American Go E-Journal » Search Results » learn go week

EUROPEAN GO NEWS: Trippel Takes Winterthur; Marigo Masters Italian Open; Krämer German Youth Champ; Ulster Sweeps Munster To Reach Irish Interprovincial Finals; Metta Sweeps Lucca; French Youth Congress And Hikaru Cup

Monday November 16, 2009

TRIPPEL TAKES WINTERTHUR: Lorenz Trippel of Zurich was undefeated in the one-day fast-play Swiss Winterthur tourney on November 14, ahead of Mark Wirdnam and Lisa Tao. Click here for results and photos.
- Peter Dijkema, after a report on swissgo.org

MARIGO MASTERS ITALIAN OPEN: Francesco Marigo 4d of Milan swept the 30th Italian Open (photo) field of 52 in Bologna, November 7-8. Only Massimiliano Spallanzi 12k from Modenaalso won all five rounds. Click here for results and photos.
- Peter Dijkema

KRÄMER GERMAN YOUTH CHAMP: Bonn’s Lukas Krämer 4d won the German Youth — Deutsche Jugendmeister — title in Hamburg on November 7-8. The event was hosted at the 27th “Rahlstedter Tengen,” which attracted over a hundred players to three different tourneys. In the traditional ‘Tengen’ events, Lutz Franke won Group One of 44 players on SOS ahead of Lu Ji and Stefan Kaitschick (also of Hamburg), while Björn Hölscher swept Group Two 7-0, topping a field of 50.
- Peter Dijkema

ULSTER SWEEPS MUNSTER TO REACH IRISH INTERPROVINCIAL FINALS: Ulster beat Munster on all three boards on November 13 in the Irish Go Association‘s new online interprovincial competition . This puts them through to the final, where they will play the winner of the Leinster – Connacht match. “The better team won” said Munster Team Captain Rory Wales. “It was a good hard match, and we’re just pleased to have got through it” responded Ulster Team Captain James Hutchinson. Munster clearly missed Cao Tong Yu 4d and Wei Wang 7d. Meanwhile, Colin MacSweeny and Michael Thai join Ian Davis and Noel Mitchell in the Top-8 tourney, which kicks off in January. The other four places will be filled from the ladder. “Intense competition can be expected for the rest of November”, according to the Irish Go Association.
- Ian Davis, Irish Correspondent, with additional reporting by Peter Dijkema

METTA SWEEPS LUCCA: Carlo Metta 1k of Pisa swept the Tai Kai Japan Palace tourney 5-0 in Lucca, Italy on October 31 and November 1. He finished ahead of Fausto Predieri (2nd) and Pasquale De Lucia (3rd). A week later, Metta surprised with silver at the 30th Italian Championship, as reported last week. Click here for results.
- Peter Dijkema, after a link on agi.go.it

FRENCH YOUTH CONGRESS AND HIKARU CUP: The French “Congres National des Jeunes” (right) – or Youth Congress — took place in a castle near Lens en Vercours in the Isereregion of the French Alps October 24-31. After four days of study with the team of teachers led by Fan Hui, students vied for the Hikaru Cups. French-American Thomas Debarre 5d once again won the top category “Lycée” while Florian Melcer won the “College” title and Mélissa Héaulme successfully defended her “Primaire” title, proving one can become a “Championne” starting simply by learning ‘atari-go.’ Héaulme’s father Alain is an active promotor of this teaching style in France. The report on the French site contains links to 5 YouTube videos.
- Peter Dijkema, after a report by Motoki Noguchi

Share
Categories: Europe
Share

Chapter News: Tacoma Club Teaches at Senior Center

Tuesday October 7, 2014

The Tacoma Go Club held its final event for the recent “Learn Go Week” on September 20 at the Agape Senior Center in Tacoma, Washington. “A great 2014.10.05_Tacoma-Steuernagle-Cruver-Castanza2014.10.05_Tacoma-Mowery-Warinersunny fall afternoon in the Pacific Northwest was enjoyed by newcomers to the newly opened senior center,” reports Tacoma Go Club president Gordon Castanza. After learning the basic rules of go on a 9 x 9 board, some of the fine points of the “Capture Game” were explained on a 19 x 19 demo board.
photo (l-r): Gordon Castanza, Ren Steuernagle , and Tom Cruver. At the end of the event, Reiko Mowery, President Agape Senior Group, and Rina Wariner, Executive Director Agape Senior Group treated the participants to tea and pastries.

