American Go E-Journal

Solid turnout expected at Maryland Open

Thursday May 18, 2017

Over 30 players have already registered for the 44th annual Maryland Open, coming up May 27-28. Registered players so far include two pros, reports organizer Keith Arnold. There are prizes in all sections in the two-day event and players can participate in one or both days. Register here.

Categories: U.S./North America
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Artem Kachanovskyi wins Grand Slam in Berlin

Wednesday May 17, 2017

A Grand Slam tournament is the top level tournament in the European Go Federation’s Grand Prix, and the only level for which special pre-qualification conditions exist. The first such of 2017 took place in Berlin, starting on the 28th of April, and running for 4 days, the event saw 12 of the strongest European players battle it out for a 10,000 euro prize. The winner of the event was Artem Kachanovskyi (1p) who comes from Ukraine, he beat the Russian player Alexander Dinerchtein (3p) in the final by a margin of 5.5 points. Amusingly, before the event Alexander stated that Artem was the only opponent he felt he would be unable to defeat. Slovakia’s Pavol Lisy (1p) won the play-off for third place, defeating Ilya Shikshin (1p). You can see the full results here.

At the same time, a team tournament was running – the China Cup Berlin. This event was won by deceptively titled “Losers without Borders” (Dominik Boviz (6d), Thomas Debarre (6d), Nikola Mitic (6d)), a team made up of players who were knocked out of the Grand Slam on day 1. They finished ahead of second place “Team Berlin” (Johannes Obenaus(6d), Kim Seongjin(8d), Xu Yin(6d), Zhang Yi(5d)), and third place “The Dudes” (Cristian Pop(7d), Catalin Taranu(5p), Cornel Burzo(6d)). Full reports of both events are available here and here. There will be a second Grand Slam event in Warsaw this year.

Categories: Europe
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AGA Master Review Series, Game 36: Gu Zihao 9p [W] vs. Master 9p [B]

Wednesday May 17, 2017

“Gu Zihao was born in 1998, and won the Limin Cup (youth) International tournament in 2015,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal, of the thirty-sixth game of Master (AlphaGo). “He is moving up in the rankings, 2017.05.17_AGA Master Review Series, Game 36and now is in the top 30 players in the world. Master plays its’ distinctive style in all parts of the board, with the most shocking move being an early invasion to the 3-3 point.”

[link]

Hold an AlphaGo Match Viewing and Kibitzing Party

Wednesday May 17, 2017

Next week’s face off between Ke Jie 9p and DeepMind’s updated AlphaGo software promises to be more than a long-awaited grudge match (“One small bleep for a computer, one giant push for mankind,” commented AGA President Andy Okun). It will also be be a chance to think about the future of go. Moves suggested by AlphaGo have already become common in online and professional tournament play as players build, break and rebuild their opening and middle game theories. “More than anything else, then, this is a chance to learn new things about the game by analyzing, commenting on, arguing about and playing over the moves thrown off in the brawling between China’s fearsome slugger and Google’s triumph of modern engineering,” Okun said. “We should do this together.” To this end, any chapter that holds an AlphaGo viewing party during next week’s event is eligible for $100 of (non-alcohol) expenses supported by the AGA president’s discretionary chapter rewards points pool, in addition to using their own points. Since the games are in Asia and may be late at night, watching online later is fine. Conditions are that the chapter is current, that more than a couple of people attend, that it be before May 30, and that you send the EJ a notice of the event beforehand so we can put word out about it, and an account of the event and a couple of pictures. Send questions to president@usgo.org.

Categories: Uncategorized
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Redmond Reviews: Honinbo Dosaku and Master/AlphaGo

Sunday May 14, 2017

“In this game from 1670 Honinbo Dosaku plays White against Yasui Chitetsu, his major rival in the Yasui house,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal. “In this game I will comment on Dosaku’s brilliant sabaki in the early middlegame, in a position that I find to resemble the way Master invaded the Chinese opening in games 22 and 48.”

