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DC Fall Open commentaries posted

Saturday September 22, 2018

Michael Redmond 9Ps commentaries — with E-Journal Managing Editor Chris Garlock — on the recent DC Fall Open are 2018.09.22_Fall-Open-commentaries-2now posted on the AGA’s YouTube channel. Originally broadcast live on 2018.09.22_Fall-Open-commentaries-3Twitch on September 8 from the E-Journal’s new broadcast studio at the National Go Center, the commentaries cover all four Board 1 games, and there’s also an interview  with the tournament’s winner, Yuan Zhou.

The commentaries were produced by Nathan Epstein, with special thanks to Keith Arnold, Joel Cahalan, Nate Eagle, Jeff Fitzgerald, Stephen Hu, Gurujeet Khalsa and Gary Smith.

 

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The Power Report (1 of 2): Iyama makes best 16 in Samsung Cup; Iyama takes two-game lead in Meijin; Ichiriki to challenge for Oza title

Saturday September 22, 2018

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal2018.09.22_Samsung Iyama

Iyama makes best 16 in Samsung Cup:
The opening round in the 2018 Samsung Cup was held at the Samsung Insurance Campus in Korea on September 4 to 6. (It’s the 23rd cup, but apparently the sponsor is not numbering them that way any more; the full title of the tournament goes Samsung Fire & Marine Insurance World Masters 2018.09.22_Samsung left Shibano right ChenBaduk 2018.) The first round is like a tournament in its own right: the 32 players are split up into eight groups of four, who then play each other. Two wins take you to the next round (whether your score is 2-0 or 2-1) and two losses (0-2 or 1-2) eliminate you.
Japan was represented by Iyama Yuta 9P (right), Shibano Toramaru 7P (left), and Ryu Shikun 9P (right, below). The first two were Japan’s seeded players; Ryu won a seat in the Seniors division of the international qualifying tournament and was playing in the main tournament for the first time since 2001.2018.09.22_Samsung  Ryu right
In the first game (September 4), Shibano was the only one to pick up a win. He defeated Chen Yaoye 9P of China, who eliminated him from the Bailing Cup (see my previous report). Shibano had white and won by 4.5 points. Iyama Yuta (W) lost to Tang Weixing 9P (China) by resig. and Ryu (W) lost to Li Xiangu 5P (China) by 1.5 points. In the 2018.09.22_Samsung Yun Iyamasecond game, played the next day, Iyama (W) beat Yun Seongshik (left, below), an amateur player from Korea, by resig.; Ryu (B) beat Wu Guangya 6P (China) by resig.; Park Junghwan 9P (Korea) (B) beat Shibano by resig. In the third game (the 6th), Iyama (B) beat Tan Shui 9P (China) by resig.; Gu Zihao 9P (China) (W) beat Shibano by resig.; Li Xiangu (B) beat Ryu by 1.5 points.
Iyama was the only one to make it to the second round, but Shibano and Ryu were by no means disgraced, as scoring even one win at this level is impressive. Actually, Shibano was in what was dubbed the “group of death,” as the other three players (Park, Gu, and Chen) are all past or present world titleholders. Ryu, who at the “advanced” age of 46 qualifies as a senior, was ahead in his third game, but slipped up in the endgame. He was chagrinned to lose twice to the same opponent by the same small margin.
The second round will be played on October 1.2018.09.22_43meijin2_Iyama

Iyama takes two-game lead in Meijin: The second game of the 43rd Meijin title match was held at the Kakujoro a traditional inn, in Tahara City, Aichi Prefecture, on September 12 and 13. Cho U, the challenger, is know for his skill at fighting kos and he seemed to take the initiative when he connected a ko in the first fight on move 55. However, there was a lot of action still to come: the game extended to 336 moves, making it the second-longest game in a Meijin title match. Both sides made mistakes or errors in judgment, so the lead shifted back and forth. The game was decided when Cho suffered a hallucination on move 253. This was decisive. Iyama (right) won the game by 2.5 points. Iyama: “The result of the ko fight at the beginning was not favorable for me. I thought it would be a drawn-out game, but I was not confident. I didn’t have a clue about some of the things going on and thought I had messed up the game, but I took profit with border moves in the middle game.” Cho: “There were many positions in which I thought the game was easier for me. I got my last chance in the endgame, but I hallucinated and lost about three points. The content was not bad for me, so I will make a fresh start and do my best.” The third game will be played on September 25 and 26.

Ichiriki to challenge for Oza title: The play-off to decide the challenger for the 66thOza title was held at the Nihon Ki-in in Tokyo on September 13. It was fought between two players younger than the title-holder Iyama Yuta: Ichiriki Ryo 7P (aged 20) and Motoki Katsuya 8P (aged 23). Taking black, Ichiriki won by resignation after 239 moves. He will make his second successive challenge for this title and his fifth challenge overall to Iyama. The first game will be played on October 26.

Tomorrow: Kisei Leagues; Tournament to decide the Kisei challenger; 74th Honinbo League seats; Yamashita-Iyama pairing in Tengen sets new record

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Your Move/Readers Write: The Eistellung Effect

Saturday September 22, 2018

“In response to Bill Cobb’s message of the importance to play moves out of our comfort zone (The Empty Board: Philosophical Reflections on Go #10 9/19 EJ),” writes Eric Osman, “I offer the following: A 7d player on kgs alerted me to the concept of Eistellung, which is the propensity we have for solving a problem in life (or on the go board) by using the methods we have learned, even though for this particular problem there’s a better way!”

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Jasiek releases new book on endgame

Friday September 21, 2018

Robert Jasiek’s new book “Endgame 2 – Values” is now available. The result of two years of work and research, Jasiek says 2018.09.16_Endgame_2_Coverthe book “teaches every relevant, basic aspect of endgame evaluation systematically, clearly and in detail.” It explains modern and traditional endgame theories, the microendgame, and the impact of scoring. “We evaluate positions, follow-up positions and moves so that all their values are consistent and related,” says Jasiek. “The theory is well applicable to every endgame position and move, approximates absolute truth and is supported by many examples.” The 260-page book is available in both  printed (EUR 26.50) and PDF (EUR 13.25) formats. Click here for a sample and here to purchase.

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Capture go app for iPhone

Thursday September 20, 2018

Image-1There is a new capture go app for Apple devices, designed for the very young.  “I created this app for my six-year-old grandson who was showing interest in my go playing, but was not yet mature enough to understand ko fights, trade-offs, and sacrifice,” says developer Tim Hoel.  The app walks users through rules and basic concepts, all with spoken narration.  Beginners can see examples of how situations play out, and then find solutions themselves. Simple lessons build from there, of which there are several, and then you can play against the computer.  It has three difficulty levels, so players can move up against the machine.  At level three, it is smart enough to occasionally catch even an experienced player.  Level one stays easy enough to keep young kids from getting frustrated.  Lessons can be reviewed at any point, and the rules are printed out in a separate tab as well. As this is capture go, and not regular go, one has to keep playing until one or more stones  are captured.  Passing is not an option, which means you will need to fill in your own eye if there are no other moves. Young players likely won’t make it to this point anytime soon, but when they do, it is arguable they are ready for full go. “Capture Go is a great way to get started because the rules are a little simpler and the goal is easy to understand, but it still teaches a lot about recognizing liberties, contact fights, forcing sequences, and planning ahead,” adds Hoel.  iPhone and iPad users can find the free app in the App Store, there is no Android version. -Paul Barchilon, EJ Youth Editor

 

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Problem of the Week

Simpler Win

Black to play