American Go E-Journal » U.S./North America

Kevin Huang Tops Revived PA Open

Monday November 7, 2011

The Lancaster Go Club hosted the Pennsylvania Open last weekend for the first time in almost a decade. The venue, the Summit Grove Camp and Retreat Center, “was a hit,” reports organizer Michael Rhone II.  “It was the best value for a go tournament ever,” Keith Arnold said, “five games … two meals.  It was a total bargain.” Players came from as far away as North Carolina, Delaware, and New Jersey, and there were over twenty players in attendance, with handicaps given in some instances, but many even games were played. There were plenty of choices for dinner locations at night, and rooms were right down the hall from the playing area. “Some of us stayed up to play casual games both Friday and Saturday night,” Rhone tells the E-Journal. “A great time was had by all.”

Results
Open Section: First place: Kevin Huang; Second place: Keith Arnold
2d-3d Section: First place: Sudhir Vel
1K-5K Section: First Place: Kelsy Dyer; Second Place: Willis Huang
6K-8K Section: First Place: Terri Schurter; Second Place: Gurujeet Khalsa
9-13k Section: First Place: Bob Crites

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Ben Hakala Wins Portland Tourney

Monday November 7, 2011

Ben Hakala took top honors in the October 29-30 Portland Go Tournament. Twenty six players — including three 6-dans and a 7-dan — participated in the tournament, held on the campus of Lewis & Clark College. While organizer Peter Drake laments that “the award for top female player was not awarded, as all 26 players were male,” he reports that Akane Negishi did stop by long enough to offer KGS Plus memberships to the top single- and double-digit kyu players.” Other prizes — books, boards, etc.– were supplied by Yellow Mountain Imports and Slate & Shell, both of whom offered generous discounts. David Fotland also donated a copy of The Many Faces of Go. “Plans are already forming for next year’s tournament,” Drake adds. “The strong players inquired about the possibility of an open division. There is also the possibility of increasing the number of rounds from five to seven — more than the US Open, crammed into two days. That would be a brutal feat of mental endurance, but why not?” Drake also notes that “The tournament tools at www.goclubs.org were enormously useful, especially in reporting results quickly to the AGA.”
photo by Weitian Liu

Winners:
Dan division (first to third): Ben Hakala, Nicholas Jhirad, Vincent Zhuang
Single-digit kyu division: Louie Liu, Trey Cundall, James Moore
Double-digit kyu division: Roger LaMarche, Johnny Sajo, Cooper Stevenson
Youth: Louie Liu

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New Mississippi Club Already Expanding

Sunday November 6, 2011

The recently-launched Central Mississippi Go Club (CMGO) is expanding to the Madison/Ridgeland area, reports organizer Greg Smith. “We’ve been requested to make a location convenient to a core group of go players in the (Ridgeland) area,” Smith tells the E-Journal. “We’re happy to comply!” Every fourth Tuesday, the club will meet at the Barnes & Noble off I55. “We had a great turnout” for the club’s first meeting November 1 at The Froghead Grill (off Springridge Road in Clinton), Smith adds. “We played a few games face-to-face, taught a new person how to play go, and we all planned to do it again next week. I couldn’t ask for more.” The AGA’s “help really allowed me to assemble an easy-to-transport ‘Go Box,’  making it very easy to host a meeting with a professional feel,” said Smith. “The resources at usgo.org have been invaluable, and (the AGA’s) personal assistance made it much easier to get the specific help I needed…I’m confident CMGO will be a hub for teaching and playing go in Central Mississippi for quite a while.”
Photo: Future CMGO members Doss and Kirk play the first ever CMGO game.

 

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Jonathan Hop to Launch Go Video Site; Seeks Contributors

Sunday October 30, 2011

Go author Jonathan Hop is starting a video lecture website aimed at popularizing go and providing more resources for people who want to learn more. The website, Sunday Go Lessons “will eventually grow to have hundreds of lectures on various topics, from joseki to the middle game, and will present go in a fun and exciting way,” Hop tells the E-Journal. “Perfect for getting friends and colleagues acquainted with the game.” Looking for financial contributions from the go community to help get his dream off the ground, Hop is offering prizes for contributors, including free lectures and signed copies of his books. Jonathan Hop is a 4 dan amateur and studied at the Yu Changhyuk Baduk Dojo in Migeum, S. Korea and is also the author of the So You Want to Play Go?series, a primer for players of all skill levels. Click here for details on the new site.

 

TRENDnet Sponsors New Tournament In Southern California

Sunday October 30, 2011

Leading networking company TRENDnet is sponsoring a brand-new tournament in Southern California. The first annual TRENDnet 2011 Southern California Go Championship will be held December 3-4 in Alhambra, California, reports Orange County Go Club organizer Kevin Chao.  The five-round tournament includes a $2,000 prize pool and a $500 top prize for the open section. TRENDnet, a Torrance, CA-based global provider of award-winning networking solutions to small and medium size business and home users, has committed to sponsoring the tournament through 2013. Since its start in 1990, TRENDnet — under the slogan “Networks People Trust” — has built a diverse product line that includes wireless, fiber, wwitch, gigabit, voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), keyboard/video/mouse (KVM), Internet camera, print server, powerline, Bluetooth, storage server, power over Ethernet (PoE), and multimedia accessories.