Share
Categories: U.S./North America
Share

Ryan Li’s journey to the top 16 of the MLily Cup

Wednesday August 23, 2017

IMG_0616by Karoline Li

Official MLily Cup tournament festivities kicked off Tuesday (local time) in Tongling City with a welcome dinner attended by players and association officials. Ryan Li 1P and his partner Stephanie Yin 1P (photo at right) sat down to talk with AGA National Tournament Coordinator Jeff Shaevel (photo at left on the right) and I after dinner to discuss the upcoming match and Li’s journey to reach this moment. He was born in Beijing, and began playing go with his father around the age of five. He attended a go school a few times a week, and by the time his family moved to Canada at age eight, he had achieved amateur 4 dan status. After the move to Canada, he played mostly online. “He didn’t have a teacher,” Stephanie explained. “He practiced and learned on his own.” When I asked when he started competing seriously, he explained that for a while he only played in a few local tournaments in Ottawa, and his first big competition was the 2010 Canadian Open. “I took second to Matthew Hu,” Ryan says. “That was the year he became a professional.” He represented Canada in the Korean Prime Ministers Cup that year. “I didn’t do much between 2010 and 2012,” Ryan laughs. Then he joined the Pandanet AGA City League team captained by Cathy Li 1P, and was a North American representative to the first MLily Cup. He lost in the preliminaries of the MLily, but his City League team has won the championship three times out of five. He played in the second pro qualification tournament, then won the third tournament in 2015 becoming the fourth North American professional go player. Both tournaments were directed by Jeff Shaevel. “The tournament venue was in Boston right by the ocean, and it was beautiful,” Ryan remembered. “ “It was freezing!” Jeff laughed, and though Ryan agreed he viewed that as a positive. “Well I’m Canadian, so I like the cold.”

The last few years, Li has also been busy studying. He earned his bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Toronto, and became interested in atIMG_0662mospheric sciences after an internship with a professor who worked in the field. After earning his degree he went straight into a PhD program in the field at Yale University in New Haven, CT. “Does the logic for that fit with the logic of go?” Jeff asked. “I knew you were going to ask that,” Ryan laughed. “No, they don’t really go together.” Ryan explained that atmospheric sciences involves a lot of programming, data science, and theory. “Which is easier?” Jeff pressed. “Definitely go,” Ryan answered right away. “I really enjoy playing go,” he continued, his love of the game evident. “It started as a hobby, but after all these tournaments and becoming pro, it’s beyond a hobby, but it’s still fun. It’s one of the things I enjoy most.”

Li will face Li Xuanhao 6P on August 24th (local time), at 12:30pm in the top 16 match. He has prepared for this game for months by reviewing games and competing at the US Go Congress — where he went 8-1 and took second place in the Masters — in San Diego, and is excited for the match. “I have no secret weapon,” he said with a smile. “I’m just going to play my best and try to play move by move. At this point, I’m trying to relax.” He gives a lot of credit to Stephanie Yin, who has been helping him prepare for his matches and acting as his coach. Jeff smiled as Ryan talked about his preparations and his attitude towards tomorrow’s match. “This is such a proud moment for me,” Jeff beamed. “The pro qualifiers are a big deal for us, but we’re never sure what our pros will be doing after they qualify, and to see you playing in this tournament and doing so well is the most exciting thing. Whatever happens, I’m very, very proud.”
-report/photos by Li, EJ Tournaments Bureau Chief

