American Go E-Journal » 2021 » September

10th Virginia Open to be held online next month

Tuesday September 28, 2021

The 10th Virginia Open is scheduled to take place online Oct. 9-10 and Oct. 16-17, with a total cash prize pool of about $600.  Award certificates, participation certificates and cash prizes are offered to six divisions: Open Elite, Open, Expert, Proficient, Intermediate and Novice. Youth and female top performers in various divisions will also be recognized. Non-Virginia players can also play. Click here to register. Click here to view the 2020 VA Open Winners Report. Based on the 10th VA Open standings, the 3rd Virginia State Championship will invite four Virginia players to a knockout tournament later in 2021, and two youth players and two female players to compete for Virginia youth champion and women’s champion. The tournament, hosted by the Virginia chapter clubs of the AGA, will be held in the OGS Baduk Club. Registration fee is $10 for AGA members and $20 for non-members.

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The Power Report: Snap inspections planned by the Nihon Ki-in; Upcoming book: “Fuseki Revolution: How AI Has Changed Go”; Promotions; Obituary

Tuesday September 28, 2021

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Snap inspections planned by the Nihon Ki-in
On Sept. 16, the Nihon Ki-in decided that in order to maintain the fairness of official tournaments, it would hold snap, unannounced inspections of the personal belongings of players engaged in official games. Led by a member of the board of directors, officials would make a temporary halt to play in a specified area (such as one floor) and examine players’ belongings. Any players with devices with communication functions would forfeit their games, and their names would be made known within the Ki-in. Any players refusing to permit an inspection of their belongings would be treated in the same way.
Some background: As of October 1, 2018, Nihon Ki-in players were forbidden to take electronic devices into playing areas, being required to put them into lockers. As of Jan. 1 this year, players were forbidden to leave the playing area at meal times. A portion of playing areas were set aside as rest areas, and rest rooms were included in the playing area. (See my report of Feb. 25, 2021.)

Upcoming book: “Fuseki Revolution: How AI Has Changed Go”
A book on the influence of AI on go theory will be published soon by Kiseido. The title is “Fuseki Revolution: How AI Has Changed Go” and the author is Shibano Toramaru. (Full disclosure: I am the translator.)

Promotions
To 9-dan: Katayama Yasuo (200 wins; as of Sept. 17). Katayama is a member of the Nagoya (Central Japan) branch of the Nihon Ki-in. He was born on July 28, 1964 and became 1-dan in 1981. His career score is 491 wins to 471 losses, 11 jigo and 1 no-contest. It’s interesting to see that the 200 wins required for promotion to 9-dan make up just over 40% of all his lifetime wins.  To 8-dan: Mitani Tetsuya (150 wins; as of Sept. 17). His lifetime tally is 330 wins to 216 losses and 2 no-contests. The wins for his latest promotion are just 27% of his career wins.  
To 7-dan (120 wins): Kobayashi Izumi (as of Aug. 17); Ohashi Hirofumi (as of Aug. 17); Xie Yimin (as of Aug. 20)
To 2-dan (30 wins): Ikemoto Ryota (30 wins; as of Aug. 6); Kondo Toshiki (as of Sept. 7)

Obituary
Saijo Masataka 9-dan died on August 6. Born on Jan. 5, 1941 in Chiba Prefecture, Saijo became a disciple of Sakai Yasuo 8P. He became 1-dan at the Central Japan (Nagoya) branch of the Nihon Ki-in in 1964 and reached 8-dan in 1981. He retired in 2004 and was promoted to 9-dan. Saijo made many trips overseas to teach go and in particular was a familiar face at the European Go Congress for many years.

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Categories: Japan,Main Page
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The Power Report: Sumire’s progress; Most wins; Most successive wins; Kiyonari reaches 1,000 wins

Monday September 27, 2021

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Sumire’s progress
(August 2) Sumire (B) beat Antii Tormanen 1P by 6.5 points (Prelim. C, 48th Tengen tournament).
(Aug. 5) Sumire (W) lost to Muramatsu Daiki 6P by resig. (Prelim. A, 60th Judan tournament).
(Aug. 12) Sumire (B) lost to Suzuki Ayumi 7P by 3.5 points (round 2, main tournament, 6th Senko Cup)
(Aug. 19) Sumire (B) lost to Abe Yoshiki 3P by resig. (C League, 46th Kisei tournament). This was her third loss, so Sumire dropped out of the league.
(Aug. 26) Sumire (B) lost to Iguchi Toyohide 8P by 3.5 points. (Prelim. C, 48th Tengen tournament).
(Aug. 30) Sumire beat Kato Tomoko 6P (Prelim. A, Women’s Kisei). This win secured a seat in the main tournament (the top 16). (= 31-13)
(Sept. 2) Sumire beat Komatsu Hideko 4P (Prelim. C, 70th Oza tournament).

