American Go E-Journal » U.S./North America

High School Students Could Win Free Trip to Japan

Monday October 24, 2011

Japanese American high school students are invited to apply with the Japanese Consulate for a free trip to Japan.  “I would like to introduce an invitation program for Japanese-American students by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan to you. This program invites Japanese-American students to Japan, and promotes mutual understanding between younger generations of both countries through 10 days stay in Japan,” Consul Yanagida of the Japanese Consulate in Denver, announced. Five students from all over the United States will be invited from March 9th to 20th, 2012. American high-school students whose ancestral origins are in Japan can apply to this program. For details, see the Consulate webpage.  Residents of any state can apply, but should do so to their local consulates, which are listed here.  The deadline is November 30th. - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.

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GO CLASSIFIED: Central Mississippi Go Club to Launch 11/1

Monday October 24, 2011

The new Central Mississippi Go Club — an official AGA chapter — will start playing November 1st on Tuesdays in Clinton, MS. The club is just west of Jackson, MS off Springridge Road Exit near the Natchez Trace.

Categories: U.S./North America
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AGA to hold “Go Symposium” at 2012 Go Congress

Monday October 24, 2011

The American Go Association is sponsoring the 2012 International Go Symposium, a scholarly conference to explore go’s rich educational, cultural, historical, literary, artistic and scientific dimensions. Papers are now being accepted for presentation during next year’s U.S. Go Congress in Black Mountain, NC. Selected papers will be presented by their authors in 30-minute presentations, followed by interaction with the audience. The organizers are working on a way for authors to present remotely via Skype. Anyone can submit a paper for consideration. If you are interested in submitting a paper, contact Peter Shotwell, the well-known go author who is organizing this event, at pshotwell@gmail.com. Financial sponsorship is limited, although the organizers would welcome support for this effort to improve the understanding of go through study and discourse. The 2012 IGS joins an academic tradition of go study that began in 2001, with the First International Conference on Baduk, organized by the Department of Baduk Studies at Myong-ji University. To get an idea of what’s been presented at other conferences — and perhaps be inspired to submit your own paper — the 3rd ICOB,and the 2008 Symposium on the History of Go and the Representation of Go in Art and Literature have listed their programs online, although the presentations themselves are not available. For further information contact Shotwell at pshotwell@gmail.com.
- Roy Laird

Horn Sweeps Davis-Sac Fall Tourney

Sunday October 23, 2011

Jeff Horn 1d (right) swept the October 15th Davis/Sacramento Go Club’s Fall Quarterly tournament, winning all four games. The 10-player field included first-timers Vlad Lopes-Campbell-Forbes, Zack Peach, and Shiloh Pfeifer.
- report/photo by Willard Haynes

Categories: U.S./North America
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10-Kyu Tops MGA Fall Tourney

Sunday October 23, 2011

Ralph St. Louis 10k (right) took first place in the October 16 Massachusetts Go Association Fall Tournament, held at the Boylston Chess Club in Somerville MA. St. St. Louis edged out fellow 4-0 winner Steven Wu 2d (left) to top the 28-player field. Third place went to Jason McGibbon, 4-kyu. photo by Tournament Director Eva Casey

Categories: U.S./North America
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SmartGo Books Releases Sakata’s “Killer of Go” and “Single Digit Kyu Game Commentaries” by Yuan Zhou

Sunday October 23, 2011

The out-of-print Killer of Go: Technique and Preventative Measures by Sakata Eio (published by Yutopian) is now back to life in SmartGo Books. “It’s a classic text on the theme of killing stones, featuring advice, game analysis, killing techniques, as well as shape and tewari analysis,” says SmartGo’s Anders Kierulf. The SmartGo Books edition “makes it easy to replay the moves in the diagrams,” Kierulf adds. “Moreover, twenty-seven additional diagrams replace long sequences of letters that were hard to follow in the original text.” SmartGo Books also recently released Single Digit Kyu Game Commentaries by Yuan Zhou. Earlier versions of these six commentaries were originally published in the E-Journal, but the commentaries have been significantly expanded for inclusion in SmartGo Books.

Go Spotting: The Mystery of Detective Dee and the Go Board

Saturday October 22, 2011

Les Lanphear reports that he spotted go in the 2010 China-Hong Hong epic mystery film “Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame.” “Toward the end of the movie there is a go board that seems to have 19 lines and colored pieces on the board,” says Lanphear. “The colored pieces seemed to be in the shape of chocolate kisses and in a translucent colored substance.  One of the general’s was playing with someone.  It was too short to determine if the setup was real or not.” Tsui Hark directed the fictional account of Di Renjie, one of the most celebrated officials of the Tang Dynasty and the basis for the character of Judge Dee, made famous in the West by Robert van Gulik, who wrote 17 new Judge Dee mysteries between 1946 and 1967.