Share

Ary Cheng 3-peats as Redmond Cup Junior Champion

Sunday August 20, 2017

20170810_16075111-year old Ary Cheng 6d (r) defeated 10-year old Matthew Cheng 5d (l) in the third and deciding game of the Redmond Cup Junior Division Finals Thursday August 10th at the 2017 US Go Congress to claim his third consecutive title.  While Matthew has been the only challenger so far to defeat Ary in his 3 consecutive Junior Finals, Ary has still established his dominance at the top of the Junior scene.  In addition to clinching the Redmond title with the final match, he also defeated Matthew in the US Open that same day. Taking black in game 3 of the Redmond, Ary was off to an early lead due to a joseki mistake by Matthew.  However, Matthew fought back strongly. While there were several opportunities for him to turn the game around, he wasn’t able to take full advantage of them and Ary seized victory. Ary and Matthew both took home trophies as well as $300 and $200 respectively. In addition, all of the Redmond Cup finalists also had all of their Congress expenses covered, courtesy of the AGF and AGA. Both kids still have at least one year left in the Junior Division (Under 13), so we can expect them to clash again in the near future and continue to develop as rising stars in the youth Go community. If you missed the game, you can check out the exciting live video commentary of the third game provided by 2005 Redmond Cup champions Zhaonian Chen 8d and Lionel Zhang 7d. Registration for next year’s tournament will open in early February 2018; check out the Redmond Cup page to learn more about the tournament and eligibility requirements.

Special thanks to Ashish Varma, Ethan Frank, and Dennis Wheeler for broadcasting the Redmond Cup Finals on KGS, and if you missed any of the video broadcasts, you can find them on the AGA’s Youtube channel. Stay tuned for highlighted videos of the commentaries; game records of all of the games will be uploaded on the Redmond Cup page within the next week. – Story and photos by Justin Teng, AGA Youth Coordinator

Share

Ryan Li 1P ready to face next opponent in the MLily top 16

Saturday August 19, 2017

IMG_4795Ryan Li 1P is gearing up for his next match in the  MLily Meng Baihe Cup World Go Open Tournament (MLily Cup), achieving his place in the top 16 after a stunning upset win against Chen Yaoye 9P (photo at right) in the last round on June 21st; see the story and game record here“My goal going into the match was to not let him win too easily,” Li (right) said of preparing for the June match with Chen. In an interview at the recent U.S. Go Congress, Li said that he was excited for the match against Chen as a learning opportunity since Chen is a world champion who had previously beaten Ke Jie 9P. During the match, there was a moment at the beginning of the endgame, after all the groups had been settled, when Li realized he could actually win. “He told me that it felt like his heart would pop out of his chest,” Stephanie Yin 1P said with a smile. Li remembers that his first professional go tournament was as an amateur player invited to participate in the MLily preliminaries in 2012 where he lost in the first round, and he characterizes his place in the top 16 of this year’s MLily as a life achievement. “I’ve always wanted to be in the top 16 in a professional go tournament,” he says. “I set that goal right before this tournament started, and it immediately happened. It’s just amazing.” Ryan Li is only the fourth professional go player to be certified by the AGA, winning the January 2015 pro certification tournament, and when not playing go, he is pursuing a PhD in atmospheric sciences at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

Li will face Li Xuanhao 6P in Tongling, Anhui on August 24th, and he used the 33rd US Go Congress as training to prepare for the match. He won eight of nine games in the US Open Masters Division, taking second place and losing only to tournament champion Wu Hao 2P of China. On top of his Go Congress training, he has been studying his opponents’ game records for the past year, and says Li Xuanhao’s style is calm; he expects playing against Li to be difficult, and not just because of his calm, solid style. “I know him pretty well,” Ryan says. “If I were playing someone else, I could review games with him and discuss strategy, but since he’s my opponent of course that would be awkward.” What is he most looking forward to? “I’m really looking forward to all the time before the match, because I’m still in the top 16 right now,” Ryan laughs. Stay tuned for our on-site coverage of the top 16 of the MLily Cup this week.