Most wins
As usual, we give this list after the Sumire update, as it shows how well she and other female players are doing. There are five women in the top ten.
1. Ueno Asami, Women’s Kisei: 39-18
2. Nakamura Sumire 2P: 34-14
3. Fukuoka Kotaro 2P: 32-9
4. Kyo Kagen Judan: 30-12
5. Seki Kotaro 7P: 29-9; Motoki Katsuya 8P: 29-12
7. Fujisawa Rina, Women’s Honinbo: 28-10
8. Tsuneishi Takashi 4P: 27-6; Ichiriki Ryo Tengen: 27-9
10. Nyu Eiko 3P: 26-13; Xie Yimin 7P: 26-16
12. Iyama Yuta Kisei: 24-11; Shibano Toramaru Oza: 24-17

Most successive wins
8: Kyo Kagen
7: Seki Kotaro
6: Fujisawa Rina
The above winning streaks are ongoing. Onishi Kenya had a streak of 7 that stopped last week.

Kiyonari reaches 1,000 wins
Kiyonari Tetsuya 9-dan of the Kansai Ki-in scored his 1,000th official win on August 4. His record at that point was 1,000 wins to 514 losses, a winning rate of 64%. He is the 29th Japanese player to reach this mark and the 6th at the Kansai Ki-in. Kiyonari will turn 60 on November 27, so a professional mile stone is being closely followed by a personal one.  Kiyonari took second place in the NHK Cup in 1995. He won the Kansai Ki-in No. One Position title twice. He also came second in the King of the New Stars in 1980. His predecessors at the Kansai Ki-in are: Hashimoto Shoji, Honda Kunihisa, Yuki Satoshi, Imamura Toshiya, and Sonoda Yuichi.

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50 Years aGO – September 1971

Saturday September 25, 2021

by Keith L. Arnold, hka, with Patrick Bannister

Two early matches in the TV tournaments attracted attention because of interesting match ups. First, on September 5, Kitani Reiko 6d, daughter of the great Kitani Minoru (and future wife of Kobayashi Koichi and mother of Kobayashi Izumi) upset Takagawa Shukaku 9d in the 4th Quick Go Tournament. (Game record: Kitani-Takagawa.)

Second, on September 12, the new Hon’inbo Ishida Yoshio faced off against the legendary Go Seigen in the 19th NHK Tournament. Go Review remarked that Go “overwhelmingly defeated” the young star. See for yourself in the game record: Go-Ishida.

But the month was dominated by Rin Kaihō’s attempt to get the Meijin title back from Fujisawa Shūkō. The second game was postponed for a day due to the title holder’s health and he lost the game to go down 0-2. Shūkō then came back to win the 3rd and 4th games, played from September 9 to 10 and September 17 to 18 respectively, to even the series. But we offer a photo of a smiling Rin after his victory in the 5th game, played from September 27 to 28, to lead the series 3-2. (Game records: Game 2, Game 3, Game 4, Game 5.)

Kitani Reiko wins Hayago tournament game against Takagawa Shukaku

Image 1 of 3

Photos courtesy of Go Review

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The Power Report: Fujisawa wins Senko Cup; The 79-year age gap; New Honinbo league members; Three-way tie in international tournament; Shin Jinseo wins Chunlan Cup

Thursday September 23, 2021

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Fujisawa wins Senko Cup
The final rounds of the 6th Senko Cup were held in the Guest Pavilion Akekure (Dawn and Dusk) at the Crefeel Koto hotel in East Omi City, Shiga Prefecture, on September 10 and 12. This tournament is a little unusual in that the previous winner does not defend the title but starts out again in the main tournament. The winner of the 5th Cup was Ueno Asami; she reached the final, so the result was the same as if she were defending the title. She was joined in the final by her main rival, Fujisawa Rina. The latter prevailed in the final, so she won this title for the third time. First prize is 8,000,000 yen (just under $73,000 at $1 = 109.62 yen), which makes this the most lucrative domestic female title. Second prize of 4,000,000 yen is also quite generous. Fujisawa now holds five of the six women’s titles, the other four being the Women’s Honinbo, the Women’s Meijin, the Women’s Hollyhock, and the Hakata Kamachi Cup. The lone hold-out is the Women’s Kisei, held by Ueno. Fujisawa also holds the Young Carp title. This is her 19th title; she is rapidly catching up with XieYimin (27 titles).

