American Go E-Journal » 2017 » October

Undeterred by hurricanes, Space Coast Go Tournament continues

Monday October 30, 2017

The 2017 Space Coast Go Tournament was held on October 14 in the Community Resource Center in Rockledge, Florida. Rockledge is on the2017.10.29 Space Coast collage mainland near the Kennedy Space Center and Cocoa Beach.  Last year Hurricane Matthew delayed the games; this year Hurricane Irma blew through earlier.  Rockledge suffered a large amount of mostly minor damage.

The three round tournament drew 16 players including folks from Orlando, Sarasota, Port Orange, and the Palm Beaches.  A wide range of ranks split nicely into three groups: Dans, 1 to 8 kyu, and 8 to 28 kyu.

Top honors went to Jonathan Fisher, 4D, who won all three of his games.  Aaron Otero was the winner of the upper kyu division, also with three wins.  Joel Kickbusch, 10k, won two out of three to finish first in the lower kyu division.  He also won the raffle for a new Go set generously donated by Yellow Mountain Imports along with other prizes.  The first three players in each division chose books from Slate and Shell as their prizes.  Bart Lipofsky was the tournament director.
- report/photos by Bart Lipofsky

Results:
Dan division: Jonathan Fisher, 4D (3-0), Chris Sagner, 3D (1,2), Karsten Henckell, 4D (1,2)
Upper kyu: Aaron Otero, 7k (3,0), Lanny Searcy,3k (2,1), Efrain Davila 2k (2,1)
Lower kyu: Joel Kickbush, 10k (2,1), Peyton Duncan, 28k (2,1), Yuliang Huang, 15k (2,1)

photos (clockwise, starting in upper left):
Karsten Henckell 4D (L) vs Jonathan Fisher 4D (R), Dan Micsa, 4D looks on from the side
Winners: (left to right) Jonathan Fisher, Aaron Otero, Joel Kickbusch, Peyton Duncan, Efrain Davila, Yuliang Huang, Chris Sagner
Joel Kickbusch 10k with Yellow Mountain Go set
Eddie Crawford 27k (L) vs Peyton Duncan 28k (R)

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Categories: U.S./North America
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“Surrounding Game” announces student discount

Monday October 30, 2017

Starting this month, students and university clubs are now eligible for a major student discount on screening packs of “The Surrounding Game2017.10.29_SurroundingGame screening pack documentary.

“We want to make it easy and affordable for campus groups to host screenings” says director Will Lockhart. “I think young people will enjoy the film more than anyone, and screening the film is an excellent way to interest new students in Go and Go clubs.” The screening pack includes several copies of the film, posters and flyers, and a custom 9×9 set, “perfect for teaching newcomers after the show,” notes Lockhart.

If you’d like to organize a screening of the film on your campus, check out the screening pack here, or contact the team for more information.

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The Power Report: Iyama defends Meijin, achieves second Grand Slam; Iyama makes good start in Oza; Iyama extends lead in Tengen; Yamashita makes Kisei playoff; Fujisawa evens score; First round completed in 73rd Honinbo League

Sunday October 29, 2017

by John Power, Japan Correspondent for the E-Journal2017.10.29_42 Meijin5 Iyama

Iyama defends Meijin, achieves second Grand Slam: The fifth game in the 42nd Meijin title match was held at the Atami Sekitei inn (below left), one of the traditional venues for the Meijin, in Atami City in Shizuoka 2017.10.29_43meijin5_8Prefecture on October 16 and 17. After winning the first game in the match, the defending champion, Takao Shinji Meijin, had lost three in a row, so he faced his first kadoban. The game got off to a stormy start, with Takao, who had white, capturing a large group of Iyama Yuta’s. Actually Iyama (right) could have made a second eye, but he didn’t like the result, so instead he discarded the group and tried to squeeze on the outside as compensation. As usual, it was a fierce game, and the lead switched back and forth. In the end, Iyama set up a ko to kill the white group surrounding his “captured” group, and Takao had to resign when he ran out of ko threats.

