American Go E-Journal » Europe

Ryan Li wins 1st Transatlantic Pro League

Monday August 16, 2021

Ryan Li 3P, a North American Go Federation certified professional, defeated European Go Federation professional Ilya Shikshin 4P by 2-0 in the best-of-three final of the 1st Transatlantic Pro League on August 15. Li wins the €1,000 prize along with the Transatlantic Pro League title. A recording of the live commentary on Twitch can be viewed by clicking here.

In the match to decide the 3rd place winner, Artem Kachanovskyi 2P defeated Tanguy Le Calve 1P by 2-1. For full details on the Transatlantic Professional Go League, visit the official tournament website.

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Ryan Li 3P and Ilya Shikshin 4P advance to Transatlantic Professional Go League final

Saturday August 14, 2021

The final round of the 1st Transatlantic Professional Go League will feature a showdown between North American pro Ryan Li 3P and European pro Ilya Shikshin 4P. The players will compete for a first-place prize of €1,000.

In the semi-final round, Li defeated Artem Kachanovskyi 2P and Shikshin defeated Tanguy Le Calve 1P to earn their seats at the final table. Kachanovskyi and Le Calve will play on Saturday, August 14 to determine the third- and fourth-place finishers. The final best-of-three match between Li and Shikshin will begin on Sunday, August 15.

All games will begin at 11AM EDT (5PM CEST). The European Go Federation will broadcast the match with professional commentary on its Twitch channel. For full details on the Transatlantic Professional Go League, visit the official website.

-report by Hajin Lee

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50 Years aGo – May 1971

Saturday May 22, 2021

by Keith L. Arnold, hka, with Patrick Bannister

The 11th Messe Go Tournament was held in Hannover, Germany, on May 1 and 2. Fifty players competed. In the final game, Korean visitor Lee Min-sup won, defeating European Champion Jürgen Mattern.

31 May Hon'inbo game between Ishida and Rin
31 May Hon’inbo game between Ishida and Rin

In those pre-Kisei days, the Hon’inbo tournament had greater prominence, with three games played in the title match in May. Title holder Rin Kaihō took a one game lead into the month. On May 6-7, Ishida Yoshio lived up to his “Computer” nickname with a brilliant win in yose by 1.5 points. However, he did not get that far in game three on May 18-19, as Rin forced a resignation with a dominance the Japanese go world had come to expect. As the month ended, on May 31, Rin stumbled with a blunder on move 92, leaving the match all square at 2-2. In this match photo, Ishida confidently plays a move, watched by the champion, and Maeda Nobuaki, the “god of Tsume-go”, in the center of the picture. (Game records: Hon’inbo Title Match Game One, Hon’inbo Title Match Game Two, Hon’inbo Title Match Game Three.)

The busy Ishida was simultaneously defending his Pro Best Ten title against Kajiwara Takeo 9d. The young champion prevailed in the first two games on May 14 and 24. (Game records: Pro Best Ten Final Game One; Pro Best Ten Final Game Two.)

Described as a new event, the Amsterdam Go Tournament was held on May 15-16. Attended by 80 players, including 10 from Germany (including our friend Horst Sudhoff), 8 from France, 5 from England, 2 from Yugoslavia, and 1 player from Japan, it was a truly international affair. This time, Jürgen Mattern won the final against Mr. Katō of Japan.

On May 28, legend-in-the-making Cho Hun-hyeon secured promotion to 5 dan at the Nihon Ki’in at the age of 18.

Photos courtesy of Go Review.

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Ryan Li 3P and Calvin Sun 1P join European professionals to form new Transatlantic Pro League, first round May 15th

Monday May 10, 2021

The North American Go Federation (NAGF) is joining the European Go Federation’s (EGF) Pro League to form a new Transatlantic Pro League, starting on May 15th. All EGF-certified and NAGF-certified pros have been invited to compete. Six European pros – Ilya Shikshin 4P, Ali Jabarin 2P, Artem Kachanovski 2P, Pavol Lisy 2P, Andrii Kravets 1P, Tanguy le Calve 1P – and two North American pros – Ryan Li 3P, Calvin Sun 1P – have confirmed their participation. The EGF held a qualification round for top European amateur players, in which Remi Campagnie 6D and Oscar Vazquez 6D earned seats in the league. The ten Pro League competitors will be divided into two groups, with the top two players from each group advancing to a play-off.

