American Go E-Journal » 2013 » January

Rising Prodigies Defeat Top Pros in Exhibition Games

Friday January 18, 2013

In a surprising series of upsets, three players, all under 16 and who turned pro earlier this year, have defeated some of the top-rated Korean players.

Byun Sangil 2P (right) was born in 1997 and became a pro in early 2012; he’s currently ranked number 18 in Korea, and recently played in the Bailing and Olleh KT Cups.

Shin Minjoon 1P  (left) and Shin Jinseo 1P (below right) both became pros this July at the “Prodigy Pro Draft qualifier for ‘young talented students under 15.” They were born in 1999 and 2000 respectively.

Top players Lee Changho 9P, Lee Sedol 9P and Choi Cheolhan 9P each agreed to play exhibition matches against the rising stars. Unexpectedly, Lee Changho and Choi lost to their respective opponents, Shin Jinseo and Shin Moonjoon.

Lee began his game with an old-fashioned opening, and took the lead, but had the game reversed through the middle and end games.

“I can’t say that much about Shin after playing only one game,” said Lee afterwards, “but he seems to be very good at making good shape and fighting. He’s already quite strong, so if he keeps studying hard, I’m sure he’ll reach the top in the near future.”

Choi’s style of play is aggressive, and served him well when he defeated Shin in the preliminary rounds of the GS Caltex Cup. However this time Shin was about to seize on an early opportunity and held up through the endgame for a 2.5 point win.

“It’s easy to improve a lot at Shin’s age,” said Choi, “and if he can win some important matches, he’ll become a great player in the future.”

Lee Sedol was the only pro who managed to hold off his opponent, defeating Byun Sangil, his former student, by half a point.

“I was quite surprised to see the results of the other two games. I know the young players are already quite strong, but it’s still very impressive,” said Lee. He added that, “this is kind of event isn’t the same as a real match, so I don’t want the youngsters to become too excited. But they should reflect on this experience and keep going.”

Adapted from a report on Go Game Guru; click for game records and more information. Edited by Ben Williams

Categories: World,Youth
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EuroGoTV: January 17

Friday January 18, 2013

12 and Under Russian Championship: The 12 and Under Russian Championship, played from 01/12-13 in Moscow, Russia, was won by Valerij Kulishov 1k, second was Mikhail Dobricyn 6k and third was Kim Shakhov 5k… Barnaul Open Tournament: The Barnaul Open Tournament, played from 01/12-13 in Barnaul, Russia, was won by Evgenij Gorbachev 3d, second was Pavel Pristupa 2d and third was Zoja Gorbacheva 4k… La Carboneria played on 01/12 in Sevilla, Spain, was won by Adrian Dominguez 9k, second was David Ciudad 12k and third was Raul Aguilera 7k… Helsingin Mestaruus 2013 Avoin: The Helsingin mestaruus 2013 avoin, played on 01/12 in Helsinki, Finland, was won by Arto Heikkinen 2d, second was Anttoni Maula 1d and third was Pekka Lajunen 3d (left)Helsingin mestaruus: The Helsingin mestaruus, played from 01/12-13 in Helsinki, Finland, was won by Juri Kuronen 5d, secod was Vesa Laatikainen 5d and third was Javier-Aleksi Savolainen 5d… Campeonato Espana Femenino GO: The Campeonato Espana Femenino GO, played on 01/12 in Sevilla, Spain, was won by Sabina Rodriguez 8k, second was Elena Garrido 14k and third was Susana Ballesta 19k… Turniej o Smoczy Kamien: The Turniej o Smoczy Kamien, played from 01/12-13 in Krakow, Poland, was won by Koichiro Habu 4d, second was Kamil Chwedyna 4d (right) and third was Mateusz Chojnacki 1d… 1st Karlovac mini Tournament 2013: The first Karlovac mini Tournament 2013, played on 01/12 in Karlovac, Croatia, was won by Mladen Smud 1k, second was Vladimir Ribicic 19k and third was Lovro Furjanic 1d… Trys Karaliai 2013: The Trys Karaliai 2013, played on 01/12 in Vilnius, Lithuania, was won by Paulius Almintas 1d, second was Vidas Sadauskas 5k and third was Andrius Petrauskas 4d… Go7 Weekly Ranking 1: The Go7 Weekly Ranking 1, played on 01/12 in Vienna, Austria, was won by Peter Neubauer 5k, second was Matthias Frisch 1d and third was Christian Anderson 4k (photo Viktor Lin 5d place 5 of 11)… Children’s Convention Championship: The Children Convention Championship, played from 01/05-06 in Moscow, Russia, was won by Andrej Tkachuk 13k, secondwas Ksenia Ivanova 18k and third was Ivan Mitjushov 20k… Championship of Cheljabinsk: The Championship of Cheljabinsk, played from 01/04-05 in Cheljabinsk, Russia, was won by Sergej Sonin 2d, second was Oleg Novikov 2d and third was Konstantin Serikov 2k… Essen 2013: The Essen 2013, played from 01/12-13 in Essen, Germany, was won by Jonas Welticke 4d (right), second was Johannes Obenaus 5d and third was Matthias Terwey 4d… Decin Tournament: The Decin Tournament played from 01/12-13 in Decin, Czech Republic, was won by Lukas Podpera 5d, second was Martin Jurek 4d and third was Petr Kouba 2d… Warszawska Liga Go #1: The Warszawska Liga Go #1, played on 01/08 in Warszawa, Poland, was won by Karol Cieslak 1k, second was Dawid Jurkiewicz 1d and third was Bartosz Klimczak 3k…
- adapted from EuroGoTV, which includes winner reports, crosstabs, game records and photos. Edited by Taylor Litteral