Results:
Semifinals (Sept. 10). Ueno Asami (B) beat Xie Yimin 7P by resig.; Fujisawa (B) beat Suzuki Ayumi 7P by resig.
Final (Sept. 12). Fujisawa (W) beat Ueno by resig.

The 79-year age gap
On September 9, Sugiuchi Kazuko 8P, at 94 the oldest active go player, was paired against Fukuoka Kotaro 2P, at 15 one of the youngest professionals at the Nihon Ki-in. The gap between the two was 79 years. Taking black, Fukuoka won by resignation. After the game, he commented: “Sugiuchi Sensei’s posture and movements were very natural and struck me as beautiful. I’m glad I had a chance to play her.’ The biggest gap ever in a professional game was 80 years, set when her husband, the late Sugiuchi Masao, then 95, played Onishi Ryuhei 1P, then 15.

New Honinbo league members
The four vacant seats in the 77th Honinbo League have been decided, and two have gone to Kansai Ki-in players. On August 26, Sada Atsushi 7P (KK) (W) beat Koyama Kuya 4P by 2.5 points. Sada makes a comeback to the league immediately after dropping out of the previous league.
On September 2, Yo Seiki 8P (KK) (W) beat Ko Iso 9P by resig. and won a seat for the sixth time after a gap of two terms. On the same day, Motoki Katsuya 8P (W) beat Koike Yoshihiro 6P by resig. This will be his fourth appearance in the league; he won the 72nd league.
In the game for the last open seat, played on September 9, Tsuruyama Atsushi 8P (B) beat Anzai Nobuaki 7P by resig. Tsuruyama also made an immediate come back to the league. He commented that he was happy to make his second league; one appearance could be dismissed as a fluke, but not two.

Three-way tie in international tournament
The 2021 6th Hulu Island Weiqi Cultural Festival China-Japan-Korea Tournament was held from September 12‾14 on the net. It is a team tournament, with three-player teams from China, Japan, and Korea competing. It features former top players, though one member of the Japanese team might object to the first adjective. Each team won one match and lost one and each scored three individual wins, so the result was a three-way tie for first. Chinese rules were used, and the time allowance was one hour plus one minute x 5. Prizes were 300,000 yuan (about $18,450 at one yuan = 15.3 cents), 200,000, and 100,000. Results follow:

Round One) Korea 2-China 1
Yoo Chang-hyeok 9P (B) lost to Yu Bin 9P by half a point.
Lee Chang-ho 9P (B) beat Chang Hao 9P by resig.
Cho Hun-hyeon 9P (B) beat Nie Weiping 9P by resig.

Round Two) China 2-Japan 1
Nie Weiping 9P (W) lost to Kobayashi Koichi 9P by resig.
Yu Bin (B) beat Kobayashi Satoru 9P by resig.
Chang Hao 9P (W) beat Takao Shinji 9P by half a point.

Round Three) Japan 2-Korea 1
Kobayashi Koichi (W) beat Cho Hun-hyeon by 4.5 points.
Kobayashi Satoru (B) beat Yoo Chang-hyeok by resig.
Takao Shinji 9P (B) lost to Lee Chang-ho by 2.5 points

Shin Jinseo wins Chunlan Cup
Shin Jin-seo 9P of Korea, the world’s top-rated player, beat Tang Weixing 9P of China 2-0 in the best-of three final of the 13th Chunlan Cup (the tournament started in July last year). In the first game, played on the net on Sept. 13, Shin (W) upset his opponent’s lead and won by half a point. The second game was played on Sept. 15; taking black, Shin won by resig. after 173 moves. First prize is $150,000.
Shin was born on March 17, 2000, and this is his fourth international title (see below for the other three). The other three are given below. Shin has a reputation for surpassing AI, which has earned him an interesting nickname: “shinko chino,” which means “Shin-built intelligence.” That is a pun on the term “jinko chino,” which means “artificial intelligence.”
Shin’s other titles: 4th Globis Cup (2017); 31st TV Asia (2019); 24th LG Cup (2020, this tournament began in 2019).