The Transatlantic Pro League is sponsored by the EGF, NAGF, AI Sensei, and BadukPop. The prize money for the winner is €1000 EUR. League games will be live-streamed on the EGF Twitch Channel on Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00 EDT (18:00 Central European Time) starting May 15th. For more information, visit the league website.

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50 years aGO – April 1971

Friday April 23, 2021

By Keith L Arnold, hka, with Patrick Bannister

Kajiwara Takeo
Kajiwara Takeo

The month began with Kajiwara Takeo 9d, the sharp tongued author of Direction of Play, defeating Sakata Eio on April 1 in the Asahi Best Ten. His subsequent win over Ōtake Hideo placed him in the best of five final against Ishida Yoshio. (Game record: Otake-Kajiwara.)

Ishida, of course, is the busy man of the month, winning his final game of the Hon’inbo League over Fujisawa Shūkō, unable to help his nephew, Fujisawa Hōsai, who was losing his match to Sakata at the same time. And so, Ishida won the league with a 6-1 record. (Game record: Shūkō-Ishida.) The first game of his challenge against Rin Kaihō was played on April 26-27, and did not go well, he was convincingly defeated. (Game record: Ishida-Rin.)

Arakawa wins the All Japan Amatuer Ladies Championship
Arakawa wins the All Japan Amateur Ladies Championship

April 6 saw Arakawa Kazuko upset Miyashita Suzue in the All Japan Amateur Ladies Championship. The photo captures the precise, dramatic moment when Arakawa, left, captures a large group to clinch the victory.

The British Go Championship required a final post Leeds Go Congress game between Jon Diamond and Tony Godard before Mr. Diamond prevailed on April 17 in London.

Finally, the First Gaijin Hon’inbo was held at Iwamoto’s Go Salon in Tokyo. Hugh Hudson, of San Diego, California, defeated M. Hall and Ishi Press’s Richard Bozulich to win the handicap event, securing promotion to 2k for his efforts.

Photos courtesy of Go Review

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Ilya Shikshin 3P wins 5th European Pro Championship

Wednesday September 30, 2020

After seven rounds, Ilya Shikshin 3P finished with a 6:1 score to win the 5th European Pro Championship played September 24th to 27th and sponsored by Pandanet. Eight players participated and games were streamed with commentary on the EuropeanGoFederation Twitch channel; Antti Törmänen, a European Pro living in Japan, provided some of the commentary.

The 7th round of the tournament featured a true final between Andrii Kravets and Ilya Shikshin. Ilya’s score after round 6 was 5:1 while Andrii had a 4:2 score. “Because of the face-to-face tie-break rule, Andrii would have been champion if he won this match against Ilya, but he lost with 1.5 points,” says European Go Federation President Martin Stiassny. “This was the deciding game of the championship!” 

The players were pleased with their first serious online tournament for single players. The second one, the 2020 European Championship, is currently ongoing on OGS and will run until late October.

Results:
Champion: Ilya Shikshin 3p with a 6:1 score
Runner-Ups: Mateusz Surma 2p, Ali Jabarin 2p, and Andrii Kravets 1p all with a 4:3 score. 
5th place: Alexandr Dinershteyn 3p with a score of 3:4
6th place: Pavol Lisy 2p with a score of 3:4
7th place: Tanguy Le Calve 1p with a score of 2:5
8th place: Artem Kachanovskyi 2p with a score of 2:5 

-report by Martin Stiassny

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Categories: Europe,Main Page,Other
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Corona Cup 2020 brings over 350 players across Europe together on KGS

Friday March 27, 2020

“On Thursday 12th March I was working in the garden for many hours and I knew my country was going to be in a quarantine soon,” says tournament founder and organizer Lukas Podpera, setting the scene for the tournament’s inception. “Many live tournaments had already been cancelled, therefore I started to think about ideas, what could I do for the Go community. And one of the ideas was to run an online tournament, originally planned only for Czechia, maybe Central Europe.” Originally hoping to gather about 100 participants, news of the tournament spread through international Facebook groups, prompting Podpera to send invitations to all EGF associations. “Corona Cup is an online tournament in the times of coronavirus crisis, when tournaments are cancelled around Europe and most of the Go clubs are not meeting. I’m trying to make it look as much as a live tournament as possible.”

Podpera and his team are using Google Docs to post pairings and disseminate information. The tournament will be a total of six rounds over the next three months, with paired players given a week to meet on their own time to play in the Corona Cup 2020 room on KGS and report results. The tournament is sponsored by Jena International Go School and supported by the Czech association who will also publish registration and results. Over 350 players have registered so far, including three professionals. “You can see that many European top players are participating,” says Podpera, “but I hope I can get a good result myself even in this kind of competition!”

