American Go E-Journal » 2019 » June

Upcoming Go Events: Lexington, Washington, Ontario, Sacramento

Monday June 17, 2019

June 22: Lexington, MA
2019 Greater Boston Youth & Pair Go Tournament
Ke Lu ke.lu@crl.com 781-296-7519
Emma Fang tingfang2013@gmail.com 617-888-5842

June 22: Washington, DC
NGC Congress Tune-up
Gurujeet Khalsa gurujeet.khalsa@nationalgocenter.org 703-626-0777

June 28-July 1: Hamilton, Ontario
42nd Canadian Go Open
Nicholas Prince nickprince@gmail.com

June 29: Sacramento, CA
Davis/Sacramento Summer Quarterly
Willard Haynes cwillardhaynes2@gmail.com 916-929-6112 or 916-601-0829

Get the latest go events information.

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2019 Orlando Go Tournament report

Wednesday June 12, 2019

The Orlando Go Tournament was held June 1st and 2nd. Fifteen players and five matches over the two days included lots of re-connecting with old friends, laughter and serious playing. The first day went by too fast, and left everyone wanting more. Second day started off with dad jokes and puns, helping the players relax before their last two matches. In the end, the results were separated into two groups; the first was 6 kyu to 7 dan and the second group was 20kyu to 7kyu.

The results were as follows:

First group winner was Efrain Davila, followed by Brian Olive, Rab Beverly, Alex Blair, Chris Sagner, Xinpeng Du and Yoshio Tanaka.

Second group winner was Heather Crawford, followed by Phillip Brix, Benjamin Potter, Bart Lipofsky, Paul Wiegand, Eric Crawford, Berto Roe, and Emily Scherer.

Overall, everyone had a good time, and we are looking forward to more events later this year!

  • report/photos by Chris Sagner
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AlphaGo vs. AlphaGo; Game 31: AG’s refutation of the Chinese Opening

Tuesday June 11, 2019

After a two-month hiatus for travel and other projects, Michael Redmond 9P and Chris Garlock have returned with their latest AlphaGo vs. AlphaGo game commentary, Game 31 of the series. “Black plays the Chinese Opening, which was very popular before AlphaGo,” Redmond says, “but because of a move AlphaGo came up with as White, it’s not as popular now. After that, we get to see Black doing neat attacks, and White ignoring them; business as usual, you could say.”

[link]

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Jeff Kuang tops NC Spring tourney

Tuesday June 11, 2019

Two dozen go players enjoyed stimulating competition in the North Carolina Annual Spring tournament on Sunday, May 19th. After four rounds of well-matched games the following winners were noted: in the top band, Jeff Kuang won all of his games and claimed the top prize; second place was a tie between Ji Wen and Haixin Yang, each with a 3-1 record and identical SOS scores. Band 2 was won by Tao Ma with a 3-1 record; Charles Alden placed second with a 2-2 performance and the highest SOS score, edging out the other 2-2 winners in that section, Jim Conyngham and Justin Blank. Russell Herman was the clear winner in Band 3 with the only other perfect 4-0 record of the day, and Will Daland claimed 2nd place as his SOS score placed him slightly higher than the other 2-2 performers, Ganning Xu, Dale Blann and Bhaskar Bharath. John Schollenberger won 3 of 4 games to lead the pack in Band 4, with Sky Wang placing second. The tournament was attended by many supportive parents, and we greatly appreciate their support. Jeff Kuang was the Tournament Director. Lunch was provided onsite by the Triangle Go Group. The beautiful playing area was provided courtesy of Triangle Go Group member Dale Blann. Thank you, Jeff and Dale!
-reported by Jeff Kuang, Tournament Director

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Eric Lui evens score to 3-3 in Transatlantic Team Championship

Tuesday June 11, 2019

Eric Lui 1P defeated Pavol Lisy 2P by 1.5 points in the 6th round of the Transatlantic Professional Go Team Championship played June 9 on OGS.