Categories: Europe
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NA Go Convention Registration Nears 100; Daytrippers Welcomed

Friday January 18, 2013

Registration for the upcoming N.A. Go Convention is nearing 100, reports organizer Edward Zhang. The week-long event February 8-17 spans two weekends, beginning in Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ (2/8-12) and then moving to Arlington, VA (2/13-17); click here for the full schedule. Organizers are welcoming daytrippers by rewarding 3-win and 4-win players, and Zhang says that with $3,170 in cash prizes, plus trophies, books, convention certificates, and rank certificates, “everyone will win something!” Those “who can only make it one day, Saturday or Sunday, may see our event as a traditional one-day-four-round tournament, with a possibility of fifth and sixth rounds in Blitz or Pair Go at your discretion” adds Zhang. The pre-registration deadline for reduced rates has been extended to January 20. “Special thanks to Zhimin Zhang, president of Bei Dou Xing restaurant franchise in Hebei, China, for donating part of the cash prize pool,” Zhang adds. Transportation is being arranged for players traveling from New York to Parsippany; sign up here and “If there are enough requests, we will schedule a shuttle bus to pick up and drop off,” says Zhang.

Myungwan Kim 9P Live Tygem Commentary Friday on Bailing Cup Round 3; Andy Liu 1P Takes on Lee Sedol Sunday on go9dan.com

Thursday January 17, 2013

It’s going to be a busy online go weekend. On Friday, go fans can watch Myungwan Kim 9P comment on the Bailing Cup live on Tygem, as Chen Yaoye 9P (left) — down 0-2 — tries to stay alive in his battle for the title against Zhou Ruiyang 5P. And on Sunday, Andy Liu 1P will play Lee Sedol 9P on go9dan.com.

Kim’s commentary starts at 8:30p EST Friday, January 18 on the Tygem World Server, while the Liu-Sedol game is at 8a EST on Sunday, January 20 on go9dan.com.

In his online reviews of the first two games, Kim said that although Chen, currently the top player in China and considered one of the strongest players in the world, was expected to have a slight edge, “he was not able to stand up to the pressure of the championship series.” Zhou on the other hand, the number one player in China in 2011, has handled the pressure well, Kim said, “perhaps because he has played in a world championship once before.” In this best-of-five Cup, Chen will have to win all three of the remaining games to win the $300,000 prize and the international title. Whoever prevails in the series, the winner will have his first world championship.

