American Go E-Journal » World

Openings for Guo Juan Internet Go School ’13 Term

Monday December 24, 2012

Guo Juan’s Internet Go School is now accepting enrollments for its online group class for the first term of the new year. The class begins January 19-20, 2013, and participants will also receive a 20% discount on a year’s membership for Guo’s audio lectures. The school’s teaching faculty includes Guo Juan 5P, Jennie Shen 2P, Young Sun Yoon 8P and Mingjiu Jiang 7P. Click here for details and to register.

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Park Looking to Even the Score in Ing Cup; Live Commentary on Tygem Sunday Night

Saturday December 22, 2012

After Fan Ting Yu 3P’s decisive win over Park Jung-hwan 9P in the first game of the Ing Cup final, Game Two is set for Sunday evening, 8:30p EST (5:30 PST). The AGA’s Myung-wan Kim 9p will give another live commentary in English on the game, broadcast on Tygem’s World Server, which has ample capacity for everyone who wants to watch. In Game One, Fan was ahead going into the endgame, Kim said. “White did make some mistakes in the endgame, but still black could not overcome the margin, so he overplayed and the result was a disaster for black.” Game Three, along with four and five if necessary, will be played in January. photo: Myung-wan Kim at the 2012 Cotsen Open; photo by Chris Garlock

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Baduk TV English Drops Prices, Expands Options

Saturday December 22, 2012

Baduk TV English — the partnership between Baduk TV and Go Game Guru – has just introduced new pricing plans, reducing prices by as much as 60% Baduk TV Live is available for $7 per month, Baduk TV On Demand is $10/month and Baduk TV English is now $20/month. The brand-new Baduk TV Day Pass provides 1-day access to all videos for $2.70. The Baduk TV English introductory special offer — $1 for the first week of Baduk TV English, when you order a monthly subscription — ends this week, on Friday, December 21. The expanded pricing options and reduced costs are possible because of the success of the new service, says Go Game Guru’s David Ormerod. “Thank you to everyone who’s subscribed to Baduk TV and helped the service grow to this point. The support from the go community has been humbling, and it gives us the motivation we need to keep Go Game Guru going, day by day.” Click here for complete details.

Myung-wan Kim to Broadcast Live Commentary on Park-Pan Ing Cup Showdown Starting Friday Night

Friday December 21, 2012

The first two games of the Ing Cup Final between Park Jung-hwan 9P and Fan Ting-yu 3P will be featured in the next installment of Myung-wan Kim 9P’s AGA/Tygem live commentary tonight, Friday, December 21, at 8:30p EST, and then Sunday, 12/23, at the same time. Many pros give a slight edge in the match to the 19-year-old Park (left), currently number two in Korea, but expect the match-up with the Chinese 16-year-old Fan (right) to be very difficult for both players. Park, once called “the future emperor,” has started to be called “the current emperor,” says Kim, adding that “Park has completed the perfect Korean style. He has assembled every good part of a strong Korean go player’s game. Lee Sedol’s fighting spirit, Lee Chang-ho’s endgame, Cho Hun-hyun’s haengma.” Fan, meanwhile, has been called the future of China by many experts including the legendary Nie Weiping 9P. Fan started playing at age four, and in his short career — including 2,000 games as a Tygem 9d in the last five years — has put together an impressive record against professionals of all levels and a very stable game style. “He doesn’t readily collapse in any situation,” Kim said. Fan worships Lee Chang-ho. Click here for GoGameGuru’s report on the two young contenders earlier this year: Prodigies prevail at the 7th Ing Cup.

The live commentary will be set up in Tygem’s World server, which is not expected to have the problems observers experienced during the recent Samsung final. Each player gets three hours and 30 minutes to play, along with up to three overtime periods of 35 minutes each costing a two-point penalty. In theory, along with the lunch hour, a game could last 11 hours. A second phase of the best-of-five final in Singapore will take place in January and will decide who gets the $400,000 first prize and the $100,000 runner-up prize.