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The Power Report: Hoshiai’s first challenge; Ichiriki takes lead in Meijin; Ichiriki wins Kisei S League

Wednesday September 22, 2021

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Hoshiai Shiho 3P

Hoshiai to make first challenge
The play-off to decide the challenger to Fujisawa Rina for the 40th Women’s Honinbo was held at the Nihon Ki-in in Tokyo on August 23. Taking black, Hoshiai Shiho 3P (right) beat Koyama Terumi 6P by resignation. She will make her first challenge for a title. She may be a new name for some readers, but actually she is one of the best-known women players in Japan, as she has been serving as the MC of NHK’s TV tournament telecast on Sundays. Hoshiai turned 24 on September 4. The title match begins on September 28. Her opponent, Koyama Terumi, deserves praise for reaching the play-off. In an era of domination by young stars, the 51-year-old Koyama revived memories of her younger days when she won the Women’s Meijin title four times (1996‾98, 2005).

Shiki-sai Ichiriki or Four Seasonal Colors Ichiriki

Ichiriki takes lead in Meijin title match
This year’s 46th Meijin title match features what is undoubtedly the strongest pairing in current tournament go in Japan. Iyama held the top three titles and has continued to lord it over the go world despite entering his 30s. The challenger, Ichiriki Ryo, has been the in-form player in recent months and has looked the most likely to dethrone Iyama. However, although he has won 14 titles, he has not yet won one of the big three, unlike his closest rival, Shibano Toramaru. This match is his chance to rectify that.
The first game of the match was held at its customary venue of the Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo in Bunkyo Ward, Tokyo, on August 26 and 27. Iyama drew white in the nigiri. Both players played aggressively, so the game featured fierce fighting throughout, making this a spectacular start to the title match. However, Ichiriki’s strategy at an important point in the middle game was a little dubious, so Iyama took the lead. Ichiriki made an all-out attempt to capture a large group, but White cut off a black group and won the capturing race with a brilliant combination, one that he apparently worked out 25 moves in advance. Ichiriki resigned after move 212.
The second game was played at the Shiki-sai Ichiriki or Four Seasonal Colors Ichiriki in Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, on September 8 and 9, Ichiriki being written with the same characters, “one strength,” as in the player’s name. Although there’s no connection between the family that founded the inn and Ichiriki’s family, it was a pleasant coincidence for Ichiriki (the venue would have been chosen before the organizers knew who the challenger would be). The game was a real rough-and-tumble affair, with various moves supposed to be bad style, such as empty triangles and moves pushing through a knight’s move, appearing in the messy infighting. Iyama (B) delivered what Go Weekly called “unlimited punches,” with Ichiriki sometimes absorbing the impact, sometimes dodging lightly. Ichiriki had an edge, but in the endgame he missed a move that would have secured a win, so the game became a half-pointer. However, Iyama later made a mistake, so the half point went in Ichiriki’s favor. This was Ichiriki’s first win in a two-day game?he lost 0-4 when he challenged Iyama for the 42nd Kisei title in 2018.
The third game was played at Kakujoro inn in Tahara City, Aichi Prefecture, on 15 & 16 September, with Hane Naoki acting as referee. Ichiriki (B) got into trouble when he came under a severe attack, but he was able to pull off an upset. Iyama resigned after move 225. The fourth game will be played on September 28 and 29.  

Ichiriki wins Kisei S League
In a repeat of his Meijin League performance, Ichiriki Ryo has won the S League of the 46th Kisei tournament without dropping a game. Second place was taken by Yo Seiki 8P of the Kansai Ki-in. Results since my last report are given below.
(Aug. 16) Murakawa Daisuke 9P (W) beat Yamashita Keigo 9P by resig.
(Aug. 23) Ichiriki (B) beat Takao Shinji by resig.
(Sept. 16) Yo Seiki 8P (W) beat Murakawa Daisuke 8P by 2.5 points.
The final-round game between Kono Rin and Yamashita Keigo has yet to be played.

