American Go E-Journal » Computer Go/AI

AlphaGo-Ke Jie viewing parties update

Tuesday May 23, 2017

AlphaGo-Ke Jie viewing parties continue this week at the National Go Center in Washington DC (Center opens at 7p Wednesday; match at2017.05.23_dc-alphago 10:30pm EDT); the Seattle Go Center will be open late again Wednesday night as well (schedule is on their calendar), and the Triangle Go Group will host an AlphaGo viewing party on Wednesday evening at the EcoLounge at Recyclique, 2811 Hillsborough Rd, in Durham.

New events include:
The UCLA Go Club in Los Angeles is hosting a viewing party this Friday, May 26 at UCLA, Dodd Hall, room 175 (315 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095). “Anyone is welcome to join,” says Isaac Deutsch. “We are hoping to have some lively discussions during the final game!”
The Boulder Go Center will host an AlphaGo Viewing Party on May 27 in Denver, CO. Contact Stu Horowitz at stuart590@earthlink.net 720-289-6927 for details.

Myungwan Kim will stream live game commentary Thursday night on the AGA’s YouTube channel, starting at 11PM PST.

Got party? Email us at journal@usgo,org!

photo: at the National Go Center Monday night; photo by Chris Garlock

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Ke Jie: AlphaGo “like a god of Go”

Tuesday May 23, 2017

Excerpted and adapted from a report in The New York Times 

“Last year, (AlphaGo) was still quite humanlike when it played,” said Ke Jie 9P after the first match against the go-playing AI Tuesday. “But this year, it became like a god of Go.”
“AlphaGo is improving too fast,” Ke said in a news conference after the game. “AlphaGo is like a different player this year compared to last 2017.05.23_24alphago-master768year.”
Mr. Ke, who smiled and shook his head as AlphaGo finished out the game, said afterward that his was a “bitter smile.” After he finishes this week’s match, he said, he would focus more on playing against human opponents, noting that the gap between humans and computers was becoming too great. He would treat the software more as a teacher, he said, to get inspiration and new ideas about moves.
Chinese officials perhaps unwittingly demonstrated their conflicted feelings at the victory by software backed by a company from the United States, as they cut off live streams of the contest within the mainland even as the official news media promoted the promise of artificial intelligence.
2017.05.23_AlphaGO_hassabis

Excerpted from Wired 
This week’s match is AlphaGo’s first public appearance with its new architecture, which allows the machine to learn the game almost entirely from play against itself, relying less on data generated by humans. In theory, this means DeepMind’s technology can more easily learn any task.
Underpinned by machine learning techniques that are already reinventing everything from internet services to healthcare to robotics, AlphaGo is a proxy for the future of artificial intelligence.
This was underlined as the first game began and (DeepMind CEO Demis) Hassabis (in photo) revealed that AlphaGo’s new architecture was better suited to tasks outside the world of games. Among other things, he said, the system could help accelerate the progress of scientific research and significantly improve the efficiency of national power grids.

DeepMind Match 1 wrap up
2017.05.23_ke-jie-hassabis“There was a cut that quite shocked me,” said Ke Jie, “because it was a move that would never happen in a human-to-human Go match. But, afterwards I analyzed the move and I found that it was very good. It is one move with two or even more purposes. We call it one stone, two birds.”
“Ke Jie started with moves that he had learned from the Master series of games earlier this year, adding those new moves to his repertoire,” said Michael Redmond 9P. “Ke Jie used the lower board invasion point similar to AlphaGo in the Masters games, and this was a move that was unheard of before then. Although this was one of the most difficult moves for us to understand, in the last month or players have been making their own translations and interpretations of it.”
“Every move AlphaGo plays is surprising and is out of our imagination,” said Stephanie Yin 1P. “Those moves completely overthrow the basic knowledge of Go. AlphaGo is now a teacher for all of us.”

photos: (top) courtesy China Stringer Network, via Reuters (middle) Noah Sheldon/Wired (bottom) DeepMind

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AlphaGo prevails over Ke Jie 9P in first round of 3-game match

Tuesday May 23, 2017

In an exciting game played out to the last dame, the latest version of AlphaGo defeated Ke Jie 9P by half a point on2017.05.23_AlphaGo China  Rd1 Tuesday in the first round of a 3-game match in Wuzhen, China, part of the Future of Go Summit. The Summit features several formats, including pair go, team go, and a 1:1 match with the world’s number one player Ke Jie.

“Ke Jie fought bravely and some wonderful moves were played,” said Deepmind’s Demis Hassabis. “Interesting game, but it didn’t seem like Ke Jie ever had a real chance,” tweeted SmartGo programmer Anders Kierulf, an assessment that seemed shared by commentator Michael Redmond 9P, whose analysis from fairly early in the game had AlphaGo leading. However, Ke Jie was clearly prepared with a strategy — his second move was on a 3-3 point — and the complex game kept go fans riveted to their screens around the world and, in the US, into the wee hours of Tuesday morning as the endgame played out, providing plenty of fodder for the English language commentary team, which, in addition to Redmond, included Hajin Lee 4P, Stephanie Yin 1p and Andrew Jackson 4d.

The Future of A.I. Forum will take place on Wednesday, the second AlphaGo-Ke Jie on Thursday, pair and team go on Friday, and the third AlphaGo-Ke Jie match on Saturday. (use this Time Zone Converter to determine local dates/times)

DeepMind will be streaming the matches live, posting match updates and expert commentaries every day on this page and on their Twitter account, @DeepMindAI. For more details, you can visit the official event page here. American Go Association chapters continue to play watch parties (they’re eligible for $100 in non-alcohol expenses like pizza; click here for details); email details to journal@usgo.org and we’ll post an updated report.
- report by Chris Garlock
This post has been updated: Andrew Jackson is 4d, not 5d as originally reported. 