2017.10.29_42meijin5 TakaoLosing this title to Takao (left) last year cost Iyama his simultaneous grand slam, the first in Japanese go history. In the meantime, he defended his other six titles, so regaining the Meijin gave him his second grand slam, a first for. This is a first for go or shogi. Iyama maintained the first one for 197 days. Fans will be looking forward to his extending this. This is his 46th title, which leaves him in sixth place, one behind Kato Masao.

This success earned Iyama a report in the nightly news, which also revealed in passing that his tournament prize money now amounted to 1,000 million ten (about $9 million).

Iyama makes good start in Oza: Just three days after regaining his grand slam, Iyama was busy with maintenance, meeting the challenge of Ichiriki Ryo 7P for the 65th Oza title. The first game was played at the Yokohama Royal Park Hotel in Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, on October 20. Iyama drew white. The game started with a fierce struggle for the initiative, and fighting continued to the end. Iyama was able to take an edge, leading Ichiriki to resign after 168 moves. The second game is scheduled for November 18.1 Oza1 Ichiriki right

Iyama extends lead in Tengen: The second game of the 43rd Tengen title match was played at the Hotel Emisia Sapporo in Sapporo City, Hokkaido, on October 27. Taking white, Iyama Yuta secured a resignation after 162 moves, making the game almost the same length as the Oza one reported above. Ichiriki Ryo (right) faces his first kadoban in the third game, scheduled for November 24. As least he has the better part of a month to consider how to righten his ship in his double challenge.

Yamashita makes Kisei playoff: The third game in the knock-out to decide the challenger in the 42nd Kisei tournament was played on October 27. Motoki Katsuya 8P had done well, moving up from bottom of the knock-out, as C League winner, past the B and C League winners, but his run came to a stop when he met Yamashita Keigo 9P, second-place-getter in the S League. Taking black, 2017.10.29_female-honinbo2 FujisawaYamashita won by resig. He will meet Ichiriki in the final, though the latter starts with a one-win advantage.

Fujisawa evens score: The second game of the 36th Women’s Honinbo title match was held at the Izanro Iwasaki inn in2017.10.29_female-honinbo2 Izanro Iwasaki_8 the town of Miasa in Tottori Prefecture (at right, with the Mitoku River flowing in front of it). Taking black, Fujisawa Rina (left), the defending champion, forced Xie Yimin, the challenger, to resign after 205 moves. This evened the score at 1-1. The third game will be played on November 4.

First round completed in 73rd Honinbo League: With the two results given below, the first round of the new league has now been completed. Of the four newcomers to the league, only Ida Atsushi has won a game. Besides the players below, Motoki Katsuya and Yamashita Keigo have won a game. The others to have lost a game are Kobayashi Satoru and Shibano Toramaru.
(Oct. 19) Ko Iso 8P (W) beat Yo Seiki 7P by resig.
(Oct. 26) Ida Atsushi 8P (W) beat Hane Naoki 9P by 3.5 points.

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Categories: Japan,John Power Report
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AlphaGo-AlphaGo Game 13: The large knight’s move enclosure workout

Sunday October 29, 2017

“This is a very different game, in that there are three corner enclosures,” says Michael Redmond 9p in his game commentary on AlphaGo-2017.10.27_AG-13AlphaGo Game 13. “Black isn’t playing a kakari, which is different from what human players do now. So we’re going to have kind of a workout in how to deal with the large knight’s move enclosure.”

Click here for Redmond’s video commentary, hosted by the AGA E-Journal’s Chris Garlock.

The Game 13 video is produced by Michael Wanek and Andrew Jackson. The sgf file was created by Redmond, with editing and transcription by Garlock and Myron Souris.

[link]

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Grandmaster Morozevich on go, computers and cheating

Sunday October 29, 2017

Alexander Morozevich was once live-rated world no. 1, but at the age of 40 the Russian grandmaster has dropped to world no. 79 and barely2017.10.29_morozevich-barsky plays classical events, reports chess24. In a recent interview he talked about what he’s currently up to, explaining his fascination with go and how he’s watched as computers have conquered that game just as they did chess during his career. “I see very similar processes in what Go is going through and what happened in chess 10-15 years ago…For now it’s not quite formalised, but gradually, I think, they’ll follow the same path that we followed in chess.” In the article, Morozevich also talks about what he sees as the chess world’s reluctance to take cheating seriously, despite computer “doping” being so much more powerful than drugs in other sports.