The winners of the other leagues have also been decided, though not all the games have been played yet. In the B League play-off, Son Makoto 7P, who won the B2 League with 6-1, defeated Shida Tatsuya 8P, who won the B1 League with 5-2. The game was played on September 6, and Son, taking black, won by resignation. The knock-out to decide the challenger looks like this: Numadate Sakiya 7P, winner of the C League, plays Son Makoto; the winner then plays Shibano Toramaru, winner of the A League; the winner plays Yo Seiki 8P, who came second in the S League; the winner then plays Ichiriki in a “best-of-three” in which Ichiriki has a one-win advantage, so he needs to win only one game to become the challenger.

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Justin Teng appointed to serve remainder of At-Large Board Member term

Wednesday September 22, 2021

Justin Teng has been appointed to serve the remainder of Ted Terpstra’s term as Board Member At-Large on the AGA’s Board of Directors. Terpstra has resigned his position on the Board, effective September 16th. A current and long-time go organizer in the San Diego area, Terpstra has served in a number of capacities for the AGA over the years, including as AGA Executive Vice President (2012-2014), Western Region Representative to the AGA Board (2014-2016), and most recently as At-Large Member of the AGA Board of Directors. 

Terpstra (2nd from left, in red shirt) and Teng (at left, with mic). photos courtesy Ted Terpstra (l) and Phil Straus.

“Ted has done so much for go in the US, and particularly for go in the San Diego area,” said Board Chair Lisa Scott. “Including organizing the 2017 US Go Congress and inspiring the Girls Championship Tournament.  I look forward to seeing what plans he has for bringing go to southern California in the future!”

With fewer than 12 months remaining in Terpstra’s term, the AGA Board appointed Justin Teng to serve the remainder as Board Member At-Large (through August 31, 2022). “Justin is well known as a strong player and tournament organizer, particularly through his work with youth with the Redmond Cup and Girls Championship,” said Board Chair Lisa Scott. “We are pleased to have him join the AGA Board.”

Questions or comments can be sent to Scott at lisa.scott@usgo.org.

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Friday deadline for North Carolina State Go Championship Tournament

Tuesday September 21, 2021

This Friday is the deadline to register for the North Carolina State Go Championship Tournament, coming up September 25-26 at Umstead State Park in north Raleigh. Sign up by 6p ET 9/24. The AGA-rated tournament will consist of six rounds, with three games each day. Jeff Kuang will be the Tournament Director.

Entry costs are $25 for adults and $15 for youths/students. You may register for one or two days of play; if you limit yourself to one day the entry costs are $15 for adults and $10 for youths/students. There will be generous cash prizes and trophies in all sections, with all entry fees returned as prizes. Participants must attend both days to be eligible for prizes.

Since this is an open-air tournament, COVID risks are reduced. However, organizers will provide masks and hand sanitizer and encourage players to use them. Players older than 12 years old must be vaccinated to participate.

Lunch will be provided onsite on Saturday and Sunday, courtesy of the Triangle Go Group and the AGA.

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The Power Report: Ichiriki perfect in Meijin; Ueno into King of the New Stars final; Iyama wins Gosei, 65th title

Monday September 20, 2021

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Ichiriki

Ichiriki’s perfect record in Meijin League
The final round of the 46th Meijin league was held on August 6. There was no suspense at the top of the league, as Ichiriki had taken an unbeatable lead of 7-0 in the previous round, but at the other end there were issues of demotion still to be decided. Kyo Kagen, Hane Naoki, Yamashita Keigo, and Shibano Toramaru were sure of their places. Yo Seiki, who had a bye in the last round, was the only player sure of dropping out. That meant that out of Kono Rin, Motoki Katsuya, and Anzai Nobuaki, two would have to drop out. Complete results for the final round follow:
Ichiriki Ryo Tengen (W) beat Yamashita Keigo 9P by resig.
Kyo Kagen Judan (W) beat Kono Rin 9P by half a point.
Motoki Katsuya (W) beat Hane Naoki 9P by resig.
Anzai Nobuaki 9P (B) beat Shibano Toramaru Oza by resig.

