American Go E-Journal » SportAccord World Mind Games

1-Day SAWMG Qualifier set for Monday on KGS

Sunday September 21, 2014

The AGA is holding a 1-day tournament on KGS on Monday, September 22 to select the replacement for Gansheng Shi, who was selected to represent North America at the SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG) but could not go. Mingjiu Jiang will play Eric Lui on Monday at 12 noon EDT in the AGA tournament room, and the winner will later play a deciding game with Jie Liang. The time for the second game is yet to be determined, but we’ll try to post it on our Twitter and Facebook accounts.

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Sportaccord Set To Launch Biggest-Yet World Mind Games Online Tournament

Wednesday September 10, 2014

Registration for the 2014 SportAccord World Mind Games – Pandanet Online Tournament continues through September 30.The winner will 2014.09.10_SAWMG-header1participate in the 4th edition of the SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG), scheduled for December 11-17 in Beijing. Following last year’s success with participation in the SAWMG reaching 700,000 players worldwide, SportAccord — in partnership with RSportz, the community-based global sports network, and online platforms Bridge Base Online, Chess.com and Pandanet — is launching the World Mind Games Online Tournament Portal, a community-based destination for all participants featuring information on the online games’ rules, mind sports’ news and tournaments’ results. Follow the games on Twitter at WorldMindGames, hashtag #mindgames2014

The Bridge, Chess and Go online games will be operated and hosted by platform partners Bridge Base Online, Chess.com and Pandanet respectively. Registration is open for players from all levels, advanced to beginner. All participants get a chance to win prizes including Samsung TVs, tablets, Rado watches, and more. 12 000$ prize money will be shared among the winners of the tournaments. The tournaments will start from September 15 on all platforms.

SportAccord, the Union of International Sports Federations, operates four Multi-Sports Games, the World Combat Games, the World Beach Games, the World Urban Games and the World Mind Games. The 4th edition of the SportAccord World Mind Games will once again feature bridge, chess, draughts, go and xiangqi (Chinese Chess) in cooperation with the respective International Sports Federations. “The SportAccord World Mind Games reunites the world’s best players who compete for glory and prize money,” said SportAccord. “SportAccord is constantly looking to engage more people in mind sports in a fun and exciting way through cultural programs and online games.”

SAWMG/Pandanet Online Tournament Registration Opens

Saturday August 23, 2014

Registration is now open for the 2014 SportAccord World Mind Games – Pandanet Online Tournament. This year’s go tournament, 2014.08.23_wmg online tournament_all_platforms_v2held jointly with Chess.com and BridgeBase.com, includes different bands and multiple winners in each band.  Generous cash prizes will be awarded, along with other prizes such as tablet computers, Swatches, digital cameras, etc.  In addition, SportAccord will provide weekly lottery prizes for all players who played in any given week, including computers, TV’s, etc.  Click here for details.

SAWMG Highlights Posted on YouTube

Saturday February 15, 2014

Highlights from the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games — held in Beijing last December — have now been posted on YouTube. The overview (the go part starts at about 35:50) includes some brief commentaries by Michael Redmond 9P on the finals, an interview with Thomas Hsiang and a visit to a go class. There are also links to the daily reports published during the event, including more interviews and Redmond’s game commentaries with EJ Managing Editor Chris Garlock.  

2013 SportAccord World Mind Games Overview: Reports, Photos, Games & Commentaries

Wednesday December 18, 2013

The American Go E-Journal collaborated with Ranka Online and SportAccord to again provide comprehensive coverage of the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG), held December 12-18 in Beijing, China. The team included American Go E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock, Ranka Online Editor Ivan Vigano, James Davies, John Richardson, Yuki Shigeno and Michael Redmond 9P. See below for a selection of highlights of the E-Journal coverage, or click here for all of Ranka’s reports.  

Korea Men’s Team & Zhiying Yu Win Gold in World Mind Games

Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 5 (finals) and Women’s Individual Round 7 (final).