 

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Categories: Computer Go/AI
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Young Lions Registration Open

Thursday October 26, 2017

DSC00509Registration for the annual Young Lions Tournament is now open through November 26th. This American Go Honor Society organized tournament welcomes youth players under the age of 18 (who have not yet graduated high school) to compete in an online tournament. The tournament will be held on December 3rd and December 10th in the AGHS Tournament Room on KGS. There will be four rounds in total, two on each day, but players are not required to play all four rounds. Additionally, prizes will be given to winners of each division. To view the rules, click here; and to register, click here. -Gabriella Su, AGHS Promotion Head. Photo by Paul Barchilon

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Inaugural Latin American Go Congress sparkles in Cancun

Wednesday October 25, 2017

Known worldwide for sparkling beaches and water, these attractions were but a pretty side element at the first Latin American Go Congress in Cancun, Mexico from October 13th to 15th. Sixty-four players from 15 countries played in the six-round 19th Ibero American Go 2017.10.25_Latin American Go CongressChampionship (CIG). After a slightly delayed start on the first day (familiar to many U.S. Go Congress participants), TD Milosh Trnka Rodriguez kept the McMahon event moving smoothly. Time limits were short to fit two rounds each day before lunch – generally 35 minutes per player plus 5 x 30 overtime. The overall winner was Kim Hyuneoo of Korea. The Ibero Championship (limited to citizens of the Ibero-American member states) was won by Fernando Aguilar 7d (below left) of Argentina, the perennial top player from the region.

The first Latin American Youth Go Championship was run by Siddhartha Avila of Mexico and had 16 players from six countries divided in two categories. Division A was won by Soomin Oh 2d from Korea and in Division B Shanti Ramírez 12 kyu from Mexico came out on top. In the first Pandanet Go Latin American Team Championship (PGLATC) Mexico bested guest Argentina in a 3-board match with a 2-1 score.

With generous international support, six pros attended: Enda Hideki 9P and Komatsu Daiki 2P from Japan; Cho Hye-yeon 9P and Youngshin Lee 5P from Korea; Mateusz Surma 1P from the European Go Federation; and Eric Lui 1P from the AGA with funding provided by the American Go Foundation. After the main games, the pros provided quick game analysis and each afternoon half of the players took on the pros in simuls. Few of the amateurs won!

aguilar_DSC0186There were lectures on pros games (including an especially lively one analyzing a victory over a fellow 9P by Cho Hye-yeon, 9P) and sessions on teaching go by a leading Korean expert from KIBA, Mr. Kwon Kapyong 8P. And, of course, there was lots of casual play and discussion of games whenever players sat around a board.

The evening events included Crazy Go (with 19 variants) on Friday night run by AGF President Terry Benson. Rengo Kriegspiel was run for the first time in Spanish. As usual, everybody won. On Saturday evening, The Surrounding Game film was screened.
Each of the three evenings included a round of the second Ibero-American Pair Go Championship – with many of the pros and the Congress Director playing – won by Samy Suastegui, 8k of Mexico and Youngshin Lee, 9P of Korea.
The Emporio hotel provided a classy setting for the event. There was an included opening dinner at the hotel, box lunches each day, and plenty of coffee and water. The closing dinner at Porfirios had a classic Mexican atmosphere – good food and mariachi music. There was even a little impromptu singing of Go songs. And a new one – in Spanish – written by Benson and Ester Monroy added to the canon.
Funding for the event came from the International Go Federation, Pandanet, Nihon Ki-in, Korean Baduk Association, American Go Association, American Go Foundation, and Mexico’s National University UNAM.