Sunday’s Liu-Sedol game is the first in a 10-game series against the two new U.S. professionals, Andy Liu and Gansheng Shi, and Romanian pro Catalin Taranu 5P, sponsored by the new go9dan.com server (New Go Server Launches With 10 Top Pros in $100,000 Invitational). photo: Andy Liu (right) receiving his professional certificate from Myungwan Kim 9P in August 2012 after winning the AGA-TYGEMGO Pro Tournament; photo by Steve Colburn

 

Jujo Jiang Ing Cup First 2013 North American Ing Masters Qualifier

Thursday January 17, 2013

At the upcoming January 26 Jujo Ing Cup, sponsored by Ing’s Goe Foundation and organized by the Bay Area Go Players Association, players can not only compete for $3,000 in prizes, but strong players also have the chance to earn points to qualify for this year’s North American Ing Masters (NAIM) tournament. This year’s NAIM will be held at the 2013 US Go Congress, set for August 3-7 in Seattle-Tacoma, WA. The Jujo Jiang Ing Cup will serve as the first Western region qualifier. Register online before the event and receive a $10 discount:  click here to register.

Categories: U.S./North America
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Your Move/Readers Write: Android for SmartGo?

Thursday January 17, 2013

“I want an Android app for the smart go books!” writes Lee Frankel-Goldwater.
“I’d like an Android version for SmartGo Books too,” responds SmartGo’s Anders Kierulf. “And I keep getting requests from people for Android versions of SmartGo Books and SmartGo Kifu. However, when looking at the costs of maintaining another platform, both in $$$ and in time that could be spent improving the iOS apps, it’s not so clear. Several articles (The shocking toll of hardware and software fragmentation on Android developmentWhy we’ve decided to stop producing TNW Magazine for Android) highlight some issues with adding Android support. I’m not ruling out possible Android support in the future, but my current plan is to improve iOS support and add a Macintosh version before I consider adding any other platforms. Meanwhile, if you’re desperate for SmartGo Books, an iPad mini may be the ticket.”

Fast Times in Gotham City: A Game Recorder Tries to Keep Up

Wednesday January 16, 2013

By John Pinkerton

I knew I was in trouble as a game recorder when I saw the draw for Board 2 in the final round of the Gotham Go Tournament last Saturday.

On one side of the board — or I should say, “in one corner, with a quick right,” playing white — was Lee Kyoung 7D, whose lightning-fast game had left me in the dust two rounds earlier. In that game, before I had time to enter a well-known joseki in one corner, the players finished josekis in two other corners and started a fight. At the same time, we lost our internet connection, so the live broadcast was dead and catching up became a largely moot point. Hardwired to KGS now, and with another round under our belt, I’d thought I was ready for the final round.  However…

In the other corner is the champion of speed himself, Andy Liu 1P, who often uses his speed as a lethal weapon. In the World Amateur Go Championships a few years back, where each side got an hour and a half of basic time, Andy’s strategy was never to use more than 10 minutes, keeping his opponents under constant time pressure. On top of that, Andy loves to play ko’s. In a ko, every third move is obvious, but the recorder still has to enter it. The ko threat may be in almost any area of the board, so if you miss it, it can be hard to find. Then the response is also obvious—another chance for a quick move.

As expected, the game starts fast and doesn’t let up. At move 47, Chris Garlock, recording on Board 1, says to his audience, “Wow, stones are flying on Board Two…John’s gonna have his hands full keeping up.” An accurate assessment, but things were about to get even more interesting.

Kyoung holds up the clock and says, “You don’t need this, do you?” He starts to explain, adding “I mean, you play fast.” But without a moment’s hesitation, Andy has already shot back “Absolutely not.” In other words, game on.

As Kyoung turns off the clock, I’m mentally groaning, thinking uh-oh, someone’s going to crash and I just hope it isn’t me again. Eighty moves fly by in the blink of an eye before there’s a pause as Kyoung says “Oh my god…I made a reading mistake.” As he and Andy begin their review I breathe a silent sigh of relief as I type in the words “White resigns” and wrap up our KGS game broadcast.

NOTE: Complete Gotham Tournament standings/results have now been posted on the Gotham Go Group’s Facebook page.

Pinkerton is a regular game recorder and photographer for the American Go E-Journal.  Anyone interested in volunteering as a game recorder at AGA tournaments or events can email journal@usgo.org

 

 

An E-Book Author, Publisher and Reader Walk Into a Bar…

Tuesday January 15, 2013

The ongoing development of electronic publishing is often framed as a battle to the death between two formats, hard-copy versus electronic. But the reality may be more complex, as creators and users seek to maximize the advantages of both formats in a rapidly-changing technological landscape.

