American Go E-Journal

Kiseido Releases 1st 3 Volumes of “Graded Go Problems” Series

Monday November 16, 2009

Kiseido has just published the first three books of a seven-volume series, reports publisher Richard Bozulich. Graded Go Problems for Dan Players “is a translation of a 14-volume series put out by the Nihon Ki-in, compressed into seven volumes,” Bozulich tells the E-Journal. Targeted at aspiring dan players, the series is designed to provide low-kyu and low-dan players with the essential grounding in the basics of life-and-death, tesuji, and joseki needed to develop deeper and more accurate reading and the knowledge they need to compete as dan players. In “300 Life-and-Death Problems,” “300 Tesuji Problems,” and “300 Joseki Problems,” the level of the problems starts at around 5-kyu and works up to 3-dan, with the majority in the 1- to 3-dan bracket. The series will continue with volumes four to six, containing life-and-death, tesuji, and joseki problems for 3-dan players and stronger. Volumes seven will cover the opening (fuseki) and the middle game. Expected publication date for Volumes Four to Six is Spring 2010 and Summer 2010 for Volume Seven.

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GoGoD Hits 60K-Game Mark

Monday November 16, 2009

GoGoD’s database of professional tournaments now exceeds 60,000 games, reports T Mark Hall. “This is the most accurate, consistent and exact database in existence in the West, backed by John Fairbairn’s Names Dictionary and his Tournament Database,” Hall tells the E-Journal. “While we always add all the games from the current tournament scene, we have been busy in the last six months adding games from the 1950s and 1980s, including previously unknown games by Go Seigen and other games by famous players, not in their collected games,” says Hall. “We pride ourselves on providing games no-one else can easily get, but of course, as always, we are bang up to date.” The Winter 2009 edition is due out on December 7 and the celebrate the 60,000-game milestone, GoGoD is being offered at a discounted rate of $30 for a single copy and $40 for a copy plus an update in a year’s time. Contact Hall at tmark@gogod.demon.co.uk to order or for details.

GO SPOTTING/GO PHOTO: Go During U.S. Internships in ‘42

Monday November 2, 2009

GO SPOTTING/GO PHOTO: A 1942 Life Magazine photo of Japanese American men playing go at the Heart Mountain Relocation Camp in Wyoming is among the Life go photos* found online by EJ reader Troy Anderson. Another one shows “Japanese go game being played at alien relocation camp,” while a third shows Japanese prisoners of war Kiichiro Hiranuma and Toshio Shiratori playing go and a fourth depicts prisoner of war Akira Muto playing go with rough pebbles on a paper board. Click here for background on the relocation and internment of approximately 110,000 Japanese nationals and Japanese Americans during World War 2. In 1988, Congress passed and President Ronald Reagan signed legislation apologizing for the internment on behalf of the U.S. government.
* the site where these photos were originally posted no longer exists; we’ve included new links for three of the four shots; if you locate the one of Akira Muto, please email us at journal@usgo.org

Categories: Go Photos,Go Spotting
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LIVE FROM JEONJU: Yuan Zhou on the 4th Annual Korea Prime Minister Cup

Monday November 2, 2009

By Yuan Zhou 7d
The matches at the just-concluded Korea Prime Minister Cup (KPMC) World Go Championship – the 4th annual — were very exciting, with representatives from 68 nations fighting hard for their countries. I was pleased to finish fifth, the best result yet for the United States in this tournament. Held in Jeonju, Korea, the hometown of famous world champion Lee Changho 9P, the event — which ran October 23-27 — is well organized by the Korean Baduk Association and a special bonus was that Lee Changho himself attended. My only losses were to the Korean representative (on right in photo), who won the championship this year, and the Chinese Taipei representative, a 1-dan professional who was allowed to play because he doesn’t officially become a pro until 2010. The match with the Korean representative was a very complicated game, and we were both down to our last byo-yomi period and one time we only had a couple seconds left on our clock. None of my games were easy, and the Europeans I played were all strong and played well. The New Zealand player I defeated in the last round would have placed 4th place if he had won; Canada’s Gangsheng Shi – this year’s Redmond Cup winner — did also did well, finishing in 8th place. 2009 KPMC World Go Championship official final result (top 16 finishers): 1. Korea; 2. China; 3. Chinese Hong Kong; 4. Japan; 5. USA; 6. Singapore; 7. Chinese Taipei; 8. Canada; 9. South Africa; 10. Thailand; 11. Ukraine; 12. New Zealand; 13. Slovenia; 14. Serbia; 15. France; 16. Netherlands. Click here for complete resultsPhoto: Yuan Zhou, US (left) and Song Hong-suk, Korea; group photo with Lee Changho 9p (center)

Categories: World
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In Memoriam: Andrew Grant

Monday November 2, 2009

UK go author and dan player Andrew Grant died in his sleep early on the morning of October 26. “Known throughout the world as the author of ‘400 Years of Go in Japan’, Andrew was well-known for 30 years on the tournament scene as a player and organizer, both at Wanstead and more recently, the Milton Keynes Go Club,” British Go Association Vice-President Tony Atkins tells the E-Journal. Grant had been suffering from cystic fibrosis, which had worsened over the last couple of years, and was on the waiting list for a lung transplant. “He had been in hospital for several weeks before his death,” says Tim Hunt, fellow Milton Keynes Club player, “and although struggling just to breathe, he was still a formidable opponent over the go board.”