-report by Karoline Li, EJ Tournaments Bureau Chief; photo by Stephanie Yin 1P

Share

Yang Shuang 2P a hit at Northern VA summer camp

Sunday July 23, 2017

Yang Shuang 2P’s go class has been a big hit among kids attending the Hope Chinese School’s summer camp in Northern Virginia. In the first 2017.07.23_yang-nova-kidsweek of the 10-day program, two dozen students learned the basic s of the game, including liberties, how to capture, snap-backs, ladders, the double-atari, and life and death. Yang’s 2017.07.23_yang-nova-kids-closeinteractive teaching style has been effective at getting all the students involved, said camp director Dinny Li. “I am a bit surprised at how well kids respond to abstract go concepts taught by Ms. Yang,’ Li said. A leader at the Hope Chinese School and an advocate of go, Ms. Li thinks summer camp is a great place for kids to learn go.

Yang cofounded a go school in Shenyang, China over a decade ago. She has taught all levels, and will host a simul this Wednesday, July 26, 8p at the National Go Center in DC. She will also visit the NOVA Go Club next Monday, July 31, 7p in Arlington, VA and will be at the upcoming US Go Congress — August 5-12 — in San Diego.

The Hope Chinese School will continue offer afternoon go classes at the school’s summer camp August 14-25, where other Chinese arts will be offered, including fine art, music, kungfu. Contact 703-371-3414hcscamp.va@gmail.com

- reported by Edward Zhang

Share

Master takes on Park Junghwan and Meng Tailing in latest AGA Master Review Series

Sunday March 19, 2017

The latest in the AGA Master Review Series features Jennie Shen 2P’s translation of Meng Tailing 6p’s commentary on Master’s game against Park Junghwan 9p – Game 24 in Master’s 60-game series — and Michael Redmond 9P’s commentary on Master’s game against Meng Tailing (Game 9). At right is Redmond’s sgf commentary, which includes additional variations.

[link]

“I have taken note that some people are requesting longer videos in the comments, and I can assure you that in some cases I will be doing longer commentaries,” Redmond posted  last week. “In the case of the Master games, Master is outstanding in the opening, and the power of it’s different yet effective moves has the potential to change how we pros think about fuseki. One of my motives in making these videos was to voice my opinion about these new ideas, and therefore I want to focus on the early parts of the games. Master usually takes the lead early in the game, so that also is a factor in my choice to comment on the openings. I also believe that while I could squeeze in a lot of information, it can be difficult for the viewer to digest a lot of new ideas at once, and a large number of short videos is more effective as a learning tool than a small number of long videos.” Redmond added that “In my Redmond Reviews, I will be commentating more on human games, some of them my own. Humans make mistakes, which can be painful for the players but will give me more opportunities to go through to later stages in the games, and more drama late in the games for the viewers to enjoy.”

Share

Ye Breaks Through in WYGC

Saturday August 13, 2016

IMG_7137Aaron Ye 7d has finally broken the glass ceiling at the World Youth Goe Championships (WYGC) by becoming the first American player to place in the top three at the event.   Now in its 33rd year, the event has been run by the Ing Foundation for decades, and invites strong youth from all over the world to compete. Ye first attended the event in 2011, competing in the Jr. Division when he was just nine years old, and placing fourth overall.  Calvin Sun, now 1P, also competed in the event for years as a child, and had also placed fourth when he was 13 (on his sixth attempt).  China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan have shut everyone else out until this year, when Ye’s determination and effort finally paid off.  Now 14, Ye has been at the top of the US youth go scene for years, winning the Redmond Cup several times, and putting up a strong fight in the AGA pro certification leagues, as well as dominating other youth events and leading in many AGA tournaments.

The WYGC was held August 4th-7th in Tokyo this year, at the Nihon Kiin.  Ye reached the semi-finals by edging out Takei Taishen 7D of Japan by a hairs-breadth 3rd tier tie breaker (SOSODOS). After losing to the tournament’s champion Jiang Qirun 2P of China, Ye went on to take 3rd place by defeating Ahn Dongjun  5D of Korea. The USA junior player, nine-year-old Matthew Cheng 2d faced a tough choice this year, as he also won the Redmond Cup qualifiers and could have had a free trip to the US Go Congress to compete at the finals. Unfortunately, the WYGC and the Congress were both held the same week this year, so Cheng had to choose one over the other. Cheng did well at the WYGC though, “placing 7th in an outstanding performance by a player who learned go from a you-tube video a scant three years ago,” said Team Leader Mike Bull. Cheng also managed to draw matches with three of the four strongest players in his division in his first three games of the tournament. -Paul Barchilon, EJ Youth Editor, with Mike Bull. Photo by Abby Zhang: Ahn Dongjun 5d (l) vs. Aaron Ye 7d (r).

