American Go E-Journal » China

Strong Young North American Player Sought For Brand-New Hangzhou Tournament

Thursday December 4, 2014

The AGA has just received a request to send a young North American (US or Canadian) player to Hangzhou, China, for the new Li Min Cup 2014.12.04-Hangzhou-Tianyuan-Tower-DSC_8259-199x300World Best Go Star Championship Finals from December 18 to 24, AGA President Andy Okun reports to the EJ. The player, who can be a citizen or permanent resident, should meet the AGA’s eligibility requirements and must have been born after Jan. 1, 1991. Food and lodging are being provided by the organizers along with travel expenses of up to 10,000 RMB (about $1,600).

“While this is a last-minute thing, I have been to Hangzhou and this is a trip worth making if at all possible,” Okun said. The venue of the tournament, Hangzhou Qiyuan’s Tianyuan Tower, is a 34-floor go-themed luxury hotel with a major go school and library and a go museum in the lobby (THE TRAVELING GO BOARD: HANGZHOU’S TOWER OF GO 5/27/2010 EJ). Interested players should respond as soon as possible to Okun at and Cherry Shen at If there are multiple interested players, a quick play-off may be held.


Korea Shuts Out China at the 19th LG Cup

Thursday November 20, 2014

19th LG Cup 2014Four of China and Korea’s best faced off at the 19th LG Cup quarter and semifinals on November 17 through November 19 in Gangwon, Korea. Though they performed poorly last year, team Korea (left) dominated this year’s tournament with each player knocking out their Chinese counterpart including Kim Jiseok 9p’s win against defending champion Tuo Jiaxi 9p. Kim will play good friend Park Junghwan 9p in the finals from February 9 through February 12 at Seoul National University. For more information about the 19th LG Cup including photos, game records, and commentary by An Younggil 8p, please visit Go Game Guru.
–Annalia Linnan, based on a longer article by Go Game Guru; photo courtesy of Go Game Guru


Kim Jiseok 9p to Challenge Tang Weixing 9p in Samsung Cup Finals

Sunday November 9, 2014

Kim Jiseok 9pThe 2014 Samsung Cup semifinals finished on November 7 in Daejeon, Korea with Korea’s number two player Kim Jiseok 9p (left) to face defending champion Tang Weixing 9p. Kim’s rise to the top included solid wins against the top Chinese player Shi Yue 9p. Meanwhile, Tang was forced to play three intense games as himself and Korea’s top player Park Junghwan 9p trapped each other in many complicated territory battles.
Though Kim and Tang have played four other games together (Kim in the lead at 3-1), the 2014 Samsung Cup finals will be Kim’s first appearance in an international final. The match will take place on December 9 through December 11 in Xian, China. For more information about the semifinals including photos and game records, please visit Go Game Guru.
–Annalia Linnan, based on a longer article by Go Game Guru 



Go Spotting: US Army War College Quarterly

Sunday November 2, 2014

Once again, go is providing insights into US/China diplomacy. In the recent US policy of “rebalancing toward Asia,” Michael Spangler, writing 2014.11.02_war-college-quarterlyin the Summer 2014 issue of Parameters, the US Army War College quarterly, suggests that “Another way to look at this is to imagine a Chinese game of weiqi, the popular Asian game of black-and-white pieces in which two opposing players strive to surround the other. China’s July 2012 establishment of Sansha City on Paracel Island seized by force from Vietnam in 1974 was the precursor of its new weiqi games with the Philippines and Japan.” In “Rebalancing the Rebalance,” Spangler, a visiting fellow at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA, adds that “It is key that Manila’s talks not give Beijing any preponderant advantage by isolating or leveraging the Philippines against other disputants. In other words, this weiqi-like diplomatic negotiation can be completed as China’s future negotiation partners consult with each other.”
Thanks to Don Travis, a historian at the War College, and a new go player at the Carlisle Go Club.