China Wins World Mind Games Pair Go Tournament; Meeting the Masters; Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun?
Includes game records/commentaries for Pair Go rounds 1-3.

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 4
: China & Korea Sweep to Final Showdown in Men’s Team Tourney; Wang Chenxing & Yu Zhiying in All-China Women’s Individual Final; Redmond Audio Game Commentaries
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 4 and Women’s Individual Rounds 5 & 6. 

Ranka SAWMG Highlights: Japan’s National Team; Interview with Park Jieun; The Red-Faced King; Designing a Tournament with Martin Stiassny

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 3 (Saturday, December 14): Wang Chenxing Clinches Medal in Women’s Individual Tourney; China & Korea Continue to Steamroll Men’s Teams, North America Blanked Again; Benjamin Teuber on Playing Michael Redmond 9P and Studying in China; Draughted In: Why Zhao Hanqing Changed Games; Going to the Max
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 3 and Women’s Individual Round 4.

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 2 (Friday, December 13): North America & Japan’s Men’s Teams Winless as China-Korea Final Looms; All-China Final in Women’s Individual; PLUS: Svetlana Shikshina 3P Moves to Canada; What We Can Learn from Chess & Japan’s Yoshida Mika Considers Flamenco
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 2 and Women’s Individual Rounds 2 & 3

Men’s Team & Women’s Individual Events Launch Go Competitions at SportAccord World Mind Games (Thursday, December 12)
Includes game records/commentaries for Men’s Team Round 1 and Women’s Individual Round 1

2013 SportAccord World Mind Games Launch in Beijing
SportAccord World Mind Games North American Player Profiles
SportAccord World Mind Games Japanese Player Profiles
2013 SportAccord Online Tournament Into Final Stage

 

China Wins World Mind Games Pair Go Tournament; Meeting the Masters; Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun?

Wednesday December 18, 2013

China’s Chenxing Wang 5P and Ruiyang Zhou 9P (left) defeated Chinese Taipei’s Joanne Missingham 6P and Yuan-Jyun Wang 6P on Wednesday to win gold in the SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG) Pair Go competition. The 3-round event capped the third annual SAWMG competition, which included men’s team and women’s individual events in go, as well as competitions in chess, bridge, draughts and Chinese Chess, and ran December 12-18 in Beijing, China. The bronze medal was won by Park Jieun and Kim Jiseok, the pair from Korea. Click here for full go coverage on Ranka Online, complete event coverage on the SportAccord World Mind Games website – including video commentaries by Michael Redmond 9P on the SAWMG YouTube channel — and of course on the usgo.org website. Coverage this year included audio commentaries by Redmond on KGS; check KGS Plus under Recent Lectures.

Days 5&6 (Tuesday, 12/16 & Wednesday, 12/17) Summary: (winners denoted with links; click on links for game records, uncommented unless otherwise noted)
Round 1 (12/16): Europe (Kovaleva-Fan)-China; Korea-North America; Europe (Shikshin-Shikshina)-Japan; Chinese Taipei-Europe (Burdakova-Lisi).
Round 2 (12/16): Europe (Burdakova-Lisi)- North America; China-Japan (Redmond commentary); Europe (Shikshin-Shikshina)- Europe (Burdakova-Lisi); Chinese Taipei-Korea.
Round 3 (12/17): China-Chinese Taipei (Redmond commentary);  Japan-Korea; Europe (Burdakova-Lisi)-Europe (Shikshina-Shikshin).

Meeting the Masters: Students at the Huajiadi Experimental Primary School in Beijing got a chance to meet some of the SportAccord World Mind Games’ top go players and officials on Tuesday. The school is known for its cutting-edge approach to teaching and boasts nearly a thousand junior grade go players. The guests were greeted by two rooms of children buzzing with excitement. In the first classroom, a hands-on lesson on nakade grabbed the children’s attention, and in the second the pupils quickly settled down and answered questions about the history and rules of the game. The guests were then taken downstairs to the gymnasium, where boards had been set out for the 40 kids who would take on top professionals in nine-stone handicap games….click here for complete report.