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2012 SportAccord World Mind Games Day 5: Choi Chulhan 9P Wins Men’s Gold, Li He 3P is Women’s Champion; Lin Chi-han 9P: The Ranka Interview

Sunday December 16, 2012

Choi Chulhan 9P Wins Men’s Gold, Li He 3P is Women’s Champion: Choi Chulhan 9P and Li He 3P are the champions of the SportAccord World Mind Games, with Choi (Korea) defeating Kang Dongwan 9P (Korea) in the Men’s Individual event and Li (China) upsetting Rui Naiwei 9P (China) in the Women’s Individual on December 16.  Click here to download Michael Redmond’s commentaries on both games.
Game Commentary: Round 7 (Men’s Individual Final): Choi-Kang
This is an all-Korean final for the 2012 SAWMG Men’s Individual title. The players are top Korean players who have confidence in their reading abilities, which are on full display in this exciting game.
Game Commentary: Round 7 (Women’s Individual Final): Choi-Kang
Rui is a strong fighter, as well as a tenacious player. She’s been at or close to the top of the women’s game for quite a while now. Li, on the other hand, is a new young player who’s recently become very prominent in women’s go.

Lin Chi-han 9P: The Ranka Interview: Chinese Taipei’s Lin Chi-han 9P – who won the third-place bronze medal at this year’s SportAccord World Mind Sports Games — started playing go when he was about six years old. “My uncle could play go, and Mother thought it would be good for me to learn,” he said. When he was about nine or ten he started taking lessons from Lin Sheng-hsian, a 7-dan pro. He became a professional in 2000; he also began studying business administration at Taiwan National University around then. “I graduated in 2004, but I had already starting winning professional tournaments and was committed to a professional career,” Lin said. “My university training may prove useful later when it comes to investing my earnings, but it has not been of any direct use to me as a go player.” When he’s not playing or teaching go, Lin is a big NBA fan. Click here for Ranka’s full interview. photo by Ivan Vigano

Game Commentary: Round 6: Missingham-Kovaleva
Women’s Individual

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W: Joanne Missingham 6P (Taipei)
B: Natalia Kovaleva 5D (Russia)
Commentary: Michael Redmond 9P
Edited by Chris Garlock

I saw Kovaleva in Japan recently at the Pair Go Championships, where she and her partner were among the stronger pairs, and she did well here this week in the SportAccord World Mind Games Women’s Individual event.

In this game against Joanne Missingham 6P, Kovaleva’s attack backfires when Missingham counter-attacks with a devastating ko.

 

2012 SportAccord World Mind Games Day 4: Men’s & Women’s Finals Set for Sunday; Semi-Finals; Game Commentary: Round 6: Lin-Kang

Saturday December 15, 2012

Men’s & Women’s Finals Set for Sunday: The men’s final  in the 2012 SportsAccord World Mind Sports Games is an all-Korea final with Kang Dongyoon 9P against Choi Chulhan 9P, while the women’s is all-Chinese, as Li He faces Rui Naiwei in the final round, which will be played at 3p (local time) on Sunday, December 16. Watch for live broadcast on Cyberoro and Michael Redmond’s game commentary on the SAWMG Channel

Semi-Finals: Round 6 began after lunch on December 15, with the same eight players playing as in the fifth round that morning. This was the round that would decide third, fourth, and fifth places. On the top board China’s Lin Chi-han was playing Korea’s Kang Dongyoon, the winner to proceed into the men’s gold/silver medal final, the loser to take the third-place bronze medal. On the next board China’s Chen Yaoye was playing Korea’s Park Jeonghwan, the winner to finish fourth, the loser fifth. Beside them a similar fourth-fifth place playoff was set up in the women’s division, Chinese Taipei’s Joanne Missingham playing Russia’s Natalia Kovaleva. On the last board, China’s Rui Naiwei faced Korea’s Choi Jeong in the women’s medal battle. Michael Redmond gave the players their starting instructions before heading to the YouTube broadcast booth to comment on the Kang-Lin game. In other World Mind Games news, the day ended with medals for the Open and Women’s Bridge Team and Women and Men Chess Blitz competitions; details on the SAWMG siteClick here for Ranka’s full report, which includes Round 6 results. photo by Ivan Vigano

Game Commentary: Round 6: Lin-Kang

December 15, 2012

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W: Chi-Han Lin 9P (Chinese Taipei)
B: Dongyoon Kang (Korea)
Commentary: Michael Redmond 9P
Edited by Chris Garlock

The winner of this game goes to the final, against Choi Chulhan 9P, with the 2012 SportAccord World Mind Games title and $100,000 on the line.

