Welcome to the American Go Association

Upcoming Go Events: Carmichael and New York

Monday August 19, 2019

August 31: Carmichael, CA
Davis/Sacramento Fall Quarterly Tournament
Willard Haynes cwillardhaynes2@gmail.com 916-929-6112 or 916-601-0829

August 31: New York, NY
2019 U20 Eastern Youth Open
Stephanie Yin td-nyig@gmail.com 646-287-9536

Get the latest go events information.

Share
Categories: Calendar,Main Page
Share

ArenaGo: New Go Database App

Saturday August 17, 2019

ArenaGo is a new Android app that contains over 50,000 professional matches searchable by player, country or date. Nice stone graphics, flags to represent nationality, and the ability to select favorite players might interest go enthusiasts. Users can manually advance through games or choose an adjustable auto-play speed. Game records are current as of 7/27/2019 with over 1,400 players and 23 countries represented.

The following link will take you to the app in the Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.arenago.android

An IOS version is under development.

-editing and screenshots by Ryan Woolgar

Share

Go Spotting: Chazen Museum of Art

Wednesday August 14, 2019

“During Go Congress, I visited the Chazen Museum of Art at UW and found this Japanese print,” writes Li Ping. “It is a Samurai standing on top of a Go set.”

The woodcut is by Katsukawa Shunshô, who was known for “his widely influential nise-e (“likeness painting”) or nigao (“likenesses”), which were stylized but otherwise accurate facial likenesses of actors. These introduced a greater measure of realism and individuation into ukiyo-e actor portraits.” (Source.)

The Actor Ichikawa Danjuro V as a Samurai in a Wrestling Arena
Katsukawa Shunsho (Japanese, 1726 – 1792) "The Actor Ichikawa Danjuro V as a Samurai in a Wrestling Arena" ca. 1780 Color woodcut Bequest of John H. Van Vleck
Katsukawa Shunsho (Japanese, 1726 – 1792) “The Actor Ichikawa Danjuro V as a Samurai in a Wrestling Arena” ca. 1780 Color woodcut Bequest of John H. Van Vleck

-edited by Nate Eagle

Share

Upcoming Go Events: Santa Fe and Quebec

Monday August 12, 2019

August 17: Santa Fe, NM
Santa Fe Summer Go Tournament
Robert Cordingley rjcord1@gmail.com 281-989-6272

August 18-23: Mount Orford National Park, Quebec
Summer 2019 Go Camp – CGA
James Sedwick president@go-canada.org

Get the latest go events information.

Share
Categories: Calendar,Main Page
Share

Go Spotting: National Gallery features two scenes by Japanese artists involving games of go

Saturday August 10, 2019

Former AGA President Allan Abramson spotted games of go in two scenes currently on display in the East wing of the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Horses and Grooms in the Stable

Muromachi period, early 1500s
pair of six-panel screens; ink, color, and gold on paper

The Cleveland Museum of Art, Edward L. Whittemore Fund

“Fine horses were treasured assets for military commanders, who built elaborate stables to house them. A Portuguese priest who visited Japan during the Edo period noted that such stables were spotlessly clean, elaborate structures where members of the elite could entertain, as shown here. Guests sit on tatami mats and play the board games go or shogi (similar to chess) while falconers watch over their hawks and grooms attend to the spirited horses. Monkeys, thought to draw illness away from horses, appear in the panels to the right of the go or shogi players.”

The Cleveland Museum of Art has a high-res version of the entire scene.

Warrior Minamoto Raiko and the Earth Spider

Utagawa Kuniyoshi
1798 – 1861

Edo period, 1843
triptych, woodblock print
Los Angeles County Museum of Art,
The Joan Elizabeth Tanney Bequest

The Earth or Dirt Spider

“Families that rebelled against the emperor were disparaged as ‘dirt spiders’ (tsuchigumo) in some ancient Japanese texts. In the popular imagination, the term was taken literally to refer to a giant, ground-dwelling arachnid. In Kuniyoshi’s print, the Earth Spider tries to ensnare in its web a famous but ailing warrior, Minamoto Raiko (948 – 1021), whose four bodyguards sip sake and play board games. The artist used the story to satirize the harshness of the government in his own day. When the print was issued in 1843, viewers understood that the sick Raiko was a stand-in for the unpopular current shogun, and the horde of demons symbolized the down-trodden townspeople.

“In Yoshitsuya’s version of the story, Raiko’s bodyguards or generals lower themselves in baskets into the cave of the Earth Spider and its serpent companion. The monster glares at the intruders with its green, bulging eyes, while countless small spiders crawl over its body. Despite the odds against them, the bodyguards ultimately slay the Earth Spider. Their victory inspired a centuries-old Noh play, Tsuchigumo, that was adapted for Kabuki theater.”

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston has a high-quality version of the triptych here.

-edited by Nate Eagle

Share
Categories: Go Spotting,Main Page
Share

Problem of the Week

Common Tesujis

Black to play