[link]

Early Bird Registration open for Nihon Ki-in Summer Go Camp (updated link)

Sunday May 14, 2017

The annual Nihon Ki-in Summer Go Camp is an intensive training program for non-Japanese go players who want to raise their level of play.2017.05.13_nihon-kiin-camp This year’s Camp will be held in Kyoto, Osaka and Tokyo August 25-September 6. “Besides many famous professionals’ providing you with simul games, reviews and lectures, there are also lots of go events that you will participate in and enjoy during the Camp!” says the Nihon Ki-in’s Tom Urasoe. Michael Redmond 9P will be one of the camp’s main instructors, and camp participants will also enjoy Japan’s most popular amateur go tournament with over 1,500 players in Tokyo. Register before May 31 and get 15% off; click here for details. Read Peter Schumer’s report on last year’s camp here.
NOTE: links have been updated

Categories: Japan
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AGA Master Review Series, Game 22: Master 9p [W] vs. Chen Yaoye 9p [B]

Saturday May 13, 2017

“Chen became the youngest player to promote to 9P at 17 when he was awarded with the rank for being a finalist in two world tournaments in 2006,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal, of the twenty-second game of Master (AlphaGo). “He is still in the top handful of players, and is known for his energetic and innovative play.”

[link]

2017 Cotsen Open dates set

Saturday May 13, 2017

The 2017 Cotsen Open dates have been confirmed for October 21-22 at the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles. Registration will open soon,2017.05.13_cotsen-IMG_2035 says Tournament Organizer Christopher Saenz. As usual registration fees will be refunded for all players who show up both days, free lunch is provided by tournament sponsor Eric Cotsen (right), and of course free shoulder massages.

“The Surrounding Game” screens at festivals nationwide

Thursday May 11, 2017

After a series of festival screenings in California, Texas, and Iowa, the go documentary “The Surrounding Game” will screen on June 10-11 at2017.05.11_roxie-surrounding SFDocFest in San Francisco and on June 10 at the Canadian Sport Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. Each screening will be followed by a Q/A with one of the directors/producers, as well as special guest Gansheng Shi 1p in Toronto. “We’ve gotten great audience response at all the festivals we’ve attended. In a few weeks we’ll be rolling out our distribution and screening plans, which includes go clubs worldwide”, reports co-director/producer Cole D. Pruitt.

You can watch the trailer here.

Tickets are now available for the San Francisco and Toronto screenings. 

photo: The Roxie SFDocFest venue

Categories: U.S./North America
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The Power Report (3): Mi wins Japan-China Ryusei, DeepZenGo beats Fujisawa; Kisei S League starts; Iyama leads Meijin League

Thursday May 11, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal2017.05.11 DeepZenGo v Rina

Mi wins Japan-China Ryusei, DeepZenGo beats Fujisawa: The 3rd Japan-China Ryusei play-off was held in the Belle Salle hall in front of Iidabashi Station in Tokyo on April 29. Mi Yuting 9P, the winner of the 3rd Chinese Ryusei title, took white against Ichiriki Ryo 7P, winner of the 25th Japanese Ryusei title, and forced a 2017.05.11 JC Ryuseiresignation after 175 moves. The game started at 4 p.m. and was telecast live on the Igo Shogi Channel (left)The play-off was preceded by an exhibition game between Fujisawa Rina, Women’s Honinbo, and the program DeepZenGo (right). Fujisawa had 30 minutes followed by 30 seconds per move plus 15 minutes to be used in one-minute units. The program had just 45 minutes. The game started at 1 p.m. Taking black, DeepZenGo won by resig. after 159 moves.

Kisei S League starts: The top league in the 42nd Kisei tournament, the S League, has finally got off to a start, some weeks behind the lower A, B, and C Leagues. The members, in order of ranking are: Kono Rin 9P, Yamashita Keigo 9P, Murakawa Daisuke 8P, Ichiriki Ryo 7P, Cho U 9P, and So Yokoku 9P. The first two games were played on April 27. Yamashita (W) beat So by resig., and Ichiriki (B) beat Cho by resig.

Iyama leads Meijin League: The first two games in the sixth round of the 42nd Meijin League were played recently, and the result is that the gap at the top has widened. On 4-0, Iyama Yuta was the only undefeated player in the league, and his nearest rival was Yamashita Keigo on 4-1. However, Yamashita suffered a loss to Hane Naoki on May 4, and is now two points behind Iyama, though the latter has played two fewer games. This was Hane’s first win in the league.
(April 24) Yo Seiki 7P (W) beat Hane Naoki 7P by resig.
(April 27) Murakawa Daisuke 8P (B) beat Sakai Hideyuki 8P by resig.
(May 4) Hane Naoki 9P (W) beat Yamashita Keigo 9P by resig.; Kono Rin 9P (B) beat Yo Seiki 7P by resig.

Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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