2012 SportAccord World Mind Games Day 3: Round 4: Final Knockouts; Interview with Bill Lin; Game Commentary: Round 4: Park-Missingham

Saturday December 15, 2012

Round 4: Final Knockouts
After lunch on Friday, December 14, the players began to head for the playing room for the final games of the main men’s and women’s knockouts and six games in the repechage (loser’s) sections.The playing room was set up with the women’s games in the front row and the men’s games in back. The television cameras were trained on the game between Korea’s Park Jieun and Chinese Taipei’s Joanne Missingham in the women’s repechage. In the TV commentator’s booth just outside the playing room, Michael Redmond 9P (at left in photo) and American Go E-Journal Managing Editor — and IGS SAWMG Media Officer — Chris Garlock (right)  were giving a live commentary — available on the SAWMG Channel — on this game for a worldwide audience on 54 platforms in countries from Afghanistan on down. The two players obliged them by playing at a brisk pace in the opening.For the second straight day China’s unbeaten Chen Yaoye found himself facing a Korean opponent. Today it was Choi Chulhan, also unbeaten in the World Mind Games. Click here for Ranka’s full report, which includes Round 4 results. photo by Ivan Vigano

Interview with Bill Lin: Canada’s Bill (Tianyu) Lin was one of the first four players to be eliminated, losing to China’s Jiang Weijie in round 1 and Chinese Taipei’s Lin Chun-yen in round 2. Lin was born in Ningbo, a city south of Shanghai and his family emigrated to Vancouver when he was ten. “My father had been crazy about go in his university days, and there was a go board in the house,” Lin says. “I became very interested in playing five-in-a-row, and then I started playing go. An amateur 5-dan named Fan Jiunling had a go school that I attended twice a week for four and a half years until we emigrated. By then I was an amateur 3 dan in China.” Click here to read James Davies’ complete interview on Ranka. photo: Bill Lin (right) playing against Jiang Weijie; photo by Ivan Vigano

Game Commentary: Round 4: Park-Missingham

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December 14, 2012
W: Jieun PARK 9P (Korea)
B: Joanne MISSINGHAM 6P (Chinese Taipei)
Commentary by Michael Redmond 9P
Edited by Chris Garlock

This is a critical game because whoever loses will be knocked out; this is a double-elimination tournament and both players have one loss.

Joanne Missingham, born in Australia,lived in California for a few years and now represents Taipei; she’s also the official Go Ambassador at the SAWMG.

Park Jieun was one of the first Korean female players to really challenge Rui Naiwei when Rui was playing in Korea. So she’s been one of the top Korean players for quite a while now, and she’d be favored to win this match.

2012 SportAccord World Mind Games Day 2: Round 2: The Elimination Round; Round 3: Then There Were 24; Game Commentary: Round 3, Chen-Park (China-Korea)

Thursday December 13, 2012

Round 2: The Elimination Round
Round 2 of the SportAccord World Mind Games began at 9:30 a.m. on December 12. Outside, the ground was still covered with snow, but the temperature was pleasantly warm within the playing venue at the Beijing International Convention Center. All 16 men were competing, eight in the main section, eight in the repechage, or loser’s bracket; as this is a double-elimination tournament, four of these players would be out after this round. Eight of the 12 women were competing, including the four seeded players who had byes in the first round and the four who had won their first-round games. In the men’s division, two games promised to be particularly noteworthy. One was the match between China’s Jiang Weijie (left, in photo at right) and Korea’s Kang Dongyoon (right); click here to download the game record, which includes detailed commentary by Michael Redmond 9P. Jiang’s triumphs so far this year have included the LG Cup, the Dachongjiu Cup, and the China-Japan-Korea Mingren-Meijin-Myung-in playoff. Kang won the men’s individual event at the 2008 World Mind Sports Games in Beijing, the 2009 Fujitsu Cup, and the 2009 Korean Chunwon title. The other particularly noteworthy game was the match between Czechia’s Jan Hora (left, in photo at left) and Hungary’s Csaba Mero (right) in the repechage section. The winner of that game would advance to the third round and at least double his monetary prize. In the women’s division, the two Chinese players were playing the two Japanese, and the two Koreans were playing the two from Chinese Taipei. In the men’s repechage section, Russia’s Ilya Shikshin, Argentina’s Fernando Aguilar, and Canada’s Tianyu (Bill) Lin faced tough matches against China’s Tuo Jiaxi and Chinese Taipei’s Lin Chi-han and Lin Chun-yen; for the losers of these games, the tournament would be over. Click here for Ranka’s full report.