The Mexican Go Association Congress team led by Emil Garcia and including Marco Hernandez, Temilotzin Ibarra, Ester Monroy, Dafne Rios, with additional support from UNAM students staff and media team gave a good start to the tradition of Latin American Go Congresses.
The site of the 2018 event will be announced before the end of the year with Bogota, Colombia and Buenos Aires, Argentina the likely candidates. For those who like an international Congress diet, there is a new hearty entrée on the menu.
- report/photos by Terry Benson

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Mark Lee wins 3rd Cotsen title

Sunday October 22, 2017

Sweeping all five games, Mark Lee (left, with Eric Cotsen) won his third consecutive Cotsen Open title October 22 at the Korean Culture Center in Los 2017.10.22_cotsen-MarkLee-awardAngeles. All five wins were by resignation, including the exciting Round 4 game Sunday morning against Mateusz Surma. The European professional fell behind early but made skillful use of two weak groups to generate a thrilling game for viewers watching live on KGS as Surma chased a one-eyed dragon across the board. “Mateusz’ attack was a bit stronger than I expected,” said Lee. “I met him four years ago when we studied at the same school and he’s improved a lot since then.” See below for the game record, with commentary and variations by Lee.
Lee donated his $1,000 prize to the American Go Foundation, “to support its work training a new generation of go players.”

Winner’s Report:
Open: Mark Lee (5-0), Aaron Ye (4-1), Andrew Lu (4-1), Xiaocheng Hu (4-1), Mateusz Surma (3-2), Daniel Liu (3-2)
2-4d: Tyler Oyakawa (5-0), Jinming Pan (4-1), Pei Guo (4-1)
1d-2k: Kim In (4-1), Jay Chan (4-1), Irving Lai (4-1)
3k-7k: Matthew Hecht (4-1), Barnett Yang (4-1), Jonathan Zhang (4-1)
8k-19k: Heung Suh (5-0), Choashane Chang (4-1), Zongren Huang (4-1)
20-30k: Xiang Cai (5-0), Kyungsoo Lim (4-1), Alex Ledante
Club prizes: 1st: Santa Monica, 2nd: Orange County; 3rd: San Diego
- report/photo by Chris Garlock

[link]

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Mark Lee goes for “three-peat” at Cotsen Open

Saturday October 21, 2017

To say that defending Cotsen Open champion Mark Lee dominated his opponents in the first three rounds Saturday would not do justice to2017.10.21_MarkLee-right Lee’s play. “This is a slaughter,” said one viewer on KGS as Lee (right) effortlessly erased Daniel Liu’s (left) territory, leaving the 5-dan’s groups struggling pointlessly in Round 2. In the first round, Wang Yi 5d attacked Lee strongly, but was forced to resign after just 134 moves when his eyeless group came up short against Lee’s one-eyed group. In the third round, Aaron Ye, in a tenacious display of fighting spirit, threw everything he had at Lee — despite the relentless pressure of the overtime clock — but was unable to find a way to victory and, like Liu and Yi, was forced to resign.

Lee’s sweep Saturday puts him in position to capture the title for the third year in the final two rounds on Sunday, although Poland’s Mateusz Surma, also 3-0, may have something to say about that. Surma was just in Mexico for the Mexican Go Congress and decided to come up for the Cotsen. The top-board games will be broadcast live on KGS, and see photos on Twitter @theaga.

- report/photo by Chris Garlock

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Seattle Go Center Celebrates 22nd Anniversary

Saturday October 21, 2017

Playing Beat the KyuNick presenting Beat the Kyu A rousing game of “Beat the Kyu”, led by famous YouTube instructor Nick Sibicky, was the highlight of the 22nd Anniversary Party at the Seattle Go Center on Sunday October 15. Sibicky teaches at the Go Center on Monday nights.  In “Beat the Kyu,” the group reviews a kyu level game together. After each move is made, members have the opportunity to score points by finding a better move than the kyu player did.   Sibicky brought his charming son Beckett along, who provided additional commentary.  About 30 people came to the party, which also included good food, wine and beer, and casual games.  Report /photos by Brian Allen.

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