American Go E-Journal » Events/Tournaments

Pandanet AGA City League Round 2 this weekend

Monday January 23, 2023

Round 2 of Pandanet AGA City League happens this weekend. Watch teams from almost 40 teams and among 150 players from across the US and Canada. You can best find the games this Sunday January 29th @ 3pm EST/12pm PST in the AGA City League Rooms. Root for your local squad or your favorite national players and friends. Any schedule changes will be noted on the round pages:

A LeagueB LeagueC LeagueD LeagueE League

Share

1st New York State Championship registration open with $1,200 top prize

Wednesday January 18, 2023

Competition at the New York Institute of Go in Midtown Manhattan, NY

Registration for the 2023 New York State Championships is open to all players of all levels. The event will be held on February 25 and 26 at the New York Institute of Go in Midtown Manhattan, New York. 

The main events include the Open Tournament, New York State Open Championship, and New York Youth Championship with a maximum of 140 seats. Besides the main tournament games, there will also be evening events like Pair Go, Crazy Go, 9X9 and 13X13 Tournaments. The event is located in the center of Hell’s Kitchen with a variety of delicious food.

Thanks to a parent donor, all divisions from the double-digit kyu to the open division will be awarded cash prizes. Youth divisions will be awarded with trophies and certificates. Additionally, the two champions in open and youth state championships tournaments will receive specially designed trophies.

“After the New York Go Center permanently shut down 10 years ago, we lost not only a place for Go players to play Go, but also a big family for us to laugh and share stories with, forget about pressure and unhappiness, and just enjoy some Go time. We welcome everyone to the 10-year reunion tournament in Manhattan!” says NYIG founder Stephanie Yin.

 

Share

Ryan Li promoted to Professional 4 Dan

Wednesday January 11, 2023

Ryan Li’s recent win at the 2022 North American Professional Go Championship in Toronto (Toronto Go Spectacular lives up to its name 1/6/23) not only netted him the $6,000 top prize, but a promotion to Professional 4 dan, after he reached 60 points in the North American Go Federation’s Professional Rank Promotion System.

“It was a tough tournament,” Li told the EJ, “especially after unluckily drawing Alex in the semi-finals. The three games in the finals were unpredictable yet exciting. Having our own professional tournament means a lot to the pros and we look forward to the next one!” Added American Go Association President and North American Go Federation board member Gurujeet Khalsa (at left in photo), “I was honored to be in Toronto to watch the game that Ryan played to secure the championship and then present the trophy. He is a terrific representative for North American Go.”

Share

Last Call for Registration for 2023 AGHS Pair-Go Tournament

Friday January 6, 2023

AGHS Pair-Go Tournament: Sunday, 1/15/2023.

First round: 4 pm EST (1 pm PST). 
Second round: 7 pm EST (4 pm PST).
Registration deadline: Saturday, 1/7/2023 at 11:59 PST.

Rules and regulations
There are no restrictions on pair eligibility. You may pair up with anyone regardless of age and gender.

If you already have a partner, please register using this form. 
If you are looking for a partner, please register using this form.

Share

Toronto Go Spectacular lives up to its name

Friday January 6, 2023

By Keith L. Arnold, hka, with Patrick Bannister

A group photo of the participants
Group photo at the Toronto Go Spectacular

Those looking for evidence that in-person go events can still attract a crowd need look no further than the Toronto Go Spectacular, held at the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre (JCCC) from December 28 to 30. Organized by the North American Go Federation and sponsored by Deep Mind, the event attracted nearly 200 players and included youth, novice, Open and professional tournaments.

“It was a fantastic event and a real pleasure working with the Canadian team,” said American Go Association president Gurujeet Khalsa. “We are excited to be exploring more possibilities with them for North American cooperation.” “We’ve been talking about hosting a North American go event in Canada for many years,” added Canadian Go Association president James Sedgwick. “I was very pleased the stars finally aligned and we were able to make it happen.  The event was all I could have hoped for, and we are especially grateful to all the American participants who made the effort to attend and make this a truly North American event.”