Do Bridge Players Have All The Fun? “Let’s have dinner! We drink vodka!”  Not the first words you would expect to hear after the tense final of an international go final. But this is how bridge superstar Fulvio Fantoni greeted the rival Polish team at the conclusion of the Pairs Open at the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games. “We’re all good friends – we’ve known each other for many years,” Fantoni says… click here for full report

 

Redmond: “Easy Does It”

Tuesday December 17, 2013

“Study life and death problems.” We’ve all heard that advice on how to get stronger at go, but it turns out that there’s a missing word that’s key to improving. The word is easy. Literally. Michael Redmond 9P revealed the missing word during one of his KGS audio commentaries on SAWMG games last weekend: “Study easy life and death problems.” Hard problems, “especially really complicated ones,” tend to be discouraging, “and they rarely come up in actual games,” Redmond said. Studying easy problems — “at least 15 minutes a day” — trains your eye to quickly see shapes and patterns and solving problems provides positive reinforcement that makes studying more likely, he adds. And since everyone’s definition of “easy” will necessarily be different, look for problems you can solve in two minutes or less.
- Chris Garlock

Korea Men’s Team & Zhiying Yu Win Gold in World Mind Games (updated with games & photos)

Monday December 16, 2013

Click here for latest winner results and Ranka Online’s full coverage. At 9 pm EST (6p PST) Tuesday night, Michael Redmond 9P and E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock will provide live audio commentary on KGS on the top boards at in the Pair Go competition.

The men’s team competition at the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games came to a dramatic finish Monday in Beijing as China battled Korea for the gold medal. The games on the first two boards both ended in resignation after intense fighting, with Korea’s Park Jeonghwan winning on board one and China’s Zhou Ruiyang on board two. On board three Korea’s Cho Hanseung, who had lost a game in the match against Chinese Taipei in the first round, faced China’s undefeated Wang Xi and eked out a win by a fraction of a stone, and the jubilant Korean team (right) took home the gold medals. The other two men’s matches were also dramatic. Chinese Taipei defeated the European team (which won 5th place) to capture the bronze medal, and Japan defeated North America (which finished 6th) to finish fourth, but Canada’s Yongfei Ge ended the North Americans’ winless streak by beating a Japanese opponent on board three. The European team also won a game, and they very nearly won two; Chinese Taipei’s lead player Chou Chun-hsun was sweating profusely after a last-minute come-from-behind victory over France’s Fan Hui. In the women’s individual competition, Yu Zhiying (left) defeated Wang Chenxing in the all-Chinese final match to take the gold, with Wang winning silver, and Korea’s Park Jieun the bronze. - James Davies; click here for his full report in Ranka

Day 5 (Monday, 12/16) Summary: (click on links for game records, uncommented unless otherwise noted)
Men’s team tournament (fifth round): Korea 2-1 over China: Park Jeonghwan beat Fan Tingyu (Redmond Commentary), Cho Hanseung beat Wang Xi; Zhou Ruiyang beat Kim Jiseok; Chinese Taipei 2-1 over Europe: Chou Chun-hsun beat Fan Hui, Ilya Shikshin beat Wang Yuan-jyun, Lin Chun-yen beat Pavol Lisy; Japan 2-1 over North America: Fujita Akihiko beat Huiren Yang, Hirata Tomoya beat Daniel Daehyuk Ko, Yongfei Ge (right) beat Tsuruta Kazushi. 