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AlphaGo watch parties planned across U.S.

Sunday May 21, 2017

American go clubs across the country are making plans to watch the upcoming AlphaGo-Ke Jie match. AGA chapters that hold an AlphaGo viewing party are AlphaGo 2nd gameeligible for $100 of (non-alcohol) expenses from the AGA’s chapter rewards points pool (read more here). Participating chapters thus far include the National Go Center in Washington, DC, Seattle, Austin and Durham. If your chapter is planning a watch party, email details to us at journal@usgo.org

The National Go Center’s watch party starts at 10:30p Monday night and runs until the match ends; pizza will be provided. The Center will be open for play starting at 9p and is located at 4652 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20016. “We’ll also be open for the remaining events,” reports Nate Eagle, including Tuesday starting at 7p and staying open for the Future of Go forum at 9pWednesday starting at 7p and staying open for the game starting at 10:30pThursday starting at 6p and staying open for the Pair Go / Team Play starting at 8:30p, and Friday starting at 7p and staying open for the final game starting at 10:30p. Click here for the up-to-date listings.

The Seattle Go Center reports that it will be open late to watch all five AlphaGo events.  The full Seattle schedule is on their calendar.  “We had over 60 players for the first AlphaGo/Lee Sedol game, and there is a lot of interest in this match between Ke Jie and AlphaGo as well”, reports Manager Brian Allen.

The Austin Go Club will be sponsoring a watch party on Monday evening for the first game of the Alpha Go vs Ke Jie match; check their Facebook page for details. The Triangle Go Group will host an AlphaGo viewing party on Wednesday evening at the EcoLounge at Recyclique, 2811 Hillsborough Rd, in Durham. “We’ll discuss and review the first game and thanks to the AGA, we’ll enjoy pizza as we try to digest the future of go,” says Bob Bacon. “This will be fun!”

The Neo Millennium Go Club will hold an AlphaGo vs Ke Jie watch party between 3pm and 6pm on May 28th in Andover, Massachusetts (497 South Main Street).  Jie Liang, Zhiping You and Ke Lu will be the main commentators.

photo by Brian Allen: Following the 2nd AlphaGo/Lee Sedol game
This story has been updated with the Millennium Go Club party.

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AGA Master Review Series, Game 48: Master [W] vs. Park Junghwan 9p [B]

Sunday May 21, 2017

Michael Redmond 9p & Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal provide commentary and analysis of the forty-eighth game of Master (AlphaGo). In 2017.05.21_AGA Master Review Series, Game 48this game, Master plays white against Park Junghwan 9p. “Up to move 24, this game is identical to game 22, in which Master shows a new way for White to invade the Chinese opening,” says Redmond. “Park stayed in the game much longer than most, but finally started to fall behind after White’s invasion at 78 was successful.”

 

[link]

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AlphaGo-Ke Jie match schedule released

Saturday May 20, 2017

DeepMind has released the schedule for the upcoming Future of Go Summit, featuring an updated AlphaGo in several formats, including pair go,2017.05.20_AlphaGo China  DeepMind team go, and a 1:1 match with the world’s number one player Ke Jie.

The action begins Tuesday in China (Monday night in the US), with an opening ceremony at 9p EST and the AlphaGo-Ke Jie match starting at 10:30p EST. The Future of A.I. Forum will take place on Wednesday, the second AlphaGo-Ke Jie on Thursday, pair and team go on Friday, and the third AlphaGo-Ke Jie match on Saturday. (use this Time Zone Converter to determine local dates/times)

DeepMind will be streaming the matches live, posting match updates and expert commentaries every day on this page and on their Twitter account, @DeepMindAI. For more details, you can visit the official event page here.

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AGA Master Review Series, Game 47: Master [B] vs. Tan Xiao 7p [W]

Saturday May 20, 2017

Michael Redmond 9p & Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal provide commentary and analysis of the forty-seventh game of Master (AlphaGo). In 2017.05.20_AGA Master Review Series, Game 47this game, Master plays black against Tan Xiao 7p.

“Tan Xiao was rated the top Chinese player in 2011, and has been a point getter for China in the Nongshim Cup,” says Redmond. “I am choosing this game to display Master’s peep to the 5-5 point, another move that was considered to be a bad exchange before Master played it.”

[link]

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AGA Master Review Series, Game 36: Gu Zihao 9p [W] vs. Master 9p [B]

Wednesday May 17, 2017

“Gu Zihao was born in 1998, and won the Limin Cup (youth) International tournament in 2015,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal, of the thirty-sixth game of Master (AlphaGo). “He is moving up in the rankings, 2017.05.17_AGA Master Review Series, Game 36and now is in the top 30 players in the world. Master plays its’ distinctive style in all parts of the board, with the most shocking move being an early invasion to the 3-3 point.”

[link]

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AGA Master Review Series, Game 22: Master 9p [W] vs. Chen Yaoye 9p [B]

Saturday May 13, 2017

“Chen became the youngest player to promote to 9P at 17 when he was awarded with the rank for being a finalist in two world tournaments in 2006,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal, of the twenty-second game of Master (AlphaGo). “He is still in the top handful of players, and is known for his energetic and innovative play.”

[link]

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AGA Master Review Series, Game 31: Li Qincheng 9p [W] vs. Master 9p [B]

Wednesday May 10, 2017

“Li Qincheng is a Chinese player who won the Asian TV Cup in 2016 at the age of 18, and was promoted to 9P after that,” says Michael Redmond 9p in this video commentary, hosted by Chris Garlock of the AGA E-Journal, of the thirty-first game of Master (AlphaGo). “In this game Master plays a powerful fighting game, taking control early and chasing White’s weak group around the board.”

[link]

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