China and Korea Even After Samsung Cup Quarter Finals

Wednesday October 22, 2014

The 2014 Samsung Cup semifinals took place in Daejeon, Korea on October 14. Because the “elite eight” consisted of four Chinese players and four Korean players, the sponsor arranged the draw so there would be four “China vs Korea” matches. Though Korea might have had the advantage with its top four players in the semifinals, the Chinese players had high rankings as well, with Shi Yue and Zhou Ruiyang as number one and number two.

The results: two Chinese players and two Korean players will proceed, with Park Junghwan 9p against defending champion Tang Weixing 9p and Shi Yue 9p facing Kim Jiseok 9p. Daejeon will host the semifinals from November 5 through November 7. For more information about the the quarter finals including game records, photos, and Shi Yue’s defeat of recent jabango champion Lee Sedol 9p, please visit Go Game Guru.
—Annalia Linnan, based on a longer article by Go Game Guru

2014 Samsung Cup Semifinalists: Tang Weixing, Park Junghwan, Shi Yue, Kim Jiseok

2014 Samsung Cup Semifinalists: Tang Weixing, Park Junghwan, Shi Yue, Kim Jiseok


The Power Report: Honinbo, Kisei Updates; Ryo Breaks Yuta’s Record; New Chinese Tourney

Monday May 20, 2013

by John Power,  Japan Correspondent for the American Go E-Journal

Iyama makes good start in Honinbo defense: The first game of the 68th Honinbo title match was played in Ota City in Shimane Prefecture on May 16 and 17. Taking white, Iyama  Honinbo defeated Takao Shinji 9P by 4.5 points. The game was closely fought, but Iyama drew ahead with a severe attack launched a little over 100 moves into the game. Winning with white is a good way to start off a best-of-seven. The second game will be played on May 28 and 29. Photo: Iyama Yuta, current Honinbo, courtesy Nihon Ki-in

38th Kisei Leagues: Two more games were played in the new Kisei leagues on May 16. In the second game in the A League, Cho U 9P (B) defeated Kiyonari Tetsuya 9P (Kansai Ki-in) by 15.5 points. In the first game in the B League, Murakawa Daisuke 7P (Kansai Ki-in) (W) beat Mizokami Tomochika 8P by resignation.

Youngest title-winner: Iyama Yuta’s record for youngest title-winner has been broken, though in an unofficial tournament. In the final of the 4th Okage Cup, held in Ise City on May 16, the fifteen-year old Ichiriki Ryo 3P defeated Anzai Nobuaki 6P, who had won the previous two cups.  Iyama Yuta won the Agon Kiriyama Cup at the age of 16, so Ichiriki has lowered his record by a year, though Iyama retains the record for an official title.  The tournament is sponsored by a manufacturer of traditional sweets, and is open to members of the Nihon Ki-in aged 30 and under. The format is NHK-style (30 seconds per move plus ten minutes of thinking time taken in one-minute units). The best 16 competed in a final knockout tournament, held on May 15 and 16. Born in Miyagi Prefecture on June 10, 1997, Ichiriki is a disciple of So Kofuku 9P. He became a professional in 2011. He is also enrolled in first year of high school. It will be interesting to see if he can follow further in the footsteps of Iyama. Photo: Ichiriki Ryo, courtesy Nihon Ki-in

New Chinese international tournament: Launching international tournaments seems to be the latest fashion in China, reflecting both the increasing prosperity of Chinese corporations and the high status of go as an intellectual sport. The increasing success of Chinese players in the international arena is undoubtedly another factor. The latest new arrival is the Mlily Cup World Open Tournament, sponsored by Mlily Healthcare. It starts out with an international qualifying tournament being held from May 21 to 24 that will decide 50 out of the 64 places in the first round of the main tournament. Of the 50, four places are reserved for women players and four for amateurs. The disposition of the 14 seeded places is five to China, three each to Japan and Korea, one to Chinese Taipei, and two special seeds selected by the organizers. First prize is 1,800,000 yuan (about $285,000). The first two rounds will be played in July, and the next two in August. The dates of the final and semifinals have not yet been decided. China graphic from