Women’s individual tournament (seventh round): Yu Zhiying (China) beat Wang Chenxing (China) (Redmond Commentary).
Check the KGS Plus 12/16 games (under Recent Lectures) for Redmond’s audio commentaries on both the men’s and women’s finals with EJ Managing Editor Chris Garlock) 
- photos by Ivan Vigano 

 

SportAccord World Mind Games Day 4: China & Korea Sweep to Final Showdown in Men’s Team Tourney; Wang Chenxing & Yu Zhiying in All-China Women’s Individual Final; Redmond Audio Game Commentaries

Monday December 16, 2013

The third annual SportAccord World Mind Games are taking place December 12-18 in Beijing, China. Click here for latest go competition winner resultshere for Ranka Online’s full coverage and here for reports on all 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games competitions (chess, go, bridge, Chinese Chess & draughts). CLICK HERE TO WATCH GAMES LIVE! 
NOTE: At 9 pm EST (6p PST) on Monday, December 16, Michael Redmond 9P and E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock will provide live audio commentary on KGS on the SAWMG China-Korea men’s team final.  

China & Korea Sweep to Final Showdown in Men’s Team Tourney: In the fourth round of the men’s team event at the 2013 SportAccord World Mind Games China swept Europe 3-0 to remain completely undefeated. Korea rolled over North America 3-0, but on the top board in this match, the USA’s Huiren Yang (left), the oldest player competing, played an outstanding game against Korea’s top-rated pro Park Jeonghwan (right). The Koreans following the action on the monitor screens outside the playing room praised Yang’s opening and thought he had ample opportunity to win, even though Park prevailed in the end. In contrast, Daniel Daehyuk Ko was completely hamstrung by Kim Jiseok on board two, and Yongfei Ge, who tried an unusual opening with a three-stone corner enclosure on board three, was quickly beaten by Cho Hanseung. So China and Korea will meet on Monday to decide which team will take home the gold medals.

Attention now focused on the match between Japan and Chinese Taipei. The game on the top board, between Chou Chun-hsun (Chinese Taipei, black) and Fujita Akihiko (Japan, white) was played to a YouTube audience with live commentary from Michael Redmond. Black framed the lower side. When White made a capping invasion, Black jumped into the lower left corner. In the next twenty moves White let Black capture the corner but built a solid wall above it, reducing Black’s framework to thirty points of territory buried under the wall. ‘At this point I thought White had a slightly better position,’ Fujita said. After a black mistake in the choice of joseki in the top right corner and a favorable exchange on the top left, White had a taken over large area stretching from the left side into the center and had a clear lead. Black tried unsuccessfully to reduce White’s area, and then resigned. First game to Japan.

On board two, Hirata Tomoya (black) started well for Japan, but then made a life-and-death mistake and lost a big group. ‘This game was very tough for me,’ said his opponent Wang Yuan-jyun. ‘In the opening I made a mistake that let Black capture five stones and get a strong position. Then Black made a minor mistake and I caught up a little, but I made another mistake that let him thrust out into the center and I was then even further behind. My only chance was to attack one of his groups and try to kill it. This should not have been possible–there were many variations and none of them worked–but fortunately for me he overlooked a move and the group died.’ Second game to Chinese Taipei.

The result of the match now rested on the outcome on board three, where Japan’s eighteen-year-old Tsuruta Kazushi was playing Chinese Taipei’s fifteen-year-old Lin Chun-yen. “I felt that I had the advantage in the opening,” Lin said later. “I may have been about ten points ahead – but I lost that lead in the middle game. Now I was behind and the game was quite unfavorable for me, but I managed to regain the lead in the endgame. At the point when my opponent resigned I was about ten or fifteen points ahead.” Match to Chinese Taipei by a 2-1 score, putting them in a strong position to capture the bronze medals. They also won the bronze medal last year in men’s individual competition, after Japan beat them to take the bronze in mixed team competition two years ago.

Wang Chenxing & Yu Zhiying in All-China Women’s Individual Final: In the fifth round of women’s repechage competition, played in the morning before the men’s team round, Wang Chenxing (China) was matched against Svetlana Shikshina (Russia) and Park Jieun (Korea) against Chang Cheng-ping (Chinese Taipei). Park and Chang played a classical opening, and their game looked close until Park isolated four of Chang’s eyeless stones on the lower side. Chang fought desperately to counterattack, and though she succeeded in slicing White apart, she could not kill the cut-apart pieces. Instead, another black group died and Chang resigned. In the Wang-Shikshina game, Wang forced a weak black group to live with just two small eyes. Both sides then made big territories elsewhere. Shikshina declined a chance to start a major fight and the game ended without incident, Wang winning comfortably by 10.5 points.

