American Go E-Journal » Search Results » learn go week

Facebook AI “OpenGo” to play simuls at 2018 U.S. Go Congress 

Monday June 4, 2018

Maker:0x4c,Date:2017-9-5,Ver:4,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar01,E-Y

Artificial Intelligence has taken go into new realms and this year at the US Go Congress attendees will be able to learn and improve their own games by playing against one of the new generation of AI players.  Facebook’s OpenGo, which features a 20-0 record against top-30 professionals, will be playing teaching simuls early in the week.

The simuls will be held on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday afternoons (July 22, 23, and 24) with OpenGo playing 20 simultaneous no-handicap teaching games each day. Each player will be mailed an SGF file after the game with annotations from OpenGo.

Participants will play on physical boards, with volunteers relaying the moves to and from OpenGo. The Congress organizers expect high demand for the 60 simultaneous playing slots and are offering the opportunity first to those who have completed their Congress registration by June 20. If more than 60 of those registrants wish to play against OpenGo, a lottery will be held for the seats.

To sign up, select the OpenGo Simul event as part of your registration on the Go Congress websiteIf you’ve already registered, go to “My Account,” click on an attendee name, then find the “Simul against Facebook OpenGo” section to add the event to your registration. If you haven’t already registered, select the event as part of your new attendee registration.

The schedule of events has been added to the Congress mobile app along with other events and lots of information about the Congress. It is available as a free download for iOS and Android devices.

Share

“Twitch Plays Go” broadcast introduces the game to thousands 

Monday April 30, 2018

Streaming giant Twitch.tv’s all-day livestream about go attracted nearly 20,000 viewers last Saturday. “Being able to introduce so many people to the game in such a unique way was a thrill,” said Hajin Lee, the former professional player2018.04.30 Twitch_Plays_Go-IMG_1229 and popular commentator.

The broadcast was hosted by Lee, Twitch streamer Stephen Hu, and directors of the “Surrounding Game” documentary Will Lockhart and Cole Pruitt, and featured a variety of go content for beginners as well as more experienced players.

2018.04.30 Twitch_Plays_Go-screenshotLockhart and Pruitt kicked off the broadcast with a segment on the rules of go (left). Next viewers enjoyed a special showing of The Surrounding Game, during which the twitch chat-room was abuzz with comments. “It was so much fun to follow the chat as the movie played” says Lockhart. “Part-way through, we were elevated to the featured video on Twitch’s front page, and all of a sudden the number of live viewers jumped to over 15 thousand!” Viewership hit a high of 17,500 during the livestream.

After the film, Lockhart hosted an interactive 9×9 game between the Twitch audience and Hajin Lee 4p (Haylee), in which viewers could vote between move options. With just a 2-stone handicap, the audience fought valiantly, but in the end the pro prevailed. “Although most of the audience was new to go, the chat consistently chose better options,” said Lee. “I think this interactive group play format has a great potential as a beginner class tool.”

2018.04.30 Twitch_Plays_Go-teamThe broadcast continued with live commentary on back-to-back high-level tournament games.  Stephen Hu 6d joined Haylee to cast the semi-finals of the 2018 Creator’s Invitational Tournament between Justin Teng 6d (USA) and Peter Marko (Hungary). In the end Marko eked out a 0.5-point win, advancing to face winner Norman Tsai and Stephen Hu himself in the CIT finals next week.

Pruitt returned to host the final segment: the Collegiate Go League Championship. The strength of the West Coast was in full display, with UCLA and UC Irvine competing in the finals. In an exciting and dramatic result, with boards 2 and 3 split, the championship was decided by the board 1 result with another 0.5-point game. Shengjie Zhou 6d of UC Irvine escaped with the narrowest of victories over UCLA’s Cheng-Yi Huang 3p to notch Irvine’s first CGL championship.

“This was a tremendous opportunity to promote go,” said Hu. “Thanks to everyone who participated, and to BattsGo, the National Go Center, CatsPlayGo, and many more for providing entertaining promos for their channels.”

If you missed the livestream, an archived version of the “learn to play” segment is here and the rest of the stream is here.

 

Share
Categories: Main Page,World
Share

New York Go Expo set for this weekend in NYC

Monday February 12, 2018

The 2018 New York Go Expo will take place this weekend, February 17-18 in Manhattan at the China Institute (40 Rector St,2018.02.12_ny-go-expo_orig 2FL, New York).