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How AI study helped improve my go

Wednesday March 25, 2020

by Benjamin Teuber 6d (Germany)

For many years, I was considered the “eternal second” of the German championship. I finished as runner-up nine times – while never winning the title. No matter how well I did, I always managed to lose the decisive game.

Until November of last year, when, to my own and everyone else’s big surprise, I finally became German Champion with a perfect 7-0 record. After the tournament, I got a lot of comments like “you clearly improved” or “you must have studied a lot” from people. But, to be honest, I didn’t prepare much for this tournament. I did no go problems at all, I didn’t play many tournaments, I didn’t take any pro lessons. Please don’t get me wrong, I highly recommend these measures and have used them a lot in the past; that’s how I became 6 Dan, after all. They just can’t be responsible for my recent improvement.

What I have been doing though, was creating my own go study website, ai-sensei.com. It allows you to upload your games and quickly get them analyzed by very strong AI. I believe the key feature of this tool is the focus on big mistakes; that way you can work on your biggest weaknesses instead of getting lost in minor details. So while I didn’t spend as much time studying as I had previously, I did use AI Sensei to review every one of my games and find my biggest mistakes. I would also check an old game every now and then to review my past mistakes. Looking back, I believe this was a very efficient way to spend the limited time I had to study, and it might well be the biggest factor of my recent improvements.

So here’s my advice to anyone using go AI to study:
Focus on your biggest mistakes in each game
Don’t waste time exploring all the variations
Think about the AI recommendations in terms of shape, direction, and strength of groups
Revisit your past mistakes

I invite you to try out AI Sensei yourself; it can be used for free. But whatever tool or AI you are using, I think you’ll find these recommendations useful.

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European Youth Go Yearbook 2019 is released

Wednesday January 29, 2020

This is a story about the beginning of a new future for youth go players in Europe. The European Youth Go Yearbook 2019 with its only 140 pages covers the SEYGO Tour with in depth review of each of its five stages in Vatra Dornei, Jena, Zaostrog, Vienna and Lausanne during 2019, including interviews with the young talents and upcoming stars.

The chapter entitled Go Through the Eyes of Youth shows not just how the youth see go, but also what they feel about it. The book includes country reports from Romania, United Kingdom, Croatia, Germany, Ukraine, and France.

Detailed and easy-to-follow reviews of the semi-finals and finals of the U12, U16 and U20 categories of the tournaments are provided by Catalin Taranu 5P, Alexander Dinerstein 3P, Mateusz Surma 2P, Ali Jabarin 2P, Andrii Kravets 1P, and Sinan Djepov 5d.

The European Youth Go Yearbook was written by Sinan Djepov 5d, who was the European U20 Youth Go Champion in 2018 and is also a creator of the ExploreBaduk project which will soon be re-launched with its new version.

For a preview of the book, check out these two teasers: Why solving life & death is important? and Go Through the Eyes of Youth.

The book is available on sale as E-book or limited paper edition which will be on sale at several events: TIGGRE – Ellie Cup (Grenoble)European Youth Go Championship 2020 (Stubicke Toplice – Zagreb)64th European Go Congress (Kamyanets-Podilskyi) or at all SEYGO 2020 events.

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Dutch artist combines passions to create Go-themed art

Saturday November 9, 2019

Dutch artist, art historian, author and go teacher Kim Ouweleen has created an original series of Go-themed posters and postcards that are available on his website. “I’m very enthusiastic about combining my passions for drawing and Go,” Ouweleen told the E-Journal.  One of his latest efforts was a drawing he did for the Brazilian Nihon Kiin for the recent Latin American Go Congress. “My work has been travelling all over the world this year and has been sold at the Nihon Kiin in Tokyo, given to students by Blackie’s International Baduk Academy (BIBA) in Korea, was used to promote Teach the Teachers (an event for European go teachers in the EGCC), and much more,” he said. “I’ve also started customizing the backs of the cards for go schools and associations, like these for the Cyprus Go Association.”  To purchase one of his original drawings, contact Ouweleen at kim.ouweleen@gmail.com; you can also see more of his work on his Etsy shop and his t-shirts and other clothing designs can be found on his Spreadshirt webshop. Follow him on Facebook or Instagram.

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Categories: Europe,Go Art,Main Page
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