament, which also this year includes the 40th Paris Tournament (Antony is a Paris suburb) is set for 2/4-5. Romania: the Shusaku Tournament is scheduled for March 30 thru April 1 and features strong Chinese pros as guests, many strong players and, say organizers, “is well known for its parties.”
- Excerpted from reports – including full results — on EuroGoTV

Categories: Europe
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Go Classified: Books for Sale

Monday July 11, 2011

All in very good condition! $15 – Basic Techniques of Go – hardcover; $20 – Modern Joseki & Fuseki, Volume 1 – hardcover (2-book set); $20 – Modern Joseki & Fuseki, Volume 2 – hardcover (2-book set); $40 – Strategic Concepts of Go – hardcover; $40 – The 1971 Honinbo Tournament – hardcover; $40 – The Middle Game of Go – hardcover; $40 – The World of Ki – hardcover; $10 – 38 Basic Joseki – paperback; $40 – Appreciating Famous Games – paperback; $40 – Attack & Defense – paperback ; $5 – Go & Go-Moku – paper; $5 – Go as Communication – paperback; $5 – Go for Beginners – paperback; $5 – How to Play Go – paper, spiral-bound ; $5 – In the Beginning – paperback; $40 – Invincible: The Games of Shusaku – paperback; $10 – Kage’s Secret Chronicles of Handicap Go – paperback; $10 – Les Bases Techniques du Go – paperback, French;$10 – Lessons in the Fundamentals of Go – paperback; $10 – Life & Death – paperback; $10 – Tesuji – paperback; $50 – The Breakthrough to Shodan – paperback; $10 – The Endgame – paperback; $10 – The Vital Points of Go – paper, spiral-bound; $10 – What’s Your Rating? – paperback. PLUS: Learn to Play Go, Volumes 1-5; sold as a complete set for $50 each. email antonninno@yahoo.com

Categories: Go Classified
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DAI PEAKS IN PARIS

Saturday April 10, 2010

Dai Junfu 7d (r) of Lyon won the Paris Open in Antony, April 3-5, undefeated 6-0.  Csaba Mero 6d of Hungary lost only to Dai to finish for silver. Favorite Hwang In-Seong 8d had to settle for bronze on sos. Also with four wins: French Championne Yanqi Zhang 6d, Christian Pop 7d (Romania) and Pal Balogh 6d (Hungary). The latter won the overall classement of the Pandanet season this year. The field was very strong, like last week’s Shusaku Cup in Romania and attendance was similarly high: 224 took part. Between rounds, Dai autographed copies of his new book on the middle game. Click here for the full results.
- Peter Dijkema, after EuroGoTV.com

Categories: Europe
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