Korean Pro Visits Mexico

Monday October 17, 2011

The Hankuk Kiwon (Korean Go Association) sent Chun Poong Jho 9P to Mexico this month, in honor of the XIII Iberoamerican Go Tournament. Chun has promoted go internationally for decades, and speaks several languages. Local organizer Siddhartha Avila reports: “Mr. Chun visited the Pipiolo Art School and was received by teachers, parents and students. During the day the kids presented a Mexican song performance, and we had a visit from the Public Education Zone Supervisor as well, who learned about the great benefits of teaching go in kindergarden and elementary schools.  We reported on our participation  in the AGHS School Team Tournament,  and we had the National Youth Go Tournament award ceremony, as well as a conference, lectures, and simultaneous games given by Mr. Chun to the children from first grade to sixth grade.  Mr. Chun  emphasized studying harder and said we should continue working to improve the playing level of Mexican youth, so that our top players can be invited to play at international youth tournaments. There was a rich cultural experience through a session of questions and answers about Korean and Mexican culture and of course about Baduk culture. Finally we wrapped up the event with a dinner at a typical Mexican restaurant with teachers, friends and family.” More pictures from the event are here. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo:  Chun Phoong Jho 9P inspiring youngsters in Mexico City.  Photo by Siddhartha Avila.

Young Lions Roar in November

Monday October 17, 2011

Do you have what it takes to be the leader of the pride?  Registration is now open for the Young Lions Tournament, run by the American Go Honor Society (AGHS).  Last year’s winner in the dan division, Vincent Zhuang 6d, went on to represent the US at the World Youth Go Championships.  Will this year’s tourney predict our next US Champions as well?  The tourney is scheduled for November 12-13.  Participants must be 18 or younger and have solid, KGS or AGA ranks. All matches will be played on KGS in the AGHS Tournament room (Room List –> Tournaments). Prizes will be awarded to the top three in each division. Spectators are welcome, and the E-J will highlight some of the more interesting match ups.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor

Moore and Yan Win AGF College Scholarships

Monday October 10, 2011

D’mitri Moore, of Detroit, MI, and Jasmine Yan, of  Edison, NJ, have each won $1,000 towards their college expenses, from the American Go Foundation.  The scholarship recognizes high school students who have served as important youth organizers and promoters for the go community, and is awarded annually.  Applications for next year’s scholarship are due by Nov. 20, more information can be found on the AGF website.  Moore launched a go club at his high school in inner city Detroit, and stuck with it through thick and thin over the next four years.  Moore’s essay for the scholarship speaks to his passion:“I believe that most inner-city children statistically fail to achieve, not because of their inability to comprehend, or actually do the school work, but because they are bored, because they are not being challenged on a level which forces them to think in a different manner in order to solve problems. The first person I introduced go to was one of these types.  Everyday, when we would have nothing to do, I would teach the rules of go to this student and everyday he would steadily improve bit by bit. His intrigue of the game spread like a wildfire and his drive to one-day defeat me spurred him to want to play and study more. A connection had been made and every good go player knows that once you have a strong, connected group of stones, you have to make extensions from it in order to amass more territory. When I told him that I wanted to start a club at Renaissance High in order to get more people (specifically youth) in the city of Detroit to play, he was very determined to help look for a sponsor while I filled out the paperwork. Within our first 3 months, our group size tripled and all of the kids who may have never ever noticed each other walking down the hallway were connecting and bonding like they had been friends for years.”  Moore entered his school in the AGHS School Teams Tourney, and was able to place fourth in the Jr. Varsity Division at their first tournament.

Jasmine Yan began teaching go as early as fifth grade, and launched go clubs at  both her middle, and high schools.  She led both teams to compete in the School Teams Tourney, and also became active as a teacher.  When the opportunity to volunteer came, Yan immediately joined the AGHS, and eventually was elected President.  In addition to running and organizing national tournaments, she helped with promotional efforts, and continued to teach locally the whole time. She first discovered go as a child in China, and wrote in her essay: “A few weeks after we had come back from China, I saw an advertisement for Feng Yun Go School, and I begged my parents to sign me up. However, in the first session, I was terrified to discover that I was the only girl, as well as the weakest in the class; for several weeks, I lost every game I played. Yet, during those difficult times, something about the game of Go persuaded me to keep playing. Nine years later, I have improved from 30 kyu to my current rank of 4 dan.”  Not concerned solely with her own development, Yan also began teaching go at her Chinese school.  “For the next three years, I taught the go class in FCD, with about ten to fifteen kids in each class. The first year was somewhat of an experiment for me. I learned that all the kids had different comprehension levels; some would understand the concepts taught immediately, and others took longer. Eventually, the kids in my class had ranks ranging from 1 dan to 25 kyu.”  Yan also represented her country, as part of the US National Team in the first Mind Sports Games in Beijing, in 2008.   - EJ Youth Editor Paul Barchilon.  Photos: Top Left: D’mitri Moore; Top Right: Jasmine Yan.