Categories: Europe
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YOUR MOVE: Readers Write: Go For The Blind; Missing Meijin Game; Shibumi The Movie?; Finding Sunshine

Monday November 2, 2009

GO FOR THE BLIND: In response to a recent EJ classified inquiry about blind go, a reader referred us to the British Go Association’s Go for the Blind page, which contains information on playing blind go and pictures of special go sets.

MISSING MEIJIN GAME: “I’ve been studying the Meijin matches sent through the E-Journal for this year’s title,” writes reader David Lang. Is there a reason why the 5th match never came with the E-Journal? Perhaps I missed it.” See attached; click here to download all five Meijin games.

SHIBUMI THE MOVIE?: ”I was wondering if Shibumi the movie had ever been made,” writes Heidi. “I have a friend named after the character in that book, and I’d love to get him a copy for his birthday.” According to an undated entry on Trevanian.com. “Shibumi will be turned into a movie by Warners some time soon. The project is well advanced and filming will begin soon.” While the authoritative and comprehensive Internet Movie Database (IMDB) has no reference at all to a movie version of the novel, which features go-playing assassin Nicholas Hel, the New York Times website does, listing Keanu Reeves as playing Hel, Warner Brothers as the studio and five screenwriters but no director. All in all, a bit of a mystery. Trevanian – who died in 2005 – would have been pleased.

FINDING SUNSHINE: “Greetings from the Japan Alps national park,” writes Roger Schrag, Bay area go organizer. “Had a great evening with Kaz, what a truly nice guy! Visited Nihon Kiin, Sunshine Go Club, and Ueno Go Center.” Schrag will be in Japan for two more weeks and promises a full report upon his return. Meanwhile, here’s popular EJ contributor Kaz Furuyama’s directions to the Sunshine Go Club, which the EJ reported on back in May (THE TRAVELING BOARD: The Sunshine Go Club): the club is open from 12 noon to 9p weekdays and Saturday, and noon to 8p Sundays; the club is in Sunshine Building, a 60 story-building in Ikebukuro, “But inside the building, it’s rather tricky to get there,” Kaz says. “If you speak Japanese, you could ask a person at the information desk at Sunshine Building how to get there.” The club’s phone number is 03-3989-3515. email Kaz for further details at cickazu@gmail.com

INT’L TOURNEY REP ELIGIBILITY EXPLAINED

Monday November 2, 2009

“From time to time someone asks how the AGA selects players to attend international championship tournaments,” says Tournament Coordinator Phil Waldron. “Eligibility is not complicated, but it does require some planning.” To be eligible, players must be US citizens or Green Card holders and reside in the United States. “We also expect players to support the American go community and so players must have been a continuous member of the AGA over the past twelve months and have played at least ten rated games over the same time,” Waldron says. “Finally, potential competitors must meet any additional eligibility requirements set by the tournament sponsors; for example, you won’t be going to a youth event if you remember Woodstock.”  Full details about the various international tournaments and their selection tournaments can be found on the AGA Major Tournaments webpage.

Go School Updates

Monday November 2, 2009

Go teacher Joey Hung 7d is shuttering his Fremont, CA-area school “for a while” he tells the E-Journal, to focus on business opportunities. Meanwhile, Gabriel Benmergui 6d and Ali Jabarin 6d have just started up the online Atsumi Go School, which offers lessons, study groups and free game commentaries of games played between students. Benmergui is a top Argentinian player who has studied in Lee SangHun’s school, at Kim Sung-Rae 4p’s KBC school in Korea and represented Argentina at the World Amateur Go (WAGC) Championships and the World College Go Championship, where he defeated both Korean amateurs. Jabarin, Israeli champion for the last three years, placed 13th in the WAGC and represented Israel in the 2008 World Mind Sports Games, and is the current European Youth Champion.

US, Euro Player Databases Linked

Monday November 2, 2009

The new AGA Player Database and the European Go Database have now been cross-referenced with links for those players who have competed in events in both Europe and the United States. The new links are shown in the cards of players who are in both databases: a box appears with a link to the same player’s card in the “foreign” database. Currently, more than 300 players appear in both databases; examples include Ian Davis, Horst Sudhoff and Thomas Derz.

Cyprus Beckons

Monday November 2, 2009

With winter looming across North America and Europe, thoughts turn to the Cyprus Go Championship, as the leaves in that Mediterranean country change color in the Troodos mountains and vineyards take on gold and crimson hues against a backdrop of crystal clear sunlight and even November can feel like summer. The Cyprus Go Championship is set for November 21-22 in the Parnassos Strovolou building. Click here for details and to register.