The Go Expo is aimed both at go players and the general public. Aside from the invited team tournament, the Expo will emphasize creativity and collaboration, “especially when go is tied seamlessly with education,” says organizer Stephanie Yin. “Our goal is to pair all interested attendees in a simultaneous game with a strong go player.”

The Expo is free to the general public. A repertoire of events revolving around go will be held, from beginner to advanced, and players of all ages are encouraged to attend. “We’d like to see our participants learn, share, and advance in and outside of go,” says Yin.

Besides the pro activities and other go-related activities, the first Dreamworks School Invitational will take place at the Expo. Mrs. Liao is sponsoring this tournament and wishes to provide an opportunity for the younger generation for youth players in New York to meet current students in esteemed universities such as in the Ivy League Schools. She wishes that participants can learn, share experience, and improve, in and outside of Go. She also encourages go to be introduced into children’s studies.

Teams have been invited from universities including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Brown, Cornell, Columbia, the University of Chicago, the University of Toronto, as well as the American Collegiate Go Association, and the New York Institute of Go, which will also field a NYIG Wildcard team.

Click here for details.

Share

2017 US Go Congress preview

Saturday July 29, 2017

With just a week left before the 33rd US Go Congress kicks off next Saturday at the Town and Country Resort in San Diego, California, the schedule for the week-long event is finally complete, reports Congress Co-Director Ted Terpstra. Currently there are 531 registered attendees including 26 professional go players. 2017.07.29_SD-airport-stones

There will be a ten-session Go Teachers’ Workshop for those wanting to learn the optimal ways of teaching go in the classroom. Many of the teachers’ session will be given by Myungwan Kim, 9P. Coordinating the workshop is Jonathan Hop <yithril@gmail.com>.

For young very-strong players, there will be a 10-session workshop sponsored and run by the Nihon-Kiin professionals: Yashashiro, 9P and Tsuruta 4P. Coordinating the very-strong players workshop is Ihan Lui <ihan.lui@gocongress.org>.

Each afternoon and evening after the US Open rounds (Sunday-Friday, except Wednesday), there will be lectures and game analysis by the more than 20 professional players from around the world. There will be sessions for the best players as well as the new players who are starting their climb to the top.

A special set of go classes will be given by European go teacher, In-seong Hwang <admin@yunguseng.com>. His lecture topics include Let’s get the Go-Avengers (includes Thor vs Hulk, Iron Man vs Black Widow and Captain America vs Nick Fury), Let’s make Go Easier and AlphaGo Games, the Future of Go.

“The summer in San Diego has been pleasant with almost no rain,” says Terpstra. The five-day forecast is for high temperatures of 77, 76, 77, 77, and 77 degrees, “Perfect for swimming in one of the three swimming pools at the Town and Country Resort. It should be a fine US Go Congress.”

photo: large white go stones embedded in the wall of the building next to the car rental facility at the San Diego Airport; photo by Ted Terpstra

Share

In surprise announcement, AlphaGo retires; DeepMind to release 50 self-play games

Saturday May 27, 2017

AlphaGo is retiring. DeepMind’s Demis Hassabis and David Silver made the stunning announcement as the Future of Go Summit wrapped up in Wuzhen, China, saying that the match against world #1 Ke Jie represented “the highest possible pinnacle for AlphaGo as a competitive program” and would be the AI program’s final match.2017.05.27_alphago

“The research team behind AlphaGo will now throw their considerable energy into the next set of grand challenges, developing advanced general algorithms that could one day help scientists as they tackle some of our most complex problems, such as finding new cures for diseases, dramatically reducing energy consumption, or inventing revolutionary new materials,” Hassabis said. “If AI systems prove they are able to unearth significant new knowledge and strategies in these domains too, the breakthroughs could be truly remarkable. We can’t wait to see what comes next.”

DeepMind isn’t leaving the go community empty-handed, however. As a “special gift to fans of Go around the world,” DeepMind is publishing a special set of 50 AlphaGo vs AlphaGo games, which Hassabis and Silver said “we believe contain many new and interesting ideas and strategies for the Go community to explore.”

And while DeepMind doesn’t plan to give AlphaGo itself a wide release, Hassabis says he’s more than happy for others to make use of DeepMind’s research themselves. Programs like Tencent’s Fine Art and Japan’s DeepZenGo have used similar deep-learning techniques to achieve around 9th-dan level, according to Hassabis. DeepMind will soon publish another paper on how it architected the latest version of AlphaGo, AlphaGo Master, and Hassabis expects other companies to learn from the new research.