Share

Redmond Cup Player Profiles

Thursday July 28, 2016

With congress right around the corner, the 2016 finalists for the Redmond Cup are gearing up for the championship matches. The first match of both the Senior (under 18) and Junior (under 13) divisions will be broadcast on KGS, Sunday 8/1 at 3 pm EDT. The Senior Division Finals will also be live-streamed on the AGA’s Youtube channel with professional commentary from Jennie Shen 2p and Lionel Zhang 6d.  Tuesdays match will be commentated by Stephanie Mingming Yin 1p and Michael Chen 8d, if there is a third round in either division, Gansheng Shi 1p and Andrew Lu 7d will comment live on Thursday.  The player profiles below will help EJ readers know who is who.jeremy_chiu

Leading the Senior Division is 14-year-old Jeremy Chiu 6d, from San Jose, California. He is looking to win his first Redmond Cup title after being the runner-up in the Junior Division in 2014 and coming out in first place in this year’s Senior Division preliminaries. He first learned about go from his Chinese school when he was 5-years old, and started taking classes shortly thereafter. Currently, he studies with Mingjiu Jiang 7p, who has taught many other star US Youth players.  On Chiu’s own time, he does lots of tsumego and reviews professional games, along with playing and reviewing games on Tygem. Aside from go, he also enjoys playing the piano and violin, as well as swimming. When asked about his thoughts for the finals, Chiu told the EJ, “Albert is a very strong AlbertYenplayer, especially in the middle game, and I will need to be very careful. I hope that we will play good games in the finals.”

Albert Yen 7d, age 16, is from Chicago, Illinois, and is the defending champion in the Senior Division. He started playing go when he was 5 years old after watching Hikaru no Go and joining a local go club in Taiwan. Albert currently studies with Mingjiu Jiang 7p, and studies go by playing and reviewing slow, quality games when he has time.  Yen is also a star track-and-field hurdler at his high school. While Yen fell to Chiu in the preliminaries, Yen told the EJ, “I think our strengths are very close. I don’t want to do anything too different to prepare for the finals, so I will just remain cool and trust my abilities during the games.”

luoyi_yang

Luoyi Yang 4d, age 12 is from Toronto, Canada, and placed first in the Junior Division preliminaries this year. She started playing go at the age of 4 at a local go school in China, where she studied with Ding Lie 6p, Wang Xiangyun 2p, and Wang Chenfan 4p, two afternoons a week before moving to Canada this past year. Outside of playing go, she enjoys playing the piano and singing.AryCheng copy

Ary Cheng 4d, age 10, lives in Sunnyvale, California, and is the defending champion in the Junior Division. He started learning go at age 6 in a go class at a Chinese school, and was immediately drawn towards the game. Currently, he studies with Mingjiu Jiang 7p, and plays on IGS in addition to doing tsumego. When he is not playing go, he also enjoys playing table tennis. -Justin Teng, Redmond Cup TD.  Photos courtesy of the players.
Share

Evanston Hits Anime Convention

Friday May 27, 2016

EVANSTON PICMembers of the Evanston Go Club took the game of go to Anime Central last weekend, teaching hundreds of attendees how to play, reports club president Mark Rubenstein.  “This event is so much fun!” said Rubenstein. “We were there for 14 hours on Friday and 12 hours on Saturday, and we were teaching non-stop. I’m sure many of the kids we taught will continue to learn and play.”  Evanston Go Club has been teaching go for many years at ACEN, the largest anime convention in the midwest, with over 31,000 attendees last year.  “I think I’m finally catching up on my sleep now!” mused Rubenstein four days after the convention.

Share
Categories: U.S./North America
Share