The final round of the women’s repechage was therefore played between Wang and Park. Their game proceeded until all the territories had been completed and only neutral points remained to be filled. At this point Park counted that she was a bit behind and resigned to take possession of the bronze medal. Wang will play China’s Yu Zhiying again on Tuesday to see who gets the silver medal and who gets the gold. While Wang was defeating Park, a playoff for fourth place was also taking place. Chang Cheng-ping (right) and Svetlana Shikshina (left) played a lively game that proceeded with lots of skirmishes but no decisive battles. Shikshina found herself increasingly on the defensive, however, forced to concede territory in order to keep her groups alive. Late in the endgame, when Chang succeeded in capturing five white stones in the center, Shikshina resigned. Fourth place therefore goes to Chinese Taipei’s Chang Cheng-ping while fifth place goes to Russia’s Svetlana Shikshina.
- James Davies, Ranka; photos by Ivan Vigano

Day 4 (Sunday, 12/15) Summary: (click on links for game records, uncommented unless otherwise noted)
Men’s team tournament (fourth round): Chinese Taipei 2-1 over Japan: Fujita Akihiko beat Chou Chun-hsun (Redmond commentary); Wang Yuan-jyun beat Hirata Tomoya; Lin Chun-yen beat Tsuruta Kazushi (Redmond commentary); China 3-0 over Europe: Fan Tingyu beat Fan Hui; Zhou Ruiyang beat Ilya Shikshin; Wang Xi beat Pavol Lisy; Korea 3-0 over North America: Park Jeonghwan beat Huiren Yang; Kim Jiseok beat Daniel Daehyuk Ko; Cho Hanseung beat Yongfei Ge
Women’s individual tournament
Fifth round: Wang Chenxing (China) beat Svetlana Shikshina (Russia); Park Jieun (Korea) beat Chang Cheng-ping (Chinese Taipei)
Sixth round: Wang Chenxing (China) beat Park Jieun (Korea)

Redmond Audio Game Commentaries: This year, in addition to the various video feeds made available by SportAccord, Michael Redmond 9P and American Go E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock are doing live audio game commentaries on KGS, which are also being posted on KGS Plus under Recent Lectures.“12/15/13 8:59″ is the commentary on the Men’s Team Round 4 game between Fujita Akihiko (Japan) and Chou Chun-hsun (Chinese Taipei); “12/15/13 9:29″ is the Tsuruta Kazushi (Japan) vs Lin Chun-yen (Chinese Taipei) Men’s Team Round 4 game.

Ranka SAWMG Highlights: Japan’s National Team; Interview with Park Jieun; The Red-Faced King; Designing a Tournament with Martin Stiassny

Monday December 16, 2013

Japan’s National Team: Members of Japan’s brand-new national team — nicknamed ‘Go-Go Japan’ — talk about their practice sessions and how being on the team has changed their approach to the game… Interview with Park Jieun: The bronze medalist in the women’s individual event says go in Korea has changed from an enriching cultural activity to a sport that’s “only about winning”…The Red-Faced King: Inspired to aim for the top by Mikhael Gorbachev, the former President of the Soviet Union, who also has a prominent “port-wine stain” birthmark, Chou Chun-Hsun 9P (right), known as the ‘Red-Faced King’, talks about why teaching is an important responsibility and why go players need to maintain good physical fitness… Designing a Tournament with Martin Stiassny: The European Go Federation President discusses possible format changes for next year’s World Mind Games and the need for an internationally standardized ratings system…
photo at left by Ivan Vigano; Chou Chun-Hsun photo courtesy Pandanet