Also, Hassabis said that “We’re also working on a teaching tool – one of the top requests we’ve received throughout this week. The tool will show AlphaGo’s analysis of Go positions, providing an insight into how the program thinks, and hopefully giving all players and fans the opportunity to see the game through the lens of AlphaGo. We’re particularly honoured that our first collaborator in this effort will be the great Ke Jie, who has agreed to work with us on a study of his match with AlphaGo. We’re excited to hear his insights into these amazing games, and to have the chance to share some of AlphaGo’s own analysis too.”

Read more in The Verge and on the DeepMind website. photo courtesy The Verge

Share

Ke Jie: AlphaGo “like a god of Go”

Tuesday May 23, 2017

Excerpted and adapted from a report in The New York Times 

“Last year, (AlphaGo) was still quite humanlike when it played,” said Ke Jie 9P after the first match against the go-playing AI Tuesday. “But this year, it became like a god of Go.”
“AlphaGo is improving too fast,” Ke said in a news conference after the game. “AlphaGo is like a different player this year compared to last 2017.05.23_24alphago-master768year.”
Mr. Ke, who smiled and shook his head as AlphaGo finished out the game, said afterward that his was a “bitter smile.” After he finishes this week’s match, he said, he would focus more on playing against human opponents, noting that the gap between humans and computers was becoming too great. He would treat the software more as a teacher, he said, to get inspiration and new ideas about moves.
Chinese officials perhaps unwittingly demonstrated their conflicted feelings at the victory by software backed by a company from the United States, as they cut off live streams of the contest within the mainland even as the official news media promoted the promise of artificial intelligence.
2017.05.23_AlphaGO_hassabis

Excerpted from Wired 
This week’s match is AlphaGo’s first public appearance with its new architecture, which allows the machine to learn the game almost entirely from play against itself, relying less on data generated by humans. In theory, this means DeepMind’s technology can more easily learn any task.
Underpinned by machine learning techniques that are already reinventing everything from internet services to healthcare to robotics, AlphaGo is a proxy for the future of artificial intelligence.
This was underlined as the first game began and (DeepMind CEO Demis) Hassabis (in photo) revealed that AlphaGo’s new architecture was better suited to tasks outside the world of games. Among other things, he said, the system could help accelerate the progress of scientific research and significantly improve the efficiency of national power grids.

DeepMind Match 1 wrap up
2017.05.23_ke-jie-hassabis“There was a cut that quite shocked me,” said Ke Jie, “because it was a move that would never happen in a human-to-human Go match. But, afterwards I analyzed the move and I found that it was very good. It is one move with two or even more purposes. We call it one stone, two birds.”
“Ke Jie started with moves that he had learned from the Master series of games earlier this year, adding those new moves to his repertoire,” said Michael Redmond 9P. “Ke Jie used the lower board invasion point similar to AlphaGo in the Masters games, and this was a move that was unheard of before then. Although this was one of the most difficult moves for us to understand, in the last month or players have been making their own translations and interpretations of it.”
“Every move AlphaGo plays is surprising and is out of our imagination,” said Stephanie Yin 1P. “Those moves completely overthrow the basic knowledge of Go. AlphaGo is now a teacher for all of us.”

photos: (top) courtesy China Stringer Network, via Reuters (middle) Noah Sheldon/Wired (bottom) DeepMind

Share

Hold an AlphaGo Match Viewing and Kibitzing Party

Wednesday May 17, 2017

Next week’s face off between Ke Jie 9p and DeepMind’s updated AlphaGo software promises to be more than a long-awaited grudge match (“One small bleep for a computer, one giant push for mankind,” commented AGA President Andy Okun). It will also be be a chance to think about the future of go. Moves suggested by AlphaGo have already become common in online and professional tournament play as players build, break and rebuild their opening and middle game theories. “More than anything else, then, this is a chance to learn new things about the game by analyzing, commenting on, arguing about and playing over the moves thrown off in the brawling between China’s fearsome slugger and Google’s triumph of modern engineering,” Okun said. “We should do this together.” To this end, any chapter that holds an AlphaGo viewing party during next week’s event is eligible for $100 of (non-alcohol) expenses supported by the AGA president’s discretionary chapter rewards points pool, in addition to using their own points. Since the games are in Asia and may be late at night, watching online later is fine. Conditions are that the chapter is current, that more than a couple of people attend, that it be before May 30, and that you send the EJ a notice of the event beforehand so we can put word out about it, and an account of the event and a couple of pictures. Send questions to president@usgo.org.