“The e-book version has the advantages of both printed books and a go file on the computer using a go program,” says Michael Redmond 9P, a top player and author of many hard-copy go books, who has recently released ‘Patterns of the Sanrensei’, written specifically for SmartGo Books. “The greatest advantage of go file on a computer is the ease and speed with which one can view the moves and variations, without having to search for the next move, and no problems with misplaced stones. I think the advantage of a printed book is that it is easier to grasp the overall flow of the game when you can see a number of diagrams on the pages, and can compare diagrams, check the text analysis, with it all there in front of you. With SmartGo Books you can start with the book view, and it looks just like a printed book. Then you just touch a diagram, and you can enlarge it, play out the moves, and do just about anything you might want to do while viewing a file on a pc. You can try adding moves, in case you want to be sure about if that ladder really works. Then you return the diagram to it’s original size, and everything is as it was before, in the book form. Any moves you added will disappear, so you don’t need worry about messing up the diagrams. This combination of the strengths of books and computers allows the author to present more information, and for the reader it is relatively easy to understand. When I first saw what SmartGo could do on an iPad I thought it was perfect already, then I wanted to write a book for it, and that is how the book ‘Patterns of the Sanrensei’ came to be. Since then, (SmartGo Books publisher) Anders Kierulf has actually managed to make it even better, with inline diagrams and links between diagrams that add depth and enrichen the learning experience.”

Kierulf notes that since SmartGo Books — which has now released several dozen e-books, many of them re-issues of classics like the Elementary Go Series or Janice Kim’s Learn to Play Go books — “are currently limited to iOS devices (iPad and iPhone), the impact on printed book sales will necessarily be limited.” In fact, Kierulf (at left showing Eric Cotsen the ‘Invincible’ e-book at the 2012 Cotsen Open) says, “There’s some indication that releasing a book on SmartGo Books actually increased sales of the printed copies, which I’m glad to hear, as we need to keep a healthy ecosystem for go book authors and publishers.” Kierulf adds that “For me personally, being able to carry ‘Invincible’ in my pocket has made the whole SmartGo Books project worth it. So many people (including me) own the printed copy, but have never had the opportunity to study the games properly.”

“In reviewing both the print and SmartGo version of ‘Patterns of the Sanrensei’,” I found that is was very easy to read the SmartGo version because of the virtual go board capability,” said go player Robert Huang, an AGA 6 kyu. “This is much more convenient than the print version and simple eBook version on iBook or Kindle. I was able to start, stop, pick up where I left off, and finish the entire book in a relatively short amount of time. I think being able to actually visualize the move sequence, as opposed to mentally playing the sequence is very helpful.” Huang adds that “I am not sure how much I actually retained at this point, but the proof will be in the pudding as I play more games. Hopefully, I will see my ranking improve.”

What are your thoughts on hard-copy vs. electronic go books? Let us know at journal@usgo.org! photo by Chris Garlock

Jason Clancy Tops MGA Winter Tourney

Monday January 14, 2013

Jason Clancy 6k (at left, in green sweater) took first place at the January 13 Massachusetts Go Association Winter Tournament, topping a 24-player field that ranged from 4 dan to 20 kyu. “Twenty three players pre-registered,” reports  Tournament Director Eva Casey. “Three of those were no-shows, so twenty players got the pre-registration discount.   The majority of the players joined or renewed membership in the Massachusetts Go Association, thus meriting an additional discount.” Casey thanked the Boylston Chess Club in Somerville for use of their premises.
Winners: First  Place: Jason Clancy 6k; Second Place: Elliot Stern 7k; Third Place: Alex Linden 12k.
photo courtesy Eva Casey: left to right: Clancy-Peters; DaSilva-Linden; Nahabedian-Yamkovoy

 

 

Categories: U.S./North America
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This Week’s Go Calendar: Evanston

Monday January 14, 2013

January 19-20: Evanston, IL
14th Annual Winter Workshop with Yilun Yang
Mark Rubenstein mark@easyaspi.com 847-869-6020

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: Calendar
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