The position became simplified when Motoki won his game. He improved his score to 4-4 and took 5th place. Anzai needed not just to win but also to have Motoki (and Kono) lose, in which case there would be a play-off with Motoki for the sixth seat. This happens only when the players have the same rank, so this rule applies only to the three newcomers to the league, who are all ranked 7th. That’s why Anzai didn’t get a play-off with Shibano, although they finished on the same score. Shibano’s luck in keeping his place with a 3-5 score is indicative of how the Meijin League favors the status quo. In the Honinbo League, a score of 4-3 is sometimes not enough to keep your place. Incidentally, Kono is enduring one of the worst slumps of his career, the loss above being his 11th in a row. This was his 10th Meijin League in a row and the first time he lost his seat.

Ueno makes King of the New Stars final
On August 9, Ueno Asami, Women’s Kisei, (W) beat Nishi Takenobu 5P in the semifinal of the 46th King of the New Stars tournament by 4.5 points. This made her the second woman player to make the final. The first was Aoki Kikuyo 8P (then 7P) in the 22nd title. The other finalist is Sotoyanagi Sebun 3P; the best-of-three starts on September 20.

Iyama

Iyama wins Gosei, once again
The fourth game of the 46th Gosei title match was held at the Niigata Grand Hotel in Niigata City on August 17. Taking white, Iyama Yuta won by resignation after 198 moves and so survived a kadoban. He played quite aggressively and did not seem to fall behind at any stage. The highlights of the game were two brilliancies played by Iyama. One was a surprising move adding a stone to three captured white stones, but giving White leverage that he used in his second brilliancy. Incidentally, the referee for this game was Cho U. Aged 41, Cho was making his debut in this role. He was also the referee for the first game in the Meijin title match (see below). It’s a little unusual to choose as referees players who are still competing at the top. Cho is slated to play Iyama in the semifinal of the 69th Oza tournament; if he won that game, he would meet Ichiriki in the final to decide the challenger. (As it happened, Iyama beat Cho.) Actually, it’s not just Cho. The other three members of the group popularly called “the top four of the Heisei (1989-2019) era,” that is, Takao Shinji, Hane Naoki, and Yamashita Keigo, are also serving as referees for the Meijin title match.
The fifth game was held at the Nihon Ki-in headquarters in Tokyo on August 29. Iyama drew white in the nigiri and continued where he left off in the fourth game. He took the edge in the middle game, so Ichiriki felt that he had to stake the game on attacking a large white group. When this attack failed, he resigned. The game lasted 180 moves.
Iyama regained the title that he had held for six years in a row (2012‾2017: 37th to 42nd). He lost it to Kyo Kagen in 2018, who lost it to Hane Naoki in 2019, who lost it to Ichiriki Ryo in 2020. Perhaps a new dynasty will start. Iyama once again becomes a quadruple title holder. This is his 65th title, so he moves ahead of Sakata Eio into sole second place on the all-time list:.
Most titles won
1. Cho Chikun: 75
2. Iyama Yuta: 65
3. Sakata Eio: 64
4. Kobayashi Koichi: 60
5. Otake Hideo: 48
6. Kato Masao: 47
7. Cho U: 41
8. Yoda Norimoto: 36
9. Rin Kaiho: 35
10. Xie Yimin: 27

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AGA Board report

Tuesday September 14, 2021

The AGA Board met at the end of the 2021 e-Go Congress in a meeting that was open to all AGA members.  The board approved minutes of the May meeting and the July special meeting (called to discuss issues of Fair Play in online tournaments and Online Ratings).  The board also approved the final budget for the 2021-2022 fiscal year.  The board was also updated about the NAGF’s plans to hold a Pro Qualification Tournament in August 2021 (since postponed due to the pandemic), and approved times and dates for meetings for the 2021-2022 term.  These meetings are as follows: 

September 19, 2021 (Fall Board Meeting)
November 7, 2021 (Annual “Retreat” and Planning Meeting)
January 9, 2022 (Special COVID Meeting, if needed)
February 27, 2022 (Winter Board Meeting)
May 1, 2022 (Spring Board Meeting)
June 26, 2022 (Summer Business Meeting, if needed)
August 5, 2022 (Annual “Congress” Meeting)
August 6, 2022 (General Assembly Meeting)

Please contact Chair of the Board Lisa Scott at lisa.scott@usgo.org if you would like to attend any of the future meetings (including the mid-September meeting).

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