Share
Categories: Uncategorized
Share

AGA Go Camp Set for Week Before Congress – Outside San Diego

Thursday March 30, 2017

DSCN3691 copyThe AGA Go Camp is moving west this year, and will be held at Schoepe Scout Camp at Lost Valley, just outside of San Diego, from July 30th to August 5th.  Myungwan Kim 9P will return as the instructor, and Fernando Rivera, Wenguang Wang, and Yanping Zhao will be camp directors.  The location, in the mountains above Anza-Borrego State Park, and surrounded by 1,500 acres of national forest, will give kids a taste of the outdoors. The camp features many activities, including high-wire walking, hiking trails, horse-back riding, two swimming pools, boating, and shooting ranges. “During our drive around the camp, I saw herds of deer wandering about. Birds, and other critters are frequent visitors of the camp also,” reports Congress Director Ted Terpstra. “There are native American artifacts on site including rocks where they ground the grain into flour. This is the flagship camp of the Boy Scouts in southern California. I was impressed with the care that has gone into the maintenance of the facilities. It certainly gives an entirely different feeling compared  to the packed freeways of southern California.” Camp will be the week before the US Go Congress, and a two hour drive from the site.  Youth of all ranks can come and learn from a pro, improve their skills, and then come to compete in the US Open the following week.  Airport pick up is available in San Diego for unaccompanied minors. The AGF is again offering a range of scholarships.  Youth who played in either the Redmond Cup or the NAKC are eligible for $400 scholarships, and the winning teams in the School Teams Tournament will also receive full scholarships to camp. For more info about the location click here, for pricing and registration info, click here. - Paul Barchilon EJ Youth Editor.  Photo by Ted Terpstra.

Share

Chicago High School Runs First Tourney

Friday March 17, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 4.40.14 PMDisney II Magnet High School, in Chicago, IL, held their first go tournament on Feb 7th, to celebrate the Spring Festival, or Lunar New Year of 2017. More than 30 students from 7th to 12th grade registered for the 4-week single-elimination tournament. The final four winners were Calvin Huang, Edgar Venegas, Isaac Smith and Alejandro Hernandez, from 9th and 11th grade.

“We bring different cultural activities into our world language classrooms,” reports Ming Laoshi, Chinese teacher and tournament organizer at the school. “I chose this game from Go and Math Academy in 2015, and then my students fell in love with it. Nowadays, I even use go as the classroom activity when I need a substitute teacher.”

“Go can be used to support goals in the Chinese curriculum,” adds Xinming Simon Guo, of Go and Math Academy, “particularly to enhance understanding of Chinese culture and to reinforce learning language skills (numbers, colors, shapes, positions and locations, timing, etc). Research shows that nonlinguistic representation can have a powerful effect on students’ vocabulary development. Go has numerous vocabularies that can be visually represented on the board and playing go can be aligned with the five major language learning standards — Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.”

“Organizing a tournament in the school setting turned out to be really easy,” reports Laoshi, “it started with a small budget. After setting up, all I needed to do was email students a pairing notice every week and enter the results in a Google spreadsheet.” The school plans to organize another  tournament next year, when every student can have an opportunity to play in every round. -Paul Barchilon EJ Youth Editor. Photo by Xinming Guo:Disney II tournament winners and Chinese language teacher Ming.

Share

Go Classified: Go Players Wanted in Manassas, Delaware and Tennessee

Wednesday September 7, 2016

Manassas VA players wanted: Beginning player looking for others to learn from and to play with in the Manassas VA area. Please contact Bill at billmcfa@yahoo.com

Delaware Go Players Wanted: Southern Delaware area; email vegagirl.mj@gmail.com

Players Wanted — Northeast Tennessee: I am looking for people to play in person in northeast Tenn. My rank is 5 kyu on KGS, and I live in Johnson City. I might be open to teaching someone new but would prefer someone close to my rank. Please contact Tom at tjroncoli@yahoo.com, and we can play on a weeknight or on weekends at a cafe or restaurant.

 

Share