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Shotwell Updates Computer Coverage, Challenges Kissinger

Sunday October 30, 2011

Computer go has improved dramatically in recent years, For instance, a program named “Zen” recently earned a rating of KGS 4D by playing 83 games in 24 hours at that rating, and winning 60 of them. Peter Shotwell (l) has written about computer go for years, and covers all the latest advances in a thorough update of his article available from The Bob High Memorial Library, entitled, “A Time Line of Supercomputer Go: Temporal Difference Learning to Monte Carlo Programming.”  Also available are two appendices featuring interviews with some of the more prominent programmers. Shotwell also joined the critical reaction to Henry Kissinger’s recent use of go principles to explain Chinese thinking, posting “Thoughts on the Relationship of Go to On China by Henry Kissinger and The Protracted Game by Scott Boorman,” arguing in detail that neither of the books contribute much towards understanding the basic differences between Eastern and Western history, thinking and language that are the roots of the differences in strategic outlooks, both past and present.
– Roy Laird

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Qiyun Zhu 8d Tops Lefler Memorial

Saturday October 29, 2011

Two dozen go players turned out on October 29th in Rochester, NY to play in the seventh Greg Lefler Memorial Tournament. In three rounds of play the following winners emerged: Dan Section: 1st: Qiyun Zhu 8d; 2nd: Yidong Wang 5d; 3rd: Phil Waldron 5d. High Kyu Section: 1st: James Feinup 3k; 2nd: Jim Gonella 6k; 3rd: Sean Reeves 8k. Low Kyu Section: 1st: James Howard 19k; 2nd: Patrick Wesp 13k; 3rd: Angel Lomeli 20k. The tournament is held annually to honor Rochester go organizer Greg Lefler “who taught us all to love go and to promote it in anyway we knew how,” reports Steve Colburn.
- photo courtesy Steve Colburn

 

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Traveling Board: Ed Lee & Jennie Shen Drop by the Nihon Kiin

Friday October 28, 2011

Ed Lee and Jennie Shen 2P stopped by the Nihon Kiin in Tokyo during a recent visit to Japan. “Yoda Norimoto 9P was playing in the Yuugen no Ma on the 5th floor, Kobayashi Kouichi 9P was on the 7th floor and we also ran into Michael Redmond 9P in the hallway,” Lee reports. “Jennie and I accidentally found quite a few go clubs,” during the two-week group tour October 2 – 16, with Lee’s karate sensei, “related to the 80th anniversary of Waseda University’s karate club.” Click here to see more of Lee’s photos.

Dinerchtein’s “Intense” Korean-Style Insei League

Monday October 24, 2011

Alexandre Dinerchtein’s Korean-Style Insei League on the Kiseido Go Server is a training league aimed at providing online participants with an experience similar to Dinerchtein’s insei training in Korea. Dinnerchtein, a 7-time European champion, holds a 3 dan professional ranking from Korea. Besides Dinerchtein, League teachers include Christian Pop (solaris on KGS) and Fernando Aguilar (aguilar on KGS), who are also regular teachers in KGS Plus. AGA 7 dan Andy Liu (bigbadwolf on KGS) has also participated as a teacher. The League is open to amateurs 10 kyu or stronger. “This is an intense go experience,” reports Bob Gilman 5k, who’s enrolled in the October League. “Inseis are expected to play at least 12 games during the month with at least six different opponents. In addition, the schedule for the first two weeks includes 27 lectures or simultaneous games with teachers. A few of the lectures are in Russian but most in English. Some are also likely to be at awkward times for U.S. players. Still with so many events I’ve been able to attend plenty . There are a number of US players, so finding opponents in a nearby time zone is not so much of a problem. I am enjoying it.”

Rockville Kids Discover Go

Monday October 24, 2011

Two classrooms of kids at Luxmanor Elementary School, in Rockville MD, were recently introduced to go by Edward Zhang 6d, and Justin Teng 4d. Teng, who is 15, created the project for his Eagle Scout Badge (the highest rank possible in the Boy Scouts). As the program is about leadership, Teng himself wasn’t allowed to teach directly, but he organized the demonstration, found a volunteer to teach, secured support from the Greater Washington Go Club, and oversaw all aspects of the program. “The kids walked excitedly into the classroom,” Teng told the Journal, “gazing at the mysterious objects on their desks. Some of them immediately shouted, ‘Oh! I know this game! Chinese Checkers!’ After everyone sat down and calmed down, Zhang began by showing the class a short video, and then spoke briefly about the game internationally, before moving onto basic rules such as liberties and capturing stones. Afterwards, we let the kids play Capture Go for 15 minutes. Walking around the classroom, I could immediately see that some kids picked up the game faster than others. One kid caught my eye in particular: he seemed to be that troublemaker in every class that wouldn’t go more than a few minutes without making some noise or getting out of his seat. However, when I watched him play, he immediately understood everything perfectly as he soundly trounced his opponent sitting across from him. I walked around the room a little more and saw that some kids didn’t realize that stones were taken off the board when captured, and thus there would be a mass of ‘captured’ stones on the board. To these games I declared a tie, much to the kids’ excitement as they hurriedly played another game. 30 minutes into the demo, Zhang paused the class and went over the concept of territory. The kids then played a modified version of 9×9 where each player had three stones in a third-line sanrensei formation. Most kids simply made a wall with their three stones to surround what they already had naturally surrounded on the edge, while others made a big mess filling in their own territories. Some even decided to just continue playing Capture Go as they understood that better. Whatever the case, everyone seemed to be having fun. Near the end of the demo, Edward introduced the students to the AGA website and places they could go to for learning more about go. I also offered them a copy of the Way to Go booklet, an AGA starter CD, and a 9×9 cardboard set that they could take home with them. While I didn’t have enough to give to every kid, almost every kid wanted one, which was enough to clear out pretty much exactly what I had prepared. In the near future I plan to jump start a club at the school and maybe even teach in it,” said Teng. “All of the equipment came from the AGF and was donated by the Greater Washington Go Club, it will stay at the school for use in the club,” notes Teng. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo by Justin Teng.