Round 3: Then There Were 24
Round 3 started at 3:00 p.m. on December 12th, with twelve men and all twelve women competing. In the undefeated men’s section, China’s Chen Yaoye was matched against Korea’s Park Jeonghwan, and Koreans Choi Chulhan and Kang Dongyoon were matched against each other. In the undefeated women’s section, China’s Rui Naiwei was matched against Korea’s Park Jieun, a player who had occasionally managed to defeat her in title matches when Rui was playing professionally in Korea, and China’s Li He was matched against Korea’s teenaged Myung-in Choi Jeong. Most players took their seats early. Rui Naiwei and Choi Jeong spent the pre-game minutes meditating with closed eyes.In the repechage sections, the eight players who survived to advance into the fourth round were: Lin Chi-han of Chinese Taipei, who eliminated Csaba Mero of Hungary (‘His reading was too fast for me to keep up with,’ commented Mero); Lin Chun-yen (above at left) of Chinese Taipei, who surprisingly eliminated Tuo Jiaxi of China, setting up a match between the two remaining Lin’s in the fourth round, ensuring that at least one player from Chinese Taipei will reach the fifth round; Jiang Weijie of China, who eliminated Murakawa Daisuke of Japan by winning a fight in the middle of the board; Fujita Akihiko of Japan, who eliminated countrymate Uchida Shuhei; Mukai Chiaki of Japan, who eliminated Su Sheng-fang of Chinese Taipei; Joanne Missingham of Chinese Taipei, who stormed back from her morning loss to eliminate Okuda Aya of Japan; Natalia Kovaleva of Russia, who eliminated Irene Sha of Canada in a long fighting game that ended with no groups dead but many groups reduced to just two eyes and Kovaleva slightly ahead; and Vanessa Wong of Great Britain, who eliminated Rita Pocsai of Hungary, whom she had also beaten in the European Women’s Championship this year. Click here for Ranka’s full report.

Game Commentary: Round 3: Chen-Park
December 13, 2012
W: CHEN Yaoye 9P (China)
B: PARK Jeonghwan 9P (Korea)
Commentary: Michael Redmond 9P
Edited by Chris Garlock

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Park is one of the top Korean players; he’s been on the international scene for several years. He’s a steady player with no obvious weak points. Chen’s also a top player from China; he’s very knowledgeable about some of the more complicated josekis so his opening can sometimes be quite interesting. On the whole, I think he’s a strong fighting player, and we certainly will see that in this game.

 

Lee Sedol Edges Gu Li to Win 17th Samsung Cup

Thursday December 13, 2012

On December 13, Lee Sedol 9p defeated Gu Li 9p 2-1, to win the match and the title, at the 17th Samsung Cup. Lee Sedol won the first game of the match on December 11 by half a point in an upset win. Gu Li seemed to be dispirited after losing, but he won the next game on the following day (December 12), scoring a one sided victory over Lee. The following day, Lee Sedol played black in the final, and he took an early lead for the first time in the series. However, Gu Li’s middle game was excellent and he managed to reverse the game. After Gu took the lead, however, he made some tiny mistakes in the endgame and Lee was able to claw his way back, little by little. The game became incredibly close, at which point Gu made a crucial endgame mistake, and Lee eventually reversed the game to win by half a point. As a result, Lee won the final series by a total of just 1 point — half a point each in his two wins –to take home the 17th Samsung Cup.
- Adapted from GoGameGuru 

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Live! from the 2012 SportAccord World Mind Games

Wednesday December 12, 2012

The 2012 SportAccord World Mind Games (SAWMG) have begun in Beijing, China. Click here for live coverage — including game commentary by Michael

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Redmond 9P (see right for Redmond’s commentary on the Round 1 game between Russia’s Ilya Shiksin 7d and Daisuke Murakawa 7P) and E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock’s interviews with players and officials on the SAWMG website; live results and schedule here. For Ranka’s reports, click here.