Lisy (Black) took an early advantage by capturing white’s group on the lower side. When white attempted to reduce black’s moyo on the top, black chose an aggressive strategy, leading to a critical ko in the center. The game seemed clearly in black’s favor when black’s group lived in the upper-left corner. But, pressed by byo-yomi, Lisy didn’t realize his group was already alive, and missed a chance to solidify his advantage. The game became close as white captured a small black group in the center, but black was still leading by a narrow margin. Black’s final mistake was move 217, which allowed white to start an advantageous ko. White gained a few points from this ko fight, and managed to finish the game 1.5 points ahead.

The next round will take place on June 30, starting at 14:00 US Eastern time. Artem Kachanovskyi 2P will challenge Eric Lui. The game will be played on OGS and live-streamed on Twitch.

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AGA candidates coming forward in all regions

Friday June 7, 2019

Current candidates are Chris Kirschner in the western, Steve Colburn in the eastern, and Devin Fraze in the central region. If you know of someone who you believe would offer guidance and service to the AGA consider making a nomination. Nominations, including self-nominations may be made by full members for the region in which the member resides and must be received by June 15, 2019. Nominations and questions must be emailed to elections@usgo.org. Click here for complete election information and qualifications.

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China’s half-point victory clinches win in 2019 World Amateur Go Championships; U.S. places 4th, Canada 6th

Friday June 7, 2019

Wang Chen, China’s representative to the 2019 World Amateur Go Championship edged out his Korean rival Lee Jaesong in a tense half-point game to take top honors, while the US player, Albert Yen, and Canadian Wu Qi You scored outstanding results at 4th and 6th place respectively. Along with Hungarian Pal Balogh in 5th and Ukrainian Dmytro Bogatskyi in
7th, half of the top eight finishers were from outside Asia. Third place went to Chan Nai San of Hong Kong and 8th to Kawaguchi Tsubasa of Japan.

Full results are here. Wang went undefeated in the eight-round, four-day event in Matsue City, Shimane Prefecture, Japan, securing the win at the end of the day three when he beat Lee. It was Lee’s only defeat.

Both players started the game very steadily, taking few risks, and in fact there was very little fighting at any point in the game. When white played the shoulder hit of 60, black opted to link his stones on the upper side with 61, but then white’s capture of 62–68 gave white a locally favorable result. Following that, white kept the game in his grip, and even with the successful invasion of black 121, etc., white was favored for the win. The decisive fight broke out with black 145. White’s defense was solid and, up to 175, he still held the lead. However, white 180 let black complicate the situation, when a jump at around f10 would have been good enough. White 186 is probably the losing move: black 187 captured six stones in the center, and although white could then return to capture four black stones with 194, black had profited slightly from the whole exchange. The rest of the endgame was played precisely by both sides, and it does not look like there was a way for white to avoid a half-point loss.

Among the players who won six of their eight games, the Hong Kong player benefited from having played the top four starters and defeating two of them, while Albert Yen lost only to China and Korea.

The Asada Shizuo Fighting Spirit special prize, awarded to the player who best shows good manners and sportsmanlike conduct, was given to Singaporean Kwa Jie Hui, who placed ninth. While Kwa’s award may have been given for his generous response to a clock mishap in his game with Japan, discussion at the playing site also noted his patient demeanor in the face of fearsome pairings. Kwa played against all of the top six starters, China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan, a French 7-dan, and a German 6-dan, and still came in 5–3. He also represented Singapore in 2018 and played against China, Korea, Taiwan, and strong players from Russia,
Canada, and Finland, similarly scoring 5–3.
– reported by Andy Okun; commentary by Antti Törmänen

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Eric Lui scores second win in Transatlantic Team Championship

Sunday June 2, 2019

In round five of the Transatlantic Professional Go Team Championship, played on June 2, Eric Lui 1P defeated EGF pro Ali Jabarin 2P. The game was followed live by over 300 players on OGS and 4,000 viewers on Twitch.
The game intensified as Ali (white) invaded black’s large moyo on the right side. A white group on the right appeared dead for some time, leading viewers to believe the game would be over soon. Yet, to everyone’s surprise, including main commentator Inseong Hwang, Ali magically found a way to save the group. However, in the process, white had to leave the center undefended, and black’s center territory became too large for white to match. At the final count, black won by 24.5 points.

The next round will take place on June 9, starting at 14:00 US Eastern time. Eric Lui will face Pavol Lisy 2P. The game will be played on OGS and live-streamed on Twitch.
– Hajin Lee

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