The E-Journal team arrived bright and early for the invitational youth and pro events on Wednesday, December 28. Because only a few competitors were expected, this was the calm before the storm. Sixteen youth players — eight players under sixteen years old and eight players under twelve — arrived from throughout the US and Canada to contest two age group championships. They played a marathon knockout of two out of three matches that lasted for the entire event.

Also arriving on Wednesday were the four professionals battling for the 1st North American Professional Championship, with a $6,000 first prize at stake. Drawing for the initial pairings for the one-round semifinal, Alex Qi 1P of New Jersey drew his teacher Ryan Li 3P of New York, while Andy Liu 1P, also of New York, drew Henry Yu, a Canadian student living in Hamilton, who is certified 2p in Taipei.

The E-Journal broadcast Board One on OGS, where Ryan Li notched a steady and solid win over Alex Qi. At least that was the assessment of In-seong Hwang, one of the two guest teachers, in a lecture that evening. So there was great surprise when AI analysis revealed that Qi had actually held the advantage for most of the game. Meanwhile, on Board Two, Henry Yu made a comeback to win a close game with Andy Liu. (Game records: Semifinal Board One, Semifinal Board Two.)

The other main event began on Thursday, December 29, with the start of the six-round open event, as well as a novice tournament for beginners. When everyone had checked in, there were 184 players participating in the many events. Nick Prince kept check-in and pairings running smoothly with his Leago pairing software, and players could easily find their places either on the huge screen in the playing hall or on their phones.

Meanwhile the kids continued to play in the invitational room, and the North American Pro Championship continued. In the championship round, semifinalists Li and Yu would play a three-game final match to determine first and second place, and Liu and Qi would play a best-of-three match for third place. In the first games, Li defeated Yu, and Qi defeated Liu. (Game records: Final Game One, Third Place Playoff Game One.)

Open players were able to have their games reviewed by guest teachers In-seong Hwang 8d and Mateusz Surma 2p, who also offered his excellent series of kyu level go problems for sale. Food was provided onsite by by the JCCC, saving the players time during the busy event.

The huge and beautiful space of the The Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre was filled with the joyful noise of children, including a contingent decked out in identical blue sweatshirts from the New York Institute of Go, along with three other large groups from Canadian go schools. The largest was Gofun Studio, but We-Go Club and the students of Ms. Mu Miao were also well represented.

The final day, Friday, December 30, brought the crucial games in all the Spectacular’s events. In the morning, in the Pro Championship, Henry Yu evened the final, defeating Ryan Li by resignation, while Alex Qi defeated Andy Liu a second time to secure third place. (Game records: Final Game Two, Final Game Three, Third Place Playoff Game Two.)

Up to this point in the Pro Championship, White had won every game on Board One. “Invincible gote” seemed to be the motto, with pros choosing White every time they had a choice. For the final round on Board One, Ryan Li won the nigiri and, following the pattern, took White. In a very entertaining game, he managed to fend off Henry Yu’s relentless attacks to win a final capturing race. In-seong Hwang’s post-game review produced a riot of laughter from the crowd, particularly from the good natured Henry Yu, who laughed the loudest. Hwang’s lectures were broadcast on the AGA Twitch channel.

U12 tournament report: Waterloo youth Crane Kuo 3d came in as the favorite. Fighting hard to challenge him were Albert Tang 2d and David Fang 2d. They played a tight match with two of three games decided by less than two points, but in the end Tang earned the right to challenge Kuo. In the final match, Kuo won 2-0 with solid wins in both games. “We have played friendly games before and I won a fair percentage of them,” said Tang. “But in this match I had no chance at all. It seems Crane has taken a leap upwards in his playing level, it will be interesting to see what he can do from here.”

U16 tournament report: This event featured four strong 5d players who were expected to be fighting for the title. On one side of the bracket Shengda Tan 5d (a student from Montreal) sailed smoothly through to the final. He has been dominating play in the Canadian league the last couple of sessions, so this strong result was not a surprise. But on the other side of the bracket another Vancouver youth Ben Gong entering as 3d/4d knocked off both Derek Zhou 5d and Yuxin Fu 5d. However in the final Ben Gong could not take down Tan. They played two long and hard-fought games, but in the end the title went 2-0 to Shengda Tan.

Novice tournament report: 41 novice players from 25k-10k competed in a five-round one-day novice tournament. Although the level of play might not have attained that of the other events, the passion to compete was clearly no less, and the joy after victories on the (mostly) young faces was a pleasure to behold.

Open tournament report: The sixth round of the open was the last to finish. 124 players took part, with a very strong field of 25 competing in the championship group for the $1,000 first prize. In the end a tiebreaker was needed between Ivan Lo, Remi Campagnie, and Brady Zhang (a past North American representative in the Globis Cup who has recently started his studies at the University of Toronto), the three top players who finished 5-1; the tiebreaker went in Ivan Lo’s favor, and he took home the title. USA stars Albert Yen and Zhaonian Michael Chen both scored respectable 4-2 results, but couldn’t quite recover from early losses to put themselves in contention. (Selected game records from the Open: Round 2 Board 3, Round 4 Board 2, Round 5 Board 1, Round 6 Board 1.)

The closing ceremonies were hosted by Canadian Go Association President James Sedgwick, with the assistance of Irene Sha, Nick Prince, Sedgwick’s daughter Alice and niece Veronika Keras. American Go Association President Gurujeet Khalsa and NAGF President Andy Okun joined Sedgwick and Prince in awarding trophies, medals and gifts to the winners.

If the Spectacular becomes an annual event, whoever takes the torch from James, Irene, and their team truly will have a tough act to follow.

NOTE: The Open report has been updated; there were no players undefeated after five rounds.

U12 players (champion Crane Kuo 4th from right)

Image 1 of 13

Includes reporting by James Sedgwick. Photos courtesy Keith Arnold, Yunshi Li, Edward Zhang, Cyril Maurice, Shirlie Zhu, Nick Prince, Irene Sha, and multiple parents.

Share

Registration Open for 2023 AGHS Pair Go Tournament

Wednesday December 28, 2022

“We are excited to announce the return of the Pair-Go event, our biggest event!” says AGHS President Jenny Li, “Players across the globe of all ages and gender are allowed to participate, and there will be no restrictions on who you can partner up with. The tournament will be held on Sunday, January 15th, 2023 and will consist of 2 rounds held at 1pm and 4pm PST on KGS. The registration deadline is Saturday, January 7th, 2023 at 11:59 PST.”

If you already have a partner, please register using this form. 
If you are looking for a partner, please register using this form.

Players will be paired up based on rank. Only one person needs to fill out the registration form for each pair. Please email Aghsregister@gmail.com if your registration status changes (e.g. found a partner or need a partner).

For more information on rules and regulations, please read this document: 

Share

North American Online League to launch beta season in January

Friday December 23, 2022

Under the banner of the North American Go Federation (NAGF) a new online league is launching in January. North American Online League (NAOL) playwill be a benefit open to American and Canadian members of the AGA or CGA. The league is built upon the successful models that have been run by the Massachusetts Go Association (MGA) and the CGA. “We are thrilled to offer a new venue for passionate go players of the AGA and CGA to play competitive games without traveling,” says NAGF Executive Director Hajin Lee.  

The NAOL will run two-month seasons with five weekly games in each season played in round-robin groups of six. Milan Mladenovic, who currently runs the MGA league, will be the Director of the NAOL. Games will be played on OGS and integrated with the AGA and CGA membership systems through Leago, a league management software system developed under a grant from the Iwamoto North American Foundation (INAF). “The NAOL coming into existence is sure to be the start of a great year for the go community,” says Akita Noek of OGS. “The OGS team is proud to be part of it and look forward to the many seasons to come!” 

“We are very happy with the partnership and support received from OGS and Leago to make this happen” says AGA President Gurujeet Khalsa. “It will also allow us to give our members an online rating to parallel the one from face-to-face games.” CGA President James Sedgwick adds that “We’re very pleased to be joining our American friends to create a joint league with a larger player base, modernized playing infrastructure, and important additions like commentaries from high level players”.

The initial January-February season will be a beta version while testing and refining the software interfaces. It will be limited to 96 players with priority given to current CGA and MGA league members. To join the wait list to be added to the initial season, send an email to naol@usgo.org with your name, location and either AGA or CGA membership ID. The March-April season will be open to all current members.

Share

Just a few days remain to register for the Pandanet AGA City League for 2023

Wednesday December 21, 2022

Registration ends Friday December 23rd. Make sure all of your team is signed up and has a current AGA or CGA membership. Read through the rules on the Pandanet League site to learn of the new qualifications. Send the registration link  to your team to have them sign up. If there are any questions contact the TD for more information.

Share

Just over a week remains to register for this years Pandanet City League

Saturday December 17, 2022

Registration ends Friday December 23rd. Time is running out to register your team. The TD should be reaching out this week to some teams if there are issues. League announcements will not be announced until after registration is completed. Read through the rules on the Pandanet League site to learn of the new qualifications. Send the registration link  to your team to have them sign up. If there are any questions contact the TD for more information.

Share

6th Haesung Korean Female Kisung: Yoonyoung Kim, Choi Jeong, Eunji Kim and Kim Chaeyoung Reach Semi-Finals

Monday December 12, 2022

Yoonyoung Kim 8P (l) defeats Oh Yujin 9P on Nov. 22, broadcast by BadukTV

From November 21-29, Yoonyoung Kim 8P, Choi Jeong 9P, Eunji Kim 5P, and Kim Chaeyoung 7P made their ways to the semi-finals round of the 6th Haesung Korean Women’s Kisung. The tournament is a notable women’s championship in Korea featuring top female Korean professional players. Most games have been broadcast live on BadukTV, and the total prize pool sums to 121 million won (US $93,000) with a top prize of 50 million won ($38,000).

On December 12th, Yoonyoung Kim will face off against Kim Eunji. In the past two months, Yoonyoung Kim has achieved an impressive 12-game winning streak, during which she defeated world champion Oh Yujin 9P and Asian Games gold medalist Cho Hyeyeon 9P. Coincidently her winning streak was ended by rising star Kim Eunji on Dec. 4 in the Nanseolheon Cup championship match, but it ensures an exciting and perhaps emotional battle between the two in the Female Kisung semi-final.

The Korean Baduk Association has built a robust support system to ensure that generations of female players will continue to thrive. From as young as 15 years old, Kim Eunji 3P was able to play as many as 156 official games this year, winning 108. Choi Jeong 9P and Kim Chaeyoung, both aged 26, logged 95 and 94 rated games, and won 69 and 65 games respectively. Yoonyoung Kim 8P, aged 33, is a young mom who also spent several years teaching go in North America. Still, she managed to play 45 matches at around a 70% win ratio, and delivered enormous victories for her team in the Women’s Baduk League.

The marked black stone in the middle is believed to be a critical error, and Kim 8P wisely seized the opportunity to counter with the arrow-marked white stone.

Tournament table and game records can be found on the “GotoEveryone” website.

Analysis of game on Baduk TV:
Choi Jeong vs. Kim Eunseon: https://youtu.be/sRUsQPGusIU
Yoonyoung Kim vs.. Oh Yujin: https://youtu.be/AzwrS86hxAQ
Kim Chaeyoung vs. Kim Hyemin: https://youtu.be/sNgsyDA-Mpc
Kim Eunji vs. Heo Seohyun: https://youtu.